• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

DrSuperSocks

Members
  • Content count

    24
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

258 Neutral

About DrSuperSocks

  • Rank
    Member

Personal Information

  • Location
    Hawaii
  1. A very good point. I can't believe something that obvious never occurred to me. I'll rip apart my convenient .a file and keep everything separate. Thanks!
  2. So, I've been writing a game engine for a while now alongside several hobby games. It gets developed as each game needs it to have more features. I'm now in the process of refactoring the code and cleaning up the project.   It depends on all sorts of fun things, like glew, SFML, CEGUI, and Box2D. As of now, I compile all of my dependencies with the API so as to have just one .a file to link with. I realize that doing this doesn't really dodge all of the bullets, since I still have to point to all of the headers of my dependencies.   So, my question - should I continue to compile my dependencies with my API, or should I leave it up to the user to link the dependencies?   EDIT: I'm asking about best practices, because I've seen a lot of different APIs do it both ways.
  3. You can check out IndieDB and its store: Desura. I think they already have some good features.   http://www.indiedb.com/ http://www.desura.com/
  4. You need to multiply your speed, in seconds, by the delta time in seconds. So, if your update function is receiving the delta time in milliseconds, divide the milliseconds by 1000 to get your delta time in seconds. That, or you could fix your time step as Matias said, which you'll have to do anyway if you want to implement good multiplayer. The link he provided is very good.   On top of that stuff, your logic looks a bit off. So, you have a velocity variable that moves your ship based on delta time, but then when ship controls are pressed you don't even touch the velocity variable and just move your ship by hand ignoring delta time.
  5. If you want the tiled look of Mario, look up tile scrolling. The basic idea is you have a 2D array of integers that represent different tile types, and you draw the portion of that 2D array that is on the screen based on your camera position.   for (int x = left; x < right; x++) { for (int y = top; y < bottom; y++) { // Draw map[y][x] tile at (x*tileW, y*tileH) } }
  6. Thanks, Tom, your links are very helpful.     Sure, Google's lousy at finding unknown unknowns, but if you are working on a project and Googling a specific problem, there are no unknowns. It's my fault for poorly phrasing what I mean. I'm not saying you should learn through Google, I'm saying that you should learn through hands-on projects with Google as a helping hand when you get stuck. Hence, anything you don't already know can be found on Google. For instance, let's say I'm writing a game that needs a procedural height map. Oh no, I don't know anything about that, I'll Google procedural world generation. Suddenly, I discover perlin noise, fractal noise, and even some sweet example code! Google saves the day again! Good luck getting your professor to talk about things like that.   I asked my professor about how to get a pointer to an operator member function (I was binding my vector class to the Squirrel scripting language and wanted to be able to use arithmetic operators). We searched through the C++ textbook to no avail. Here's what he told me after: "Uggghhh.... Google it." Then, I Googled for about half an hour and found the answer.   The more I think about it, the sillier it seems that companies value a CS degree more than proven experience for entry level jobs. "Oh yeah, let's not hire the kid with tons of proven development experience and several completed products in various areas and no degree. Let's hire the fresh college grad who knows how to implement the binary search algorithm and maybe even make a Tetris clone - he has a degree!"    Anyway, I'm sorry, the pride, it gets to my head. It's a disease. I'll stop now. I'll go do my homework and register for my classes for next semester Thanks all for your valuable input! You have knocked the sense right back into me - giving up my scholarship for some exciting new work opportunities would be a terrible idea.
  7. Don't know of any tutorials, but I'd be willing to cough up the code to the 3D level editor for my hobbyist game engine. It doubles as a project manager too! I made it compile my code into the actual game as well as a plugin for the editor that allows you to place objects with game-specific functionality into the scene. Anyway, if you want the source, I'd be happy to share it. I need to go in and refactor the code before I feel comfortable making it open source :P It uses my custom game engine, which uses Irrlicht for rendering, along with wxWidgets for UI.
