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EricMarsh

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  1. Do we just post it in this thread or do we make a new thread with a tag of some sort?
  2. I guess this would be akin to something like WoW's scrolling combat text; damage and healing numbers popping up on screen located near their point of origin, etc. If I'm not mistaken, most games render those to their HUD, same layer of their general GUI, as two-dimensional entities. You might want to check out some of the modding communities for popular MMOs to see if they have any of their source code open so you can poke around and see how it works.
  3. Another avenue is releasing the product as a free thing with source material being available to those who want to fiddle around with it themselves while offering your own pre-built addins for a fee. Like how some web theme and javascript sites operate; the base kit is readily available and it's all Javascript or C# or C++, but if the consumer wants to get a package deal that has more functionality, they can pay $5-$20, all based on how much extra functionality there is and how much work you did to implement it.
  4. Teaching writing is tricky. If it were me, I'd invest a couple of weeks in a course to classical theatre and its transitions to current media, what actions and plots got left behind and what new ideas emerged.   I'd definitely take a week to overview the monomyth/hero's journey, outlined here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monomyth   Using the monomyth structure, begin to dissect current popular stories being told via stage, film, press, and game; requiring students to analyze three or four works they know by heart and fit it into the structure, pick their best one and exhibit it to the class for comparison; that'd only last a class session (1-2 hours), but would be a great exercise for their first attempt at writing their own, submitting a draft, a revision, and a final for presentation and grading.   But I only have an associate's degree in science, what do I know about curricula creation...
  5. Well, if everything is so toss-up, why not stick close to the base?   It's a sandbox kind of experience?   "Starbox".   Not only is it familiar when considering game-types, but it's just one letter shy of a multi-million dollar franchise without getting anywhere close to Nintendo's game design.
  6. There's a program out there very much like this on Steam, though its price tag is a deterrent for most of us who are on a shoestring budget for things we can readily make do without; the program is named articy: draft SE by nevigo.   http://www.nevigo.com/?id=47   Steam has demo videos of it; so if you'd still like to work on it as a free alternative, I doubt they'd mind much if you used their demonstration as inspiration (otherwise, we'd all be prohibitively in debt to the giants that came before us; upon the shoulders of which we so brazenly stand, using their concepts to strengthen our own).
  7. Fixed the problem.   Turns out I was using an older version of the .FBX.   Lesson learned!
  8. Programs: Unity 3.5.2, 3dsMax 2012 Problem: Two of five animations are not playing appropriately. Language: Javascript I have a gun with an animation imported via .FBX from 3dsMax 2012. The animation from 3dsMax runs from frames 0-190 and contains the following animations that I've separated inside of Unity 3.5.2: Frames 0-9 LMBShoot Frames 9-18 RMBShoot Frames 20-50 Reload Frames 50-62 LMBBurst Frames 62-190 idle My problem arises in executing the LMBBurst animation and having the idle play constantly while no other animations are playing; the other three animations (LMBShoot, RMBShoot, and Reload) all work when they're called upon in the script, however. I have a separate script for RMBShoot, which works fine considering it has no alternative fire option. Both of these scripts are on an Empty Game Object named "BarrelNode", which is a child of the gun root that contains all of the animations, allowing me to freely relocate the origin of the particle effects. "Gun" and "AmmoCapsule" are separate objects used in the animations to simulate wrist rotation and ammo container rotation and repositioning animations. Here's an example of the heirarchy: First Person Controller Graphics Main Camera Weapon FullGun BarrelNode Gun AmmoCapsule And the code, which you may use for your own devices if you wish; thanks for the help: var ammoMax = 21; //Maximum ammo per magazine var damage = 5.0; //Damage caused per projectile var ammoCarried = 105; //Amount of ammo carried, allows for pickups to replenish ammunition var ammoCount = ammoMax; //ammoCount = current ammunition in magazine var burstFireAmount = 3; //Ensures 3 shots per burst var burstFireDelay = .1; //Delay between individual shots in burst private var ammoRemainder = 0; //Hidden comparison variable to clean up code private var bBurstFire = false; //Burst Fire Toggle Variable private var isFiring = false; //Is Firing Boolean Variable to restrict overlapping fire, simulate real gun public var dryFireAudio : AudioClip; //play audio of a click instead of normal gunshot function Start() { //Don't know if this is necessary or not audio.clip = dryFireAudio; //This isn't working, apparently. transform.parent.animation.CrossFade("idle", .1); } function Update() { //Check if isFiring is true, if not, proceed, if it is, do nothing if(isFiring != true) { //Input Manager has "Fire1" set to Left Ctrl and Mouse0, left mouse click if(Input.GetButtonDown("Fire1")) { //Check if burst fire is active, if not, proceed to fire normally if(bBurstFire!=true) { isFiring = true; NormalFire(); isFiring = false; } //If burst fire is active, proceed to burst fire else { BurstFire(); } } //Reload function call if(Input.GetButtonDown("Reload")) { //This works, plays the reload animation, yield WaitForSeconds() in Reload() is hard-coded for reload animation duration atm transform.parent.animation.CrossFade("Reload", .1, PlayMode.StopAll); Reload(); } //Button press for BurstFire/SingleShot toggle if(Input.GetButtonDown("ChangeFireType")) { if(bBurstFire == false) { bBurstFire = true; } else { bBurstFire = false; } } } //Attempt at forcing idle to play, doesn't work. In theory, this should check every frame whether an animation is playing and, if there is none, start the idle sequence else { if(!animation.IsPlaying) transform.parent.animation.Play("idle", PlayMode.StopAll); } } function Reload() { //Basic arithmetic to check for remaining ammo supply and refill current supply with carried supply, checks for running out of ammo isFiring = true; ammoRemainder = ammoCarried - (ammoMax - ammoCount); if(ammoRemainder >= 0) { ammoCarried -= (ammoMax - ammoCount); ammoCount = ammoMax; yield WaitForSeconds(reloadTime); } else if(ammoCarried > 0) { ammoCount += ammoCarried; ammoCarried = 0; yield WaitForSeconds(reloadTime); } else { } isFiring = false; } //burstFireAmount Shot Function function BurstFire() { isFiring = true; //This also isn't working, apparently. transform.parent.animation.Play("LMBBurst", PlayMode.StopAll); if(ammoCount>0) { for(var i = 0; i < burstFireAmount; i++) { NormalFire(); yield WaitForSeconds(burstFireDelay); } } else { audio.Play(); } isFiring = false; } //Single Shot Function function NormalFire() { if(ammoCount > 0) { if(bBurstFire != true) transform.parent.animation.CrossFade("LMBShoot", .1, PlayMode.StopAll); var instantiatedProjectile : Rigidbody = Instantiate (projectile, transform.position, transform.rotation); instantiatedProjectile.velocity = transform.TransformDirection ( Vector3 ( 0, 0, speed)); Physics.IgnoreCollision (instantiatedProjectile.collider, transform.root.collider); ammoCount--; } else { if(bBurstFire != true) audio.Play(); } }