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AspireAN

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  1. Cyber, that it is a really good idea. I will have to consider that!
  2. Great points, HappyCoder! I definitely appreciate you taking the time to comment here.    I was hoping for density to be part of the strategy aspect, but you make good points about it. I am leaning towards it being something that requires the user to find "gravity wells", which up entering increases the density a certain amount. Meanwhile, at all times, density is slowly decreasing towards 0%, so it then becomes something not particularly under the player's control.   However, I will definitely consider removing it to because you make good points about it. Thanks!
  3. Hi, Just a very quick summary of who I am: I started out as a tester for an outsource company, and then moved on to Bethesda Softworks. I got a job as a tester at an education company where they’ve allowed me to pro-actively build up my experience in programming. Now, I am essentially a programmer there. I’ve always wanted to create video games, but I found most of my ideas aimed unrealistically high for what I am capable of. I’ve finally settled on my first project; Furion: Critical Mass. This game is a 3D, top-down view, arcade-style romp with hopefully a few twists on the old formulas. Here’s a summary of the premise: The player is a sentient being of pure energy called a Furion. The game takes place after the culmination of a great war between the Furion and their enemy, the Accretions. Two great armadas are left in ruin. The Accretions were able to protect a Riftwalker Warship which has a weapon capable of destroying the vulnerable Furion world. Your species has rallied to imbue you with all the power they have to scramble one last attack before the enemy can annihilate you. Here’s a summary of the design/gameplay: The player is a ball of energy with two metrics to indicate its state; mass indicates how much energy the user has. This goes from 0% to 100%. This is essentially the player’s hitpoints, but with a little twist. It is game over if you reach 0% or if you reach 100%. Your character increases in diameter as you increase in mass, making it harder to avoid obstacles and enemies. To counter this, your character can manipulate a density attribute from 0-100%. This dictates your diameter, so one can use this to shrink in size despite being at a higher mass. Every time the player uses their attack, the player loses a small amount of mass. Inversely, a lot of items/obstacles/enemy fire can either drain mass or increase it. It will be important to learn these dynamics as a player progresses, but the game will assist the player (without holding their hand). The player will need to fight enemies, destroy various objects, and solve moving puzzles to survive and progress through levels. All the while, one will need to be cognizant of their mass. The player will have various unlockable and upgradable attacks at their disposal to accomplish these things. Some example attacks are: Pulse: Basic energy shot Twilight Incinerata: Constant beam of energy. Cannot move or re-aim while firing. Ion Storm: Unleashes a furious storm of energy blasts at the closest enemy, no matter their position. Target must cannot be chose, and must be within maximum range. Pulsar: Upgraded pulse attack option that fires pulse shots in all directions along a 180 degree plain given the position one is firing at. Some special abilities include: Bend Time: Upgradable power that slows, and at higher levels, stops time for a short duration. Shockwave: Power that sends a wave of energy in all directions, damaging or destroying enemies and destructible objects. EMP: Wave of energy that shuts down electronic-type enemies and overloads energy-type obstacles or enemies. Black Hole: Travels slowly in direction of attack dealing high damage to everything it touches, including the player. Magnetar Mode: (Must have 90%+ mass to activate) This causes density to increase from 0% to 100% [E a gravity metric that I am considering for the game, which would impact nearby objects and enemies]. During this time, the character cannot use normal attacks. When gravity reaches 100%, the power known as Super Nova will be ready for use. Super Nova: When gravity is at 100%, the attack will be charged and ready for use. Launches a ball of energy that collapses and then explodes in a massive fashion, destroying all enemies and objects on the screen, leaving the player with a mass just above 0%. ----- I hope you like the idea. Please give me any sort of constructive feedback. I am actually a published semi-pro scifi author, so I have pretty thick skin. So far, I have the system for mass and density implemented and working pretty well. I am knee-deep in working on the AI and the level design and will be posting updates whenever it seems like a good idea. Thanks for reading, commenting, and giving any feedback on the idea!
