Ruszny

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About Ruszny

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  1. What Language Do I Use?

    This sentence just made my day But still, so true, even though learning some basics of Assembly could actually help someone understand some basic concepts
  2. Thanks, that gives me some ideas :)   The problem though still remains: how do you think up an idea that is neither too complex and resource intense but at the same time useable?
  3. About TCP/UDP, read this article: http://gafferongames.com/networking-for-game-programmers/udp-vs-tcp/ It describes the cons and pros of TCP, and even though he strongly advices against TCP, RTS games have a reason for using it.
  4. Heyo guys!   Last time I just kicked in the doors of a thread, so let me start with the introduction. I'm 19 years old, last year high school student, a gamer since a young age (can't say, was I like 5 years old?) and a programmer since a year ago, mostly learnt and worked with C# and Windows Phone 7, though I've already learn some C++. I've already worked on a few mobile applications and also a game before for a customer (ThinkInvisible for Windows Phone), however I want to design and create my own game - I guess you have to start somewhere.   I want to create a simple, yet entertaining and interactive game that may be even a bit unique - well I know, this is a kinda hard task. I can also create simple graphics myself, both 2D and 3D, as long as it doesn't need a graphics tablet. I feel that I'm already over the level of a simple pong, but not where I can make cost-effective pathfinding, or a good AI. Physics seem not to be much of a problem as long as I don't have to rely on a 3D engine for collision detection. I've already done some experimenting with LAN and UDP as well successfully, and apart from taking a tad lot of time to create the system that synchronizes the devices, it seems easy to use.   From trials and my own works I already know how serious a problem it is to create a game - many times even some ideas that sound simple can become extremely annoying and demanding in a short timeframe. So I'm here to ask you: how should I start designing a game (for now for mobile phones, since I don't thing simple games are fit for PCs) without going overboard with resources or advanced, high-demanding algorithms, like pathfinding, which appearently eats away a mobile phone easily, and such?
  5. Haha thanks, silly me forgot about extending the game after release - not that it would be such a big game, so I think recompiling is not that much of a problem, but wonders happen, and rewriting then would be painful -.-' Well, I'm still a beginner in these matters and I've never experienced a 10 minutes compilation time :3 I'm trying to aim low since if I finish this game, it'll be only my second game - the first one was a simple logical game, not much of a problem... I hope I can finish it, though I still don't know where and what kind of graphis I'll implement... But, you know, you have to start somewhere ^^
  6. Heyo guys, I have a question about the most optimal solution when it comes to developing games in an object oriented environment (C# atm - I'm trying to go with C++, but I still have a long way to go...)   So, I'm having a base Unit class. The question is wether I should add a string or enum marking the type of the unit -in this case I'd use functions to create the proper unit-, or create inheritors of the base class, then create instances. I'm the units will have different damage reduction functions, though I can solve that as well using delegates.   Also, I've heard that you should try to separate the graphics from the rest of the game, so it's easier to maintain and port. But in case of a 3D game (I'm not trying to do that anyway, just out of curiosity) how can you solve this, when you need the 3D engine to handle collisions?