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jdturner11

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  1.  Oh this isn't for a game I planned, just theoretical stuff.  What's the reason for online play being better?
  2. This is a common thought of mine.    I play a game every so often called Mount&Blade:Warband. There is a mod called "Persistent World" in which you are thrown into an MMO sandbox-type world and you're essentially left with the standard fare choices to make. You can collect, craft, be a doctor, knight, whatever. Upon death you lose everything (though you do respawn) and are asked to roleplay being a new character. While I am not a fan of roleplaying, I agree to keep up the atmosphere.    The mod is fun, you have bandits, ransoms, duels, wars - it's all very "Persistent". But it had me thinking. This game would be reasonably more fun with absolutely no latency and a more surefire way to ensure that all players keep to some basic rules. At this point I was back to thinking about AI again, if it could match what an online player contributes and still has the same unpredictability.      What games have excellent AI? Do you think singleplayer can give the same multiplayer experience? If anyone plays the popular competitive multiplayer games (TF2, Halo, etc..) I'd love to hear your thoughts also.
  3. Do you feel like skills and abilities could be handled in a much more immersible way than spreadsheets/menus during creation? Guild Wars 2 had something interesting in terms of determining personal story by clicking on different key points in the char's history. While this isn't new by any stretch, I could see a similar method being used to determine one's class and abilities.
  4.  I really dislike being pigeonholed into playing a predetermined list of characters. I think it's lame and a step back in gaming. It's simply personal preference, I know a lot of people like linear stories and all of that, I don't. The first time I started feeling satisfied with character creation was SWG. Before then, I hadn't seen anything like it; the sliders, the deformation of characters, such a range of possibility! Really cool, really fun. However, this stopped being rare and I started disliking how "meta" it felt. Sculpting your character is cool, certainly, though I think it can be improved. This is, of course, meaning improvements with adhering to immersion.  With that said, let's speculate on how the formula can be improved. Do YOU feel like it could be better? What would you want in your game? Does immersion start when gameplay begins or when you advance from the start menu?  
  5. You could kill the character after ten seconds of disconnect, I find that in those type of games, 10 seconds is the most fair for both sides. Enough time to finish the other's action ON the disconnector and then enough for the disconnector to have SOME consequence without it being too harsh.
  6. Because of poor mechanics and lazy modeling... I'm sorry to say it so bluntly, but it's true and it's nothing you can't change.  The flying, enlargement after eating, minecraft blocks, assault weapon... They are so tacked on. The flight makes it REALLY easy to escape, also, it just looks like someone is in dev mode when they fly. Where are the effects?   It's boring because nobody wants to shoot primitives(cubes, spheres, cylinders) with a pasted on texture using cheap effects....    This would just be me bashing you if I didn't put in advice and I DO want you to improve your design.   Put more effort into the visuals. This is YOUR work, YOUR creative output into the world, are you really proud of how it looks?   This world is foreign with odd monsters and odd rules. Throw out the modern weaponry, maybe give them a neat alien blaster, a primitive sling shot, something that goes with YOUR vision. Flying is fun! But not in this game, you are not soaring, you are oddly moving along axis like you're in spectator mode within CS:Source. Have different speeds, gliding, make it more involved. This is flight we're talking about, if you ask someone their chosen superpower it probably would be flight!  Tie in being airborne with something else. Maybe you fly to high peaks as those are the only habitable places (ground being inhabited by the monsters). You need to fly down to get food, eating TOO MUCH food makes you slow down and if you CARRY too much you won't be able to fly.  Maybe you carve INTO those high peaks, using the dynamic terrain, to make a cave as your home.  Just some ideas man, I wish the best, please keep us updated.  I'm serious. I'll find you.
  7.  I think you're finding cheap ways to restrict this class, OP.  You have an idea you think is fun and want to throw it into the game, restricted. Why punish players for wanting to do something they like? Instead of preventing overpopulation how about actually creating gameplay specific consequences in the game?  I get kind of ill when I see premium classes and cash shops already being made in games that are literally just ideas. That's so cheap man, you can do better than that, it's just bad design. There are a number of things you can do, none of which I expect you to choose but at least lead you on a more developer-y path: 1. Add a special feature that retains the same entertainment value of stealing for each class. Mages that can research, knights that can duel, rangers that can hunt. 2. Scrap classes altogether. Give everyone the ability to steal and a chance success rate, but being caught is an arrest (winning the success roll would give them the object they're after). Give them the opportunity to arrest, too! Sandbox type classes have a huge demographic.   3. Make classes feed off each other, thieves that need merchants, police that need thieves, merchants that need police. You see what I mean? Synergy. It's a powerful thing.     No offense, I just think you can succeed and hate to see you cut corners!