  4. shadowisadog, I really appreciate that advice. I will check out those engines.    Thank you for the reminder to play a bunch of games in this genre. I had done that in the not-to-distant past, but I need to continue that as I finish my game design document. I do actually have a game design document for this, but it is only approximately 50% fully-fleshed out. That being said, I'm sure it doesn't follow standards for such a document. It is written much like a play, with scenes being set up, characters and special items described, and then dialogue and events scripted out in the scenes and acts. Do you have any recommended standards for the format? That is something I've googled the heck out of. I'd say google was about 50% of the resources I used to teach myself programming, but despite my familiarity with it, I never found any standard for game design documents.   Thanks again for the great info. I appreciate all the time you put into your reply
  5. Hi There, Years ago I was very interested in turning one of my sci-fi stories into a game. At the time, I didn't have the necessary skills to translate my story into a game; not without having to heavily rely on others.   At that time, I had a degree in Organismal Biology with a minor in English Literature. I decided that I wanted to one day be a video game designer. I started as a tester in the industry, even working with Bethesda Softworks. Since then, I've taught myself how to program and now I am essentially a programmer for my current company. I am going back to school, slowly, to get a bachelors in computer programming. In that time, I made one attempt to get one of my sci-fi short stories published, and actually succeeded (semi-pro).   Now, I am able to provide a large portion of the effort towards my game idea. It would not have been fair to write the story, the game design, and then rely on a programmer to make it all happen. Now I can do this myself, or contribute to that effort equally, which makes me again ready to take a stab at making Wake: Evolution Through Extinction. The link on the game's name takes you to textadventures.co.uk where I began developing a text adventure version of this game idea 2 years ago.    I would like to begin developing this into a graphical Point-and-Click adventure. It will be a heavily story/dialogue/plot-driven adventure with puzzles and hidden object design principles.    I am looking for advice on approaching such a huge undertaking. What engine is best for this type of game (I am fluent in C#)? How might I best approach stirring up the support of the community, possibly building a team to develop this? I am happy for any advice!
  6. Hah, that's an awesome resource. Thanks for that, Ashaman!
  7. With the very limited information given, I can come up with a few names. Although, it does not sound like the game is incredibly deep in terms of story (Although I can't really know for sure). But if that is the case, I would try to keep the name simpler than something like "Genesis: Rise of Man"   You could just go with "Genesis" Also: "Shock Point" "Rift Runners" etc.   They are all very generic names, but without any pitch for the story, we can't really come up with any custom names.
  8. There are some grammar/spelling/missing info issues (I think) that are making it difficult for me to understand the story. I will post what you wrote in a quote below, and post comments etc. in red within it.     I mean this in the best way possible - as constructive criticism rather than an insult of any kind.   You have a serious number of spelling and grammar errors in just this synopsis. What this says to me is that you can't be bothered to use a spell-check (I don't know if it is because I am using google chrome or not, but my words are spell-checked as I type them into this message box.   What this tells me is that "I shouldn't be bothered to read it". I read it anyway because I wanted to help. I'm sure you are well-aware that throwing your work out there for the sharks to criticize requires thick skin. But I apologize if this is harsh; it's just my first reaction. That's not to say that we don't all make grammar errors or spelling errors, even with all the tools available to us to prevent them. I certainly have my fair share. But there is a fine line between mistakes and sloppiness.   There are a few plot points missing that would make the idea cohesive, such as motives for declaring war on the Spiranmut during the outbreak. Also, "a group of mad scientists" is an incredibly flimsy plot device (at least in my opinion). Did they meet at a crazy scientist convention? If you have to answer this question... "What was their motive" with the answer, "Because they are crazy", then you have a pretty weak section of the story-line there.   Also, you called this steampunk, but nothing you mentioned in this description would make it a steampunk story-line.   All that being said, the overarching idea isn't bad, but you have some work to do to make the idea cohesive, easier to read and critique, and stronger.   Good luck!
  9. Ok, I've edited the original post so that, after the synopsis, a detailed representation of all the scenes in the demo is displayed. I hope you guys like it. All advice or interest is very welcome. Thanks!
