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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Jesse Dager

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  1. When I was working on performance with alot of meshs, I found it very profitable to 'flag' which of my meshs was static, and then, on runtime, combine all static meshs into one large mesh object and then render that. It worked rather well because it was iterating through a small number of meshs (the vertex count was high for each mesh, however)
  2. I created a simple sprite editor for the TI-99/4a... I'm sure there was one available for devs at the time.
  3. So far, it looks pretty good. Again, I'd like to reiterate what ferrous said: avoid magic numbers! He says it's a minor nit, but as you develop software further, you will grow to regret using numbers like that.   Also, i suggest using the code tags when posting code. It just makes it easier to read. :D
  4. I would also suggest this, but later. For now, I suggest you focus on learning a little bit of everything. That way, you have a wide scope of things to choose from when you decide to focus on one field.
  5. Welcome to GDNet, the place where programmers, artists, and musicians all get along to create sweet sweet magic. :D   But seriously, this is THE place to go for programming info. 
  6. First off, welcome to the forums! Secondly, if you're looking for experienced developers, here's the place. Most if not everyone here is here to share knowledge and build a solid knowledge base for all programmers to use.  One of the best things you can do is start reading and posting. Get yourself out there, and talk to a few experienced devs even on this site! That's where I started several years ago. Now I'm developing my own game engine based on the knowledge I've learned here.   Good luck in your endeavors!
  7. I personally prefer to dev on a Windows 7 machine. Most programs these days are dev'd to be cross platform, however, so if you plan on going that route, the OS is up to what you're comfortable with.   In terms of brands, I generally stick to HP. I've had AlienWare and it was the most unreliable piece I've owned (my own experience). As a starting dev, I wouldn't worry about graphics hardware too much (unless you plan on PLAYING alot of games on the machine). Development generally doesn't take crazy amounts of computer power until you get into some crazy shaders and things.   As for the engine, that's your own personal preference and what you like. Unity is cross platform and simple to use. UDK has an amazing graphics engine, CryEngine... well, I'd stay away... it's very cookie-cutter and not particularly user friendly.   I personally didn't start with an engine. I began with programming, but that's just because that's how I do best. I think in a more technically logical way, so coding was best for me. If you are more visual, using an engine like Unity may be more your speed. It all depends on how you want to get into it.
  8. Are you talking 3d or 2d? If 3d, i have some algorithms I used way back in my AVR days...
  9. From the album Project Foxclaw

    An experiment with terrain generation. Texturing is bugged, but the generation is pretty solid.
  10. From the album Project Foxclaw

    A cockpit from Alien Savior 3 in Project Foxclaw
  11. From the album Project Foxclaw

    Just a screenshot from Alien Savior 3's main menu in Project Foxclaw
  12. From the album Project Foxclaw

    So I loaded Peach's castle in Project Foxclaw... Works like a charm!
  13. From the album Project Foxclaw

    Just showing off the physics debug of Project Foxclaw
  14. From the album Project Foxclaw

    My first waltz with blender loaded in Project Foxclaw
  15. From the album Project Foxclaw

    The exterior of a public-domain, high poly model loaded and physics mapped in Project Foxclaw