  8.  You're thinking too much. Just do it.  That's all, just do it - do it so you can do it better next time, do it so you can learn, do it for YOURSELF and so you don't become another "would be" game developer.
  9. I think this is a lesson in never using youtube as a source of reliable information.
  10. Hey man, this game reference I'm going to list isn't TD, but it should give you some inspiration for possible ragdoll/limb destroying features! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6NGBGwtwpk
  11. Go on GOG.com, purchase Master of Magic, Alpha Centaurai, Master of Orion 1 + 2 - play the heck out of them. They're on sale right now, so buy them, get inspiration and see how great a 2D game can be!
  12. I think immortality can be a great game mechanic. It would encourage you to be creative on other conditions aside from death, depending on the reason for immortality. All you need is a strong gameplay focus that attaches to it. Whether it be exploration, rescue, creation; if it's fun enough, immortality will be an excellent compliment.
  13. You were right that graphics do NOT make a game, I don't think the issue is with it being text based, OP - I think the issue is with your gameplay. The problem with being linear in a text based game is the fact that it goes against the genre. People need descriptive environments, lots of choices, building relationships,crafting,deviation from the storyline, and more. Give it another run through and ask yourself if the path you chose in development is really the best one.
  14. [quote name='ShiftyCake' timestamp='1355834661' post='5012019'] Your asking us details on a concept so generalized, its impossible to do so. Sandbox is literally "free roam". A concept that the player is given a world, and the choice of what to do with said world. Therefore the only way to make your game successful is by creating "prolonged gameplay + replayability". This means that the gameplay must be enjoyable over a long period of time, and not lose its fun factor after one playthrough. This is the basis of Sandbox creations, and its the [u]only[/u] way to make them successful. If you wish for a good reference on these sort of games to start you off, either visit Don't Starve or Minecraft. Both are true sandbox games, and will give you an idea of what you can accomplish with them. And yes, Sandbox games can have an ending to them. But they always give it as a choice, otherwise it would just be a story game. Minecraft does this, with The End, but allows you to play after. If you want to see more of a strategy-based Sandbox game then a survival-based one, look up Triple Town. It's a simple game, yet elegent, and its concept is as original as it gets. Another one is Age Of Empires. Yes, it is a sandbox game. [/quote] He did specify MMO, however, so that changes things up a bit. A recent one coming out is Darkfall, but that is developed by a lackluster group of individuals. I don't consider it as a serious entry into the market. The last sandbox MMO I played.. was Eve, I enjoyed it, but it didn't captivate me very long. I think sandbox MMOs can be great, but honestly OP, I don't see the point in gauging markability/player enjoyment from a section that averages maybe 10 posts per thread. Feedback is FOR the concept, not a precursor TO the concept. Approach this more statistically - look up games that are sandbox MMOs, look at their forums, look at other MMO forums, maybe create a poll on each one? If that's what you want to make, then make it. Unfortunately, the chance of more than a few people ever playing your game is slim so it gives you a great excuse to ditch popularity and pursue YOUR game. I call it "positive negatives" - be realistic, but still keep things optimistic.
  15. [quote name='RedBaron5' timestamp='1355758956' post='5011746'] [quote name='dakota.potts' timestamp='1355724557' post='5011556'] However, these were both fighting games. [/quote] I'm actually trying to incorporate fighting game concepts into an RPG. The game is based on sword-fighting and encounters are set up as duels (you only ever fight one person at a time.) [quote name='jdturner11' timestamp='1355498067' post='5010630'] Do you have any screenshots of your game? I'm really interested in seeing what you made! [/quote] I don't have any screenshots yet. Haven't spend too much time on appearances yet, mostly just coding. Once I have something to show, I'll definitely start a thread with screenshots and some gameplay. [/quote] Encounters like Soul Calibur dungeon mode/Pokemon/FF where you're goin' along and then the screen transitions to a traditional 1v1 fighting screen or like a 3rd person open world with only duels as combat?