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Bokke

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About Bokke

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  1. Bokke

    Where to Start

    I have written a small blogpost concerning an initial tetris game on Android (Java) and I've put the code up on Github, maybe it is somewhat helpful for you.   Personally, I learned a lot from Beginning Android Games (it isn't free, but good value for money imho)
  2. I'm currently in the process of writing a tetris game. On a small scale project like this, I'm trying to keep the KISS principle, nevertheless I often find that I need to refactor the code because otherwise it becomes unreadable...   I also noticed some design flaws that I'll leave in the code (e.g. I didn't consider the field where the blocks fall down as a gameobject, which I should have in hindsight). It's an experience I'll take with me into my next project, but I won't fix it in the current codebase as it is not a "showstopper".   One should always consider the tradeoffs and take the one that moves the project ahead and doesn't delay it needlessly... The time you take polishing your code, is time lost where you could be learning about some new concepts. E.g.: in my case, refactoring to add another gameobject for the field with falling blocks, would be less valuable to me then learning about the best practices of sprites, because my tetrisgame could use some code where it is easy to render a rectangle with a specific texture (because I'll certainly need it again in this project and I'll need it in my next project).
  3. Wouldn't it be a possibility to log your accelerometer with time information on your android phone and then use the log as input to your virtual device?
  4. I started of with those tutorials from developer.android.com as well, now I'm working my way through Beginning Android Games (which is a good read and discusses a lot of topics (at a beginners level))   I did note though that you refer to OpenGL as having optimized physics, but please understand, OpenGL is there only for your rendering and will not provide you with any physics. You'll probably encounter OpenGL ES in your Android endeavours, and not OpenGL (Even though Nvidia's Logan project, scheduled for the near future will provide you with a full blown OpenGL implementation, but so far I know there aren't any other OpenGL Android devices out there).   If you are looking for a physics engine, then Box2D might be something you are looking for.   If you just want to have your game out, you might want to have a look at libGDX as VIkato already proposed. Then you'll be able to hit the ground running and you won't have to develop your engine from the ground up. Since you'll also need to consider input management, your game loop, animation, sound...   Anyway, good luck!
  5.   You are absolutely right, the subject has been treated rather dodgy. I remember how the OpenGL Red Book, 7th edition had the example of a rotating square, where a "ghosting"-effect was visible when you rendered with only one colorbuffer. A double-buffered framebuffer resolved this quite nicely.   I'll have a look if I can improve this article with some pictures/figures to make it somewhat clearer. In the meantime, I'll leave it as an exercise to the reader     I decided not to modify the article, nevertheless, you can see the effect of double-buffering (No Ghosting) versus single-buffering (Ghosting) in the following 2 youtube videos I just uploaded: No ghosting Ghosting
  6.   You are absolutely right, the subject has been treated rather dodgy. I remember how the OpenGL Red Book, 7th edition had the example of a rotating square, where a "ghosting"-effect was visible when you rendered with only one colorbuffer. A double-buffered framebuffer resolved this quite nicely.   I'll have a look if I can improve this article with some pictures/figures to make it somewhat clearer. In the meantime, I'll leave it as an exercise to the reader :)
  7.   I do agree that the blending stage is of high importance in the current graphics and I was in doubt of writing something or not. In the end, I decided not to. The blending stage can be disabled in OpenGL, it isn't mandatory and I felt that it would therefore add an additional layer of needless "complexity" in how pixels "come to be" (which was the main goal of this article)   I don't think we should compare the shader stages to the blending stage, as for example the geometry shader certainly has its merits!
  8. Bokke

    Shaders - HLSL - SampleLevel()

    Thanks, I should have read the msdn more closely:   The Format of the texture is indeed defined as DXGI_FORMAT_R32G32B32A32_FLOAT. I was too much focused on the fact that it was a Texture1D and ignored to see that an element could as well have multiple dimensions...   As for the float3 vs float4: I only need a random x, y and z component for v, so no use for a float4 variable.
  9. Could someone help me figure out why a float3 is being returned in the following HLSL line? float3 v = gRandomTex.SampleLevel(gTriLinearSam, u, 0);   Now, gRandomTex, gTriLinearSam and u are defined as follows: Texture1D gRandomTex; SamplerState gTriLinearSam {     Filter = MIN_MAG_MIP_LINEAR;     AddressU = WRAP;     AddressV = WRAP; } float u = 1.0f; //Actually it is not a constant, but just for the example, I set it to 1.0f          
  10. Bokke

    Loading PNG files

    Hello,   I propose you have a look at D3DX11CreateShaderResourceViewFromFile Since the D3D10ImageFileFormat is mentioned for D3DX10CreateShaderResourceViewFromFile, however that its not for the D3D11, I still do expect that D3DX11_IMAGE_FILE_FORMAT holds: D3DX11_IFF_PNG Is probably what you are looking for.
  11. I was wondering why Nvidia PhysX doesn't have the NxCharacter.dll included in "C:\Program Files (x86)\NVIDIA Corporation\PhysX\Common".   I wanted to make it a bit easier for myself by adding "C:\Program Files (x86)\NVIDIA Corporation\PhysX\Common" to my PATH env variable. Now, since NxCharacter.dll is not in the "C:\Program Files (x86)\NVIDIA Corporation\PhysX\Common", I got interrupted by a runtime error when I wanted to run my program after compilation since NxCharacter.dll could not be found.   What would I do best to have NxCharacter.dll linked to my program? -> Should I just copy NxCharacter.dll to "C:\Program Files (x86)\NVIDIA Corporation\PhysX\Common"? -> Should I just copy NxCharacter.dll to my debug folder? -> Should I just copy all required PhysX Dlls to my debug folder and remove "C:\Program Files (x86)\NVIDIA Corporation\PhysX\Common" from my PATH?   Maybe as a more general question: how would your application install PyshX?   Thanks for any help, I'm in doubt about what would be the nicest way of doing things.  
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