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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Jirachex

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  1. You are probably better off getting to know indie developers. I doubt that a company like that would take a player's opinion with the same weight an indie team would. That does bring up the question, where are all the open source games?   - Jirachex
  2. The game looks really good but I would never write a 21 page story... Usually to come up with games I make a simple prototype that is fun and playable. Have you started doing anything else except the story? You seem to have went into a lot of detail for a game that doesn't exist yet.   - Jirachex
  3. I tried both engines out and personally I prefer Unity 3D.   The lack of rendering to texture and dynamic shadows in Unity Indie are not that limiting. You could still make a game that looks great, or try to develop an art-style that doesn't require dynamic shadows to look good. As for Unity vs. UDK, UDK seems to be more geared to develop shooters with high quality graphics and Unity is more of a blank slate that lets you do anything. Sure you can get the same results with UDK but unless you are trying to make an FPS, allot of code will have to be rewritten. I also heard that the built in networking in UDK only scales up to 64 players where as the built in networking in Unity is not limited by a number of players.   Overall, Unity is much more user friendly and it's cross platform support makes it very easy to run your game anywhere. UDK is more of a professional level tool with fancy graphics rendering and an FPS code base right out-of-the-box.   - Jirachex
  4.   That's exactly what I'm going for. Thanks for all the replies, it's certainly some useful input.   - Jirachex
  5. @sunandshadow I like the idea of mini-games and I'm currently thinking of a way to introduce a system like that where many mini-games can be played together in an open world. Since the goal is social interaction, it makes sense to blend them all seamlessly so that even if I like one mini-game and someone else likes another we still play together while still doing the things we love and even encouraging each other to try something new.     Thanks for the advice, that's exactly what I'm trying to ask here. I didn't explain my concept to limit other people's creativity, I did to help give a general feel for how the game looks currently. I posted here cause that is what I want to find out, what new things could I add to this genre, maybe even invent a whole new genre. Aside from simplistic combat found in every WoW clone, what ideas would people like to see realized in a game like this? Anything combat related or not is welcome, it just has to be fun.   - Jirachex
  6. Depends on the variety you have in each level. If they're all the same with different patterns then 30 - 40 levels should be fine. After that it would start to get repetitive. If you plan on introducing new game mechanics every few levels that would help in making the game feel less repetitive. It really depends on your game but I hope that helps.   - Jirachex
  7. Every time I read about some newbie trying to complete their first game that happens to be a WoW killer I get discouraged since their is so much hate directed towards anyone attempting to make a game like that. Everyone would say it's impossible alone or it takes millions of dollars to complete. I'm working on my own multiplayer RPG game in Unity 3D. It's not my first time programming and i'm not trying to make something with the same quality or amount of content as a triple A title. I understand that something like that simply isn't reasonable and is way out of scope. Instead I'm trying to make something simpler, that focuses on socializing and adventure rather the grinding in a massive world with thousands of people like traditional MMO's. It's pretty much a multiplayer RPG. Not very massive. I've been working on it for a while now and I have a functional prototype. In the current game, the player can walk/jump around in a full 3D colorful world and chat with other players. I was wondering what would be features or gameplay mechanics that would go well with this type of game.   The game is made to be simple, with casual gameplay and a focus on the multiplayer aspect. Interaction with other people is a goal and I'm trying to find other ways to do this other then just combat. The graphics are cel-shaded boxes, sort of like a Minecraft world with solid colors instead of textures and much more varied block shapes. The control scheme is similar to a Third-Person Shooter where you use WASD to walk and the mouse looks around with the camera positioned over the shoulder. Nothing too complex but there is no real game play yet. For the technical and networking side, I wrote a functional persistent server capable of handling 100 players at a time and a client with client-sided prediction. The server is fully authoritative and I have a simple anti-cheat that is mostly accurate. Right now the only information that gets stored on the server is the player's position.   How can I turn this into an actual game? What gameplay elements could I implement to make it fun? Would it be possible to actually finish a kind of project like this, turning into a fully playable game? I'm very determined to it and I'm not asking anyone to write it for me and I don't have the money to higher people to help me out since I'm still in high school. I know I have the skills to fix any technical issues that may arise. I just need some sort of advice on making the actual game part, and maybe ideas on how to make a world like this more interesting, without resorting to ripping off other games.   Thanks for reading, and sorry if this is in the wrong section. I'm new here.   - Jirachex