  8. I accept that the without a degree you will below the majority with a degree, but doesn't the portfolio imply work experience? What I mean by a portfolio IS work experience. I do work half-time as a programmer at a biology lab to pay my rent. (I've hated biology so, so much ever since my high school biology class). Isn't having hands-on experience and no degree better than having a shiny degree with no hands-on experience? From what I've gathered from my first year here at my university, it seems like all of the graduating seniors have a ton of theoretical knowledge regarding math and computers without the slightest idea of how to apply it to create a functional product.
  9. Sure.  Just like everything you don't already know has always been available at libraries.  The medium doesn't change the fact that unless you know what you need, you're not going to have a lot of success looking for it.  Prepare your mind.   But all the information is absolutely not available in a local library. You might be able to find a handful of books on C programming, 9 out of 10 of which are outdated. On the internet, you can find tutorials, videos, open source projects, etc. I don't agree that you can't find knowledge without someone telling you where to look. I didn't learn to code with a professor holding my hand and telling me where to look for 8 years, I learned by doing projects and searching Google when a problem came up. I think we live in a new age where anyone can learn to code as long as they have half a brain, a bunch of spare time, and an internet connection.   That is part of the reason it exists.   A degree by itself provides evidence that you can do the job well.   That evidence is not just that you know the topics to a minimal level.  One bit of evidence is that you can stick with a project that you may not always enjoy.   I feel that a portfolio filled with completed projects proving hands-on experience is a lot more valuable than a piece of paper saying that I memorized a bunch of facts for a few exams. All a degree proves is that you passed a few tests - and they're not very hard tests. Out of all the senior CS students at my University, maybe 2 can code at a professional level. One of them has terrible grades because he crams himself with 24 credits.   Anyway, just my humble opinions, I won't drop my schooling.
  10. Alright, thanks for knocking some sense into me, guys.         I appreciate that!   And thanks, Katie, you have a lot of very persuasive points. That image of me looking at a shiny poster board :'( Haha.   I do not like this CS-degree-required filter, but I suppose I will just have to roll with it. At least I'm all done with the required math :D Now I just get to take the Math that I want to take.
  11. Hey all, if you want to skip my background, my question is: Do I need a college degree to have a successful career as a programmer (primarily as a game programmer).   If you want to tailor your response to be specific to my situation, I would be very grateful! Here is my background info:   I'm 18 years old, and I've been programming since I was 10 years old. My dad handed me an ancient book on C programming and told me that if  I learned to program, I could make my own video games. Now what 10-year-old doesn't want to make a video game? I hated reading of course, so I just skipped straight to the code examples. When I dried that book out, I moved to the vast ocean of Google to learn everything I know about C++ today. Now, I'm finishing up my freshman year of college as a CS student. I work part-time as a programmer for a genetic research facility under the USDA to pay my rent.   Most of my experience is in game development, but I also enjoy artificial intelligence (mainly artificial neural networks), massively parallel GPU programming, robotics, and OS-level programming (I wrote a simple OS that went into pmode and loaded a simple shell back in my junior year of high school. Bootloader in Assembly, kernel in C).   I learned Java in a weekend and made an Android game the following month, and you can find that in my signature. I also wrote 2 game engines that I use for all of my hobby projects - one for 2D and the other for 3D. Getting amped up to use my Fission engine in this weekend's Ludum Dare!!! This will be my 5th time doing it   That about sums up my background. The reason I'm asking this is because I'm really not enjoying the classroom part of college so much. I love the living on my own, do whatever I want, lots of free time, do some cool projects aspect of college, but so far I've learned little to nothing in my CS classes. And it seems nowadays anything you don't already know can be found on Google.   