  10.   There's a problem with how you discuss player actions. You describe them as scripted, not interactive.  You cannot dictate the player's actions and emotional states.   Player's possible actions: examine newspaper, open drawer, open door, open blinds, pick up blaster.  Opening door takes player to the street. Goal for this scene: find answers. In the street the player can explore the following: dumpster, wrecked house, parking garage, parked aircar, intact house, restaurant with smashed front window.  Exploring aircar permits player to take off and fly.   See, a game is not like a movie.  It's interactive. You have to describe it that way. Awesome advice! Thanks for stating that so clearly. I will edit the scenes with that in mind so that I am not describing it as if it was a fully-scripted event.      Here is the new format I will try using. Let me know if this makes more sense and is more professional and explanatory. I will edit the original post when I've got the new scene format finished.     Scene "#" (NAME) Characters: Items of Interest (IOI): Journal Puzzles: None Hidden Object Games: None Goal: Possible actions:   Notes:
  11. I think I am misrepresenting something. There will be hidden objects in most frames, hopefully. And puzzles in virtually every other frame. It wouldn't simply be a series of pictures. But I understand your concern, and appreciate the heads up. I will just focus that much more on making sure a puzzle and hidden object feature is in essentially ever frame, to some capacity.   Actually, I think that is an outdated flowchart of the demo. Actually, it definitely is. I need to find what happened to the newer one. That added a lot of details to the initital frames.
  12. Thanks, Mayple. Here is a short depiction of the demo and how it is structured. Being a hidden object and puzzle, point and click adventure, the game is a static 2D or isometric 2D, based on various scenes.     Demo build; flow chart concept: Scene 1: (Inside stasis chamber room)  Player wakes up inside hyper-stasis room and meets alien expedition team. Scene 2: (View of door peeled back by expedition team, sees light shining into the stasis room) Player requests to see the outside world and find answers to why the world as we knew it had ended. Scene 3: (View outside of the rubble, overlooking an ancient city) Players sees world as it is and his resolve is strengthened – to find answers. Scene 4: (The player sees several options for exploration into the city, including what appears to be a school, an old street, or a sinkhole that leads into the ancient sewers, which may be easier to traverse than the others. For the sake of the demo, only one route is available, the streets.) Scene 5: (The player proceeds down the street) The buildings have buckled and listed. Husks of cars line the streets. A great age ended long ago. Scene 6: (Player encounters first puzzle at blocked section of streets.) The street is blocked and a rusted old door needs to be opened in a nearby building to continue. A tin roof covers some old solar panels and a generator. The user, first, must clean off the debris covering the solar panels. Then, they must find a way to get sunlight through the roof panels. Since the solar panels are bolted to the ground, and the roofing is thin, but sturdy, the player must devise a way to puncture small holes into the roof, using a device that the aliens are carrying with them. This device fires small transmitters that help to map locations in three dimensions. They are fired at a high enough velocity to reach high points, or puncture through a nearby tin roof. With light shining through to the solar panels, the generator begins to power up, allowing the player to proceed once the door opens. **This is the end of the first part of the demo. A second, demonstrating the hidden object aspects will follow**
  13.   Aspire, Recruiting is not permitted in our discussion forums.  That's what the Classifieds are for. I'm not locking this thread at this time, but you came perilously close to crossing the line here.    Edit: I edited the title of this thread so as to step it farther back from the line. My apologies, Tom. Wont happen again. I had some earlier confusion with the classifieds and made a post about it. I think I see where I was confused though. Would it be ok if I can delete this, and post it later there in the classifieds?
