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Briiian Tsui

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  1.   Yes, Euclid is still in development. judging from the publications though, it doesn't sound like its far from beta. 
  2. So if your game has 2D character illustrations and you want to kick it up a notch with the least amount of extra resource, this is what Live2D offers you:       Pros: - Uses 2D images as material, a 1024 x 1024 px texture material (like a UV map) can build you a ready-to-animate mock-3D interactive model.  - Has SDK for Unity (and AfterEffect) - Highly retains the 2D art quality, your 3D model will result the same as how your 2D artist drew it - Your 2D artist can learn it in a week (or your 3D modeler can probably learn it quicker) - No need for rigging or modelling, no need for 3D settings or lightings. No need for pipe-lining, just Live2D > Unity - Animations and Expressions are recyclable; build up one model, apply to all others, and tweak from there if needed - Is not restricted to human characters, let it be a tree, mech, particle effects, or pug.  - The free version is sufficient for indie game usage (generally speaking)     Cons: - Currently limited to +/- 30 degree horizontally, cuz its not a full-3D model  - Small user community (English technical support from the official is sufficient though)       Here's a link to download and try:  http://www.live2d.com/cubism2-1/en.html     Here's a link to their retail product showcase, most games are on PSP/PSVita and mobile: http://www.live2d.com/en/showcase       The reason why I'm sharing is because I'm probably the only existing Youtube tutorial maker in English. The user community is small and I could learn faster and further if there are more users to exchange experience with. Also I'm starting to get invitations to indie game projects, and me alone can't participate in that many, so I hope to reach and help new learners to help with the demand.   My tutorial channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/imst                                                                                                               For the remaining of this post, I'll share some showcases.   This is a short intro from DigInfo 3 years ago. Note that a lot has been improved since then. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrLnF7CQ8Ac          This is more recent from DigInfo, showing Live2D Euclid (full-3D) along with Oculus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SMDLnC-cMU         The official teaser video for Euclid: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMI_augunA4         This is my WIP, working with a voice clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mERe5xFBIoo         One and only indie game in English that i know of using Live2D: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVHOfTVTexE          Someone else's example:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQhb8Yf-jX8         Official example of a mobile game featuring Unity-chan (official Japan Unity mascot character):  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njQB259UlPA           Or check out the official game:   Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=jp.cybernoids.shizuku&hl=en   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grzAbtw4zdI                                                                                                              tldr: a software that magically turns your 2D character into animated-3D, easy to learn, quick to make.          If anyone's interested (or your team's artist) to learn Live2D let me know, I'll help with the best I could. 
  3. I just want to share my functional prototype (its fun if you're a mecha fan!) and the story as a beginner programmer.   So I wanted to build a game but I didn't know any programming. I did take a course on javascript 101 in my first year some 8 years ago, but then I failed it.. But with Google Spreadsheet and little bit of Google App script, I managed to pull this off over a terribly painful two weeks. To be honest, I still don't know how to work with arrays... but I'm getting there!   Here's the link to the file. It is View-only, so please make a copy into your Google Drive before playing: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1pD8OXn7AF3-rzO8AN6pOyEZZg9bQC9fckku3KkmeZ74/edit?usp=sharing   - This is a mecha battle online game (1 vs 1) runs on Google Spreadsheet. - The battle system is a simultaneous 2-steps turn-base battle. Each side decides the next 2 actions, and then the game executes them in order. - The game is about customizing your mech, choosing weapons, and wreck your opponent. Destroy opponent's main body part and you win. Destroying other parts would gain you great advantage.   You need to change the sharing access before inviting a friend into your game. For step-by-step instruction please go to this link: http://imgur.com/a/dmQtX   The concept art and drafts: http://imgur.com/a/gIzGH     I'm not sure what my next step is. While I could pick up proper java/ C and then Unity, but with the amount of artwork waiting for me ahead I'll probably find a real programmer to partner with...    Anyhow! I don't even have friends to share my game with cuz no one is into mecha... even less into turn-base... So if any of you interested to give it a try and enjoy it, let me know about your experience! Duel with someone! (I'm fairly confident the game is balanced... "fairly") Feel free to play around with the source, but its in such a gory mess, you'd probably just back away from it... Hope you have a good game!  
  4.   I've checked that out, but i cant find the MAU DAUs, and I emailed the staffs, they replied "since apple store and google play dont give out MAU DAU anymore" so they don't offer those numbers.
  5. sorry i didn't make it clear, i want to look up the MAU and DAU metrics of other games out there. 
  6. I'm a social game app developer. I need to keep an eye on the chart movements for iOS and Android apps, and I use to rely on appdata.com. I don't need micro analytic in revenue, I just need to know the MAU and DAUs. Recently Appdata changed, it requires paid subscription in order to know ANY numbers at all, and its $595 per month, and I can't afford that.   Where could I get MAU and DAU metrics for free or an affordable price?   Edit: Clarify - I want to look up MAU and DAU of other games in the iOS and Android market.
  7.   I use pretty basic brushes, round with some soft edge but not too soft. I'm not sure how others do, i'm sure some pros develop a set of customized for universal purposes, but basic should get you through the beginner ~ mediocre stage.    Most artists I learned from start with dull and dark color and then work their way to the other end of the contrast. i find it easier that way to capture the feeling as I go. I usually have some idea what the part is going to be like before I start moving my pen, but half way though it always turns out different (since i'm not skilled enough yet), but then on the spot I capture a feeling how it would turn out in 3D (including volume and texture), then I continue to explore whatever is there. So you're right, it sorta give me a lighting suggestion.