Also, it's worth mentioning that I have a full-ride scholarship to my University. I guess the obvious answer should be to take the free college, but I just feel so unsatisfied - like I'm just here for that piece of paper.   I am finishing up Calculus 3 and Linear Algebra this semester though (2 more weeks!!!!)! I didn't need Calc 3, but Linear Algebra is the last math requirement for a CS degree at my college   ANYWAY, question: Would dropping college for a full time job in the industry of my dreams be a terrible life decision?
  12. Very cool, I would be interested! I had have a path-finding system set up in my game engine, but level designers have to add the waypoints manually. This would definitely be useful to me
  13. Yes, it's a hot joinable game. Currently, each object get's it's own packet in the initial world send, and I mass send all of them at once.   Here is the relevant code:   void NetworkManager::send(sf::Packet &packet, int connectorID, int excludeID, bool reliable) { sf::Packet finalPacket; //finalPacket << sf::Int8(0); finalPacket.append(packet.getData(), packet.getDataSize()); // Create the enet packet unsigned int flags = 0; if (reliable) flags |= ENET_PACKET_FLAG_RELIABLE; ENetPacket *enetPacket = enet_packet_create(finalPacket.getData(), finalPacket.getDataSize(), flags); if (mType == NetworkType::CLIENT) // Clients send data to server only { enet_host_broadcast(mHost, 0, enetPacket); } else if (connectorID > 0) // It's a server and the client is specified. Tell only that client! { enet_peer_send(findConnector(connectorID)->mPeer, 0, enetPacket); } else // It's a server and the client is unspecified. Broadcast to everyone { if (excludeID > 0) { for (unsigned int i = 0; i < mConnectors.size(); i++) { if (mConnectors[i]->mID != excludeID && mConnectors[i]->mPeer) enet_peer_send(mConnectors[i]->mPeer, 0, enetPacket); } } else enet_host_broadcast(mHost, 0, enetPacket); } } void NetworkManager::sendSceneCreation(int connectorID, int excludeID, bool reliable) { for (unsigned int i = 0; i < SceneManager::get()->getCurrentScene()->getGameObjects().size(); i++) { if (SceneManager::get()->getCurrentScene()->getGameObjects()[i]->getSyncNetwork()) sendGameObject(SceneManager::get()->getCurrentScene()->getGameObjects()[i], connectorID, excludeID, reliable); } } void NetworkManager::sendGameObject(GameObject *object, int connectorID, int excludeID, bool reliable) { sf::Packet packet; packet << PacketType::CREATE_OBJECT; object->serialize(packet); send(packet, connectorID, excludeID, reliable); }     Thanks for the suggestions, I'll cram stuff into bigger packets. Could you recommend a good maximum packet size? I'll make it adjustable and play with it, but I'd like a ball park This networking stuff is all very new to me.   And thanks, nfactorial, I've also given sending only immediate surroundings a thought, and that will be very easy since I already have stuff to detect which planet you are currently on (you fight across many 2D planets). Edit: But also, in that regard, sending only the current surroundings is kind of the scenario at hand, since I only have 2 planets in the game right now. I plan on having around 100 planets in an actual match.
  14. Hi all, I've been working on a sort of side-scrolling, shoot em up, RTS game for the past few weeks and am now confronting the issue of sending the game world to the client when it logs in. Right now, when the player logs in, the entire game world is sent all at once (each object gets it's own packet) over reliable UDP (I'm using enet). Originally, I had the game world all in one packet, but the packet was too big to send in just one packet (it's like 50kb). Right now, it works fine if you have fast internet, but with slow internet (50 kilobytes per second) the client will hang there for a very long time receiving only a few game objects a second and never really receives the entire game world.   Any suggestions? I'm about to implement a system where it spreads the packets out over a few seconds, is that a good fix? Or are there fancy ways that would be better?
  15. In my game engine, networked objects are instantiated on both the client and the server, and components instantiated on either side can send messages to each other. Other than that, all packets are processed by the active game state. I'm currently trying to refine my networking and look for better methods, as I'm still pretty novice at network programming.