  14. Hi there, everyone!   I wanted to gauge any interest, design ideas, compliments or criticism, that people might have about this story and design for WAKE.   I have delete the story in this post to make this post shorter and easier to read. To read the story about WAKE, please visit this link: WAKE Storyline   If I were to describe WAKE in one sentence of descriptors, it would be: Mass Effect meets I Am Legend meets Singularity (Video Game) meets Life After People (History Channel Show).   Here is a the demo's play-out. I hope this gives a good idea of how the game progresses, and the story too.          WAKE: Evolution through Extinction       Scene 1 (INTRO) Characters: Assumed to be “ThePlayer", Duffy, and Ziggy in every scene, until otherwise noted. Items of Interest (IOI): Journal Puzzles: None Hidden Object Games (HOG):None   Goal: -The player meets Ziggy and Duffy after waking from hyper-sleep. Possible actions: -Player can collect IOI journal -Player can continue onto the next section   Notes: -A journal can be collected next to a skeleton in a broken hyper-space pod. The journal reads:   “Something is trying to break in: I’ve got no clue what it is. The door seems sturdy enough, but there’s no food or water in here. I’m trapped, and the only way out seems to be to sleep through this nightmare. The sign on the wall says ‘stasis’, and there are a couple people in these pods. It all seems remarkably straightforward, but I still pray that I am calibrating my pod correctly. I don’t want to die.   Scene 2 (“Letting it all sink in”) Items of Interest (IOI): Yes– via HOG Puzzles: No Hidden Object Games (HOG): Yes Goal: -Leave the hyper-stasis room and see what the outside world has become. Possible actions: -HOG -Player can talk to Ziggy and Duffy to learn more about them and what   they have seen on Earth so far -Player can continue to the next section once specific items have been collected that will aid in exploration Notes: - HOG, where the player collects various objects from a scene that has alien tools and devices from the expedition team. The expedition team has collected some trinkets, odds, and ends, that they have stored here that adds to the scene Scene 3 (“Had to see it with my own two eyes”) Items of Interest (IOI): Time Capsule via HOG Puzzles: No Hidden Object Games (HOG):  Yes Goal: -Rummage through the debris and pick up the time capsule, before proceeding. Possible actions: -HOG -After time capsule is recovered during HOG, player can proceed to the next area Notes: -The HOG has several items that appear to have recently fallen out of a busted time capsule. The player must find a vial with a note, among other items (including a cell phone), before proceeding. The note reads;   “Hello from Westfall Elementary class of 2024. We are excited to leave for you a few original drawings and writings from our students, and a small stash of our time’s precious technology. It is our hope that the creativity of our class will inspire whoever should find this, and that the technology will leave you in awe of the progress of mankind. The world you see before you now is thanks, in no small part, to the students of 2024.” Duffy expresses interest in the phone, telling you to hold on to it. It will offer a vital interface with human technology that may be encountered. He uses his scanner to reprogram and configure the phone and hands it back to the player.     Scene 4 (“Put a fork in it”)   *Area splits into three paths; easy, medium, and hard. The Demo has a set path*     Items of Interest (IOI): No Puzzles: No Hidden Object Games (HOG):  No   Goal: -Choose a path; easy, medium, or hard. In the demo, the player will be taking the medium route (streets). Possible actions to achieve goal: -Player can proceed to the next area   Notes: -None Scene 5 (“Paleontology is not my strong suit”) *Area is a HUB for several side locations that are of importance in completing the puzzle in this scene*   Items of Interest (IOI): Yes Puzzles: Yes Hidden Object Games:  No Goal: -The incomplete skeleton of some massive creature lies in a bed of wires. Somehow, the wires are still electrified. That mystery is secondary to finding a way to cross. To complete the puzzle, the player must complete the skeleton to crawl over it and reach the other side of the electrified ground.   Possible actions to achieve goal: -Proceed to side-scenes where bones can be collected to complete the skeleton -Player can explore a derelict combat tank, and a makeshift shelter for refugees -Player can proceed to the next area when the skeleton is complete Notes: -The pieces of the skeleton must be found. Using a multi-purpose device of Duffy’s the player can attach magnets to these pieces and place them into the skeleton from a safe distance. With all of the pieces collected and attached, the player can cross the electrified bed and reach the other side. -The IOI’s in this scene are bones hidden within the landscape Scene4a (“Tanks for the memories”)   Items of Interest (IOI): Yes   Puzzles: No Hidden Object Games:  Yes   Goal: -The tank hatch is sealed, but unlocked. The player must open the top and look inside. The light shines in, revealing an array of items. The player must find the bones in this section, and return to Scene 4. Possible actions to achieve goal: -Player can examine the national emblem on the tank by clearing mold and dirt -Player can engage in HOG -Player can return to Scene 4   Notes: -One IOI is the emblem on the tank. When the player cleans it off, they discover that the tank has the flag of Britain on it. Yet, the marquee in Scene 4b states that this location is in America. -The other IOI’s in this scene are several bones hidden in the tank or the landscape outside of the tank. Scene 4b (“Help never came”) Items of Interest (IOI): Yes Puzzles: No Hidden Object Games:  Yes Goal: -Find bones in refugee structure via the HOG and landscape around it. Then return to Scene 4. Possible actions: -Player can interact with an IOI, which is a marquee that has fallen from a wall, and lies on the floor. -Player can interact with an IOI, which is a message scrawled on the wall of the shelter. -Player can search the scene for additional bones -Player can engage in HOG to discover more bones -Player can return to Scene 4   Notes: -One IOI is an old marquee lying on the ground. A message is faintly burned into the marquee from prolonged use. It reads, “Breaking News: Chaos as”. With the message cut off, Duffy tells the player that he can use the repurposed cell phone to wirelessly interface with the device. The phone can use this interface to translate the data stored into the text that once flashed on this marquee screen. It reads, “Breaking News: Chaos as the government of our United States has officially dissolves into a state of martial law. All remaining citizens are advised to flee high density population areas.” -Another IOI is a message scrawled on the wall; “Jen Barrister (Heart + “4ever”) Desmond. I have to get the children to safety. Find us. You know how to follow the bread crumbs. Remember, I love you! -The other IOI’s in this scene are several bones hidden the HOG and shop =========================================================== **With all pieces of the skeleton found, the player can arrange them to complete the skeleton and continue on** ============================================================   Scene 5 (“Let there be light”) Items of Interest (IOI): Yes Puzzles: Yes Hidden Object Games:  Yes Goal: -A large metal door is blocking your progress. The player must find a way around it to continue. Possible actions: -Player can interact with several solar panels -Player can interact with a tin roof that casts a shadow over the solar panels -Player can interact with an old, but seemingly functional generator near the large door -Player can proceed to a side-area (Scene 5a) -Player can formulate a solution to the puzzle, which would open the door and allow the player to continue on in their search for answers Notes: -The player can choose several interactions with each solar panel. Only one does anything that helps the player solve the puzzle, which is cleaning the solar panels off. -The player will only receive a message when interacting with the tin roof. “This roof looks thin, but too sturdy to pull down. It’s casting a shadow over these solar panels.” The player, remembering the all-purpose tool of Duffy’s, may note that the tool shot the magnets out at a reasonable velocity. The player can talk to Duffy about this tool, and discuss the velocity of the magnets. This will lead the player to being able to ask if the tool could punch holes through the tin roof covering the solar panels. Duffy will allow the player to use the tool to punch holes in the roof, allowing rays of light to fall on the solar panels. This will allow the solar panels to charge the generator. The generator powers up, but does not seem to open the door. Duffy notices that a connector is a converter is busted at the base of the generator. A new converter can be found in the nearby HOG. With this converter, the door can be opened. The generator needs to be interfaced with, via the phone that the player is carrying. With the door open, the player can proceed into the building. Scene 5 (“Desmond’s Pawn Shop”)   Items of Interest (IOI): Yes Puzzles: No Hidden Object Games:  Yes   Goal: -Explore this scene for anything of interest.   Possible actions: -The player can explore this shop -The player can interact with various items   -The player can interact with a Painting to get a clue -The player can explore a HOG in this scene to receive a critical item (converter) -The player can return to Scene 5 Notes: -An IOI can be found in the HOG in this scene (converter). -The painting is an IOI that, when interacted with, shows that the artist is “Jennifer Barrister”. The player can also flip the painting around for a message that reads; “I knew you’d come looking for answers here first, in your shop. Find the place where the two lines converge. The place we parted every morning and reunited every evening. There lies a room with a key pad lock. The code is simple, but only you could know it. Remember what you said to me when you decided to open the shop here in Astoria? You said, “Location, location, location.” Turn the painting back when you are done. I don’t want someone… or something following you.         END OF DEMO         So - do you like it?   Let me know if you'd like additional information, or what you think about the potential of a project like this! I am open to anything, be it interest in helping, or just thoughts and opinions. PM me or reply in this thread. Thanks!
  15. Ah, I see sunandshadow. Thanks for that heads up.   Hmmm, interesting twist, Stormynature. One I will certainly keep in mind. Thanks.