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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Darkwind

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  1. Thanks for that Dreamer. Legacy and Microsoft are two things I have learnt to deem hand in hand. Having clients at work with office 2003, and IE 7 I have to cater for them too. With regards to Mono just did a little bit of light reading and that looks like an excellent choice going forward. As cross platform isn't something ive really looked at with getting my foot in the door, my plan so far is as follows. 1. Finishing getting XNA4 installed correctly. Should have guessed it wouldn't run properly in VS2012, just finished the re build of my laptop to Win7 Ent with VS2010 Ult. 2. Follow a tutorial on the basics of 2D game development in XNA using "XNA 4.0 Game Development by Example: Beginner's Guide" which I picked up yesterday. 3. Generate a few clones of some simple games using XNA 4. Get Mono installed. 5. Generate a few clones using Mono. 6. Move onto bigger more technical projects (such as pathfinding). 7. Putting all the pieces of my technical projects together to create a basic RPG type game. 8. Do some polishing. Thats my 8 "Major" goals for this year, if it only takes 6 months to get to 7 ill be happy. As ive never really looked at this before I dont know if thats a realistic time scale, and no doubt real life will get in the way somewhere. Anyone with any comments on those points? That seems realistic to me, am I missing something blatantly obvious? Also all of this will be in 2D, Not planning on 3D until I have the resources to actually draw in 3D, my blendering skills are less than desired at the moment. Ben
  2. I'm just going to say thanks for the article, it really did get my foot moving towards the gaming door, and slightly through it. I've written a lot of Javascript in the last year as I work mainly on web apps. And I agree with you there are a lot of WTF moments, especially with DOMs load order in IE compared to well everything else. JQuery document.ready was my friend in a lot of cases... I can't say I have any incentive to go for HTML5 yet, as there doesn't seem to be a standard, and headaches between browsers is something for now id rather avoid. I hadn't even looked at LUA, but with that recommendation I may just go do so, isn't it more of a "Scripting" language? At the moment I think I am going to stick with XNA and see where that takes me, next step would probably be Java with again your recommendation of Jmonkey Ben
  3.   Ive looked at Unity in the past, and I think it is a bit above what I am aiming for at the moment, 3D is something I haven't really looked into. SharpDX looks interesting though,    Thanks for those, I had taken a look at the list of engines, I didn't realise there were so many to choose from, do you have any recommendations, personal preferences?       You are welcome and welcome to game dev   I had briefly touched on looking at Java, as someone I know recommended JMonkeyEngine.   Thank you for the warm welcome, its good to be here :)     Thanks for the book suggestion, there seems to be a lot of them from a quick browse on the web. Ill probably end up picking up a copy of this along with some general C++ books for some "light reading".   Ben
  4. Hello Everyone,    I'm going to start this with a bit about me. I am a relatively new programmer, and have been in the working world for the past 2 years now. My main programming language is C#. I have also dabbled in VB6 in the office, to support some of our legacy applications.   For the past 3 years I have been "mentoring" a team of students at a sixth form college in robotics, which is primarily coded in C++, also with this I have taught myself some Java, as one of the students wanted to learn it and apply it to robotics.   My question is, like many before me have asked, where should I begin to look at game developing?   My first stop on the road was to look at http://www.gamefromscratch.com/post/2011/08/04/I-want-to-be-a-game-developer.aspx which is about a year out of date, which seems to be a long time in the development circles.   A brief on the article says to avoid C++, is this a wise choice for starting out?   From that article I also started to look at XNA, however from doing a quick google it appears that Microsoft are not supporting this for windows 8, not that this is a big factor in my choices. As a MSDN holder, I have access to the full MS Development tools anyway.   My next stop would have to be Java, now I don't know if this is a misconception but I believe that it follows the same syntax and structure as C#, and seems to be widely support on the GDK side of things. Correct?   I'm going to preemptively try and answer a question I think I am going to get asked, and that is "What type of game do you want to make?"   In the long run my aim is to put together a RPG type game, with a few possible starting "Classes", walk around some open spaces, go into some dungeons, kill some bosses, win some loot, save a princess. You know that sort of thing.   I am well aware, that this is a long time goal, and I guess my first attempt would be something along the lines of "snake" or a simple "old school" game.   Thanks for reading this and any help would be much appreciated.   Ben