  8. this is my work:  http://youtu.be/jVSHt2XPWIs   I use Sai instead of Corel Turn the opacity down to 80~90%, a 10~15% of color blending, that brush would handle most of it. Along with a 90~95% soft end eraser would do. lso paint in 200~300% size canvas of what is meant to be seen. 
  9. as a gamer, hardcore competitive gamers don't like luck to be influencing more than 0.01~5% . the more luck there is the less skill-based it is. although we'd be happy to land a critical hit and change the tide of the battle, but if it happens too often we'd only feel like, "if we lose its cuz we didn't have luck, nothing to be learned from; if we win its cuz of luck, nothing to be proud of".    as for majority gamers, they like slot machine basis and skill doesn't matter. rig the system so they would only win after an amount of repetitive attempts, and make sure no one wins the jackpot right after someone else did. there's a specific mathematical formula for stimulating the players that would drive them nuts and pay the most, but i do not possess that knowledge.
  10. a good presentation can change the players' thoughts from "terribly complicated design" to "uber interesting". but of course its very difficult cuz most players dont have the patience to go through a lot of tutorial / tips.   it sounds very chinese medicine knowledge btw, is that where your heading to? 
  11. I'd not worry about a game without story / lore. Players can make sense of the environment. just by seeing the graphics and designs would build a story setting in mind, its an automated process, a natural habit. I wouldn't speak for all. And always an option for you, is to release a game without story first, then if it really sells, release an expansion that implements quests. Although, a single player world like that makes you lonely, when you dont even have NPC to interact with.   The concern remaining is the fact that there are too many out there. Examples include The Blockheads (iOS) and Terraria. All you need is just ONE selling point that makes yours different from the rest, and its an experience the majority could not find elsewhere, then you'd hit the jackpot,   What other similar games on mobile have not succeeded to do, is refined control. The android ver of minecraft failed completely. Blockheads tried to improve that, but i haven't tested it nor heard feedbacks. So my personal opinion is if you can design the game control / GUI that is comfortable and efficient on android, you'd win my heart.
  12. I happen to know a Taiwan based artist community and I am here to offer some networking. I am currently recruiting artists over there, and this is where all the portfolios are located:   https://www.dropbox.com/sh/1ay98mx01l8fqq6/YDj1yUwTKo   They speak minimal English, so I am taking up the role of the mediator.    About them: > They are mostly located in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China. > To give an estimate, the refined painting as seen in the portfolios take them 4 hrs in average. Designing including researching might vary between 1~3 hrs. Single character portrait usually takes 1~2 hrs. A character sprite sheet for pixel art takes 1~2 hrs, animated.   > Some are experienced - had worked for paid position or hobbyist projects. > Some are looking for paid jobs only, some are fine with share / loyalty, and some just want a working experience with foreign groups on their portfolio and are fine without pay.  > Their style are mostly manga-oriented, some do traditional art as well, but their portfolio does not show all of their ability. They may provide the style you need upon request, like pixel art or vector art. > Very few knows 3D modelling. Most are capable of 2D frame-by-frame animation.  > If its an unpaid or share paid project, they prefer short projects as they're not competent in committing long term. Pay by asset is most preferable. > A signed contract is necessary - mailed or faxed.   If you are interested in recruiting any of them, email (imstudio -at- gmail -dot- com) me or msg me here and let me know 1) who you want to learn more about, or would you want to ask those who are interested in your project to submit related samples.  2) brief about your project: - gameplay, - setting, - wanted style, - work load, - team history, - length, - compensation, - brief marketing plan (if you have one),  - when you need to make a decision, - desired starting date.       ** Please do not contact them personally, as that would confuse them.  And of course, don't use the pics in the portfolio without asking. **
  13. just my personal opinion:   i'd enjoy more the first game mode with just 3x3, or 4x4 max. I think it'd become more speed-feeling, right now its overwhelming. Also smaller scale sounds more marketable on platforms like android / iOS. 
  14.   It's not as bad as it sounds,true that if a game focuses only on this kind of system a player quickly loses interest, but it allows for players to pick up an play with out needing to do a tutorial. The trick is to expand on the idea and to add depth, like pokémon, any player can play it and understand it,but would have hard time winning the game from the start if you gave them the correct level pokémon(Then again some are just lucky). Strategy games also often uses a rock paper system and then adds units that don't follow these rules, this gives new players some ground to stand on while working on there strategy. I feel it is important to have this feature, because research shows that player will only play a new game for about two weeks before moving to a new game(Even if thy didn't complete the previous game),thy would then often go back to the previous game and play it again when thy have no other games or have grown bored with there new games.(There are exceptions, games that emerge players often lasts longer,but can any one truly say thy have been playing the same game for years with out uninstalling it once?) So because players go back to there old games you shouldn't punish them by forcing to start from the beginning just to relearn how to play,that is how I personally feel. I see what you mean.  Indeed its not completely worthless, but i think its just some games went overboard with that to a point that player has zero hope when their spec is by default in disadvantage. If i came in with "scissors" and my opponent with "rock", perhaps that makes our power difference 1:9, but still if the system allows me 5% chance to win based on my skill, 5% luck factor, i'd still say its a fair game.