• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

NewAmbition

Members
  • Content count

    10
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

133 Neutral

About NewAmbition

  • Rank
    Member

Personal Information

  • Location
    South Africa
  1. Wow.   Only thing I can think of (If this is a unique character / one that's meant to stand out), is have something small but flashy.. Like a card (or note?) sticking outta his hat, or maybe even a small engraving on the end-metal-part of his belt.
  2.   My idea would lead to the interest being calculated per day/week. This means they will get the money at that time, and not over a longer period.   So the interest will be calculated with whatever is in their bank account at that time, and deposited in. This would lead the game to having an income stream.   But, the deeper we get into this, the less secure I feel about having money for free (wintertime) - as this wouldn't add value to the game. However, if the global currency starts at $1000000, and there are 10 players, this money would need to be split evenly between companies and players. If more players start the game, more money needs to be added to this global repository.   In my mind, this 'free money' would do just that. So the user would be added to the game with a set amount of money, and interest will take care of the rest.
  3. Interesting read, Mratthew..   I'll definitely look into making the bank element much less of a hassle than it is. I don't like the idea of the game rewarding you because you get to play more than me...   The reason you need to come back (primarily) is so that you can keep your account secure, trace-back any hacking attempt, or hack something for yourself. If I have life commitments, that shouldn't be a punishable offence (saying that because you have commitments, the game will not reward you in any way).   Although, as you said, I do need to challenge a person when they DO play. A harmony needs to be found - might just take some trial and error...   The user will be able to play as a protagonist (now), and as a company in future releases of the game. I have been finding ways of connecting users to their character, but so far have only found ways in a very base level..   Thanks again for your input, some very valid points you have there.
  4. Banks will have fees (per month or day - depending on interest calculation), as well as transaction fees.   The game has a very real RTS element, but the wait to do things will vary among users. I agree with interest caps. We can't have someone with a remarkably high bank account to buy anything just off the interest he receives.   There is no actual reward system for logging in at a certain time (although interest IF you logged in within a day sounds good), other than protecting yourself against the very real danger of another player.   I have no idea about bank capitalization or other forms besides standard interest.. So if someone wouldn't mind explaining just how to do so...   I've written a backround story for the game here: http://www.gamedev.net/topic/647160-newsretention-background-story-need-feedback/ If that will help bring some clarity to what I'm doing.
  5. For a game that relies on real-time strategy to play, when would be the best time to calculate interest on the players bank account?   For official banks, some would have an annual interest rate of about 9.5%. So is it feasible, for a daily calculation, to have an interest rate of (9.5 / 365)% ?   Would daily be too much? Players waiting for a weekly (I think monthly is way too long) might want a more immediate action to their money.
  6. Constructive feedback? That isnt a flame..? Thats a good start in any book :)   I've just posted a link (On top of the original post) that leads to a writeup of the story. I think that it may provide some clarity on the outcome. But for simplicity, the 'outcome' is ~anything~. It can be a document, or a bar of platinum. The story will explain it further.   Yes, you are correct. Templates are merely data holders. Anyone can have and use them, for different purposes.   In the initial release of the game, players can only be protagonists. However, not too long after, a user can choose to start and manage a company of their own. A company can be run by multiple people pooling their resources together - This will add dynamics of very well set protagonists buying shares into companies.   A 'user' is what all players will start off as. This paves a way for everyone to start equally, and have the same opportunities. Banks can provide whatever initial resources a player may need in the beginning. Companies and Protagonists differ from themselves only by the way they play. For a company, it can be that they offer very cheap services. Or one may be more secure than the other. Some companies can process faster than others, while some may be in 'better' standings with The Hall.   For protagonists, it will all be about the style of their play, how much disposable income and information they have, and how long they've been a member of The Hall for.     I need to say that I'm not expecting players to pay per month, pay for ?worthwhile/game changing upgrades, or pay for any penalties. I am creating this purely because I can, and because I love creating things for the community. IF players feel they want to give me any sort of monetary contribution (Which will primarily and foremost go toward upgrading the look, feel, and general style of the game, they will be able to donate **whatever amount** they feel is right.   For commitment, and based on my previous rant, the user isn't forced to play 24/7 just to get anywhere. Due to The Hall's rating system, a user is however needed to put in the appropriate amount of time to get anywhere worth being. Smaller jobs will be based on a 'single player' feel. It'll be dispensed by bots, and there may even be repeats. This is until user-run companies come into play.   The game is mainly governed by the players. While technically you can leave the game for a year without fear of loosing your account, I cannot promise some hacker never tried to break into it and take your money / information. You will be able to purchase some security though, if you feel you need to go on a 6 week holiday. There will be no game-based penalty for not playing. I dont believe that just because you've logged into the game for 6 days straight that you deserve a reward that could potentially overpower you. Any reward system will be based on jobs done, and how The Hall feels.       I am fully open to (non game breaking) ideas that I can incorporate. 
  7. The design for this story can be found here: http://www.gamedev.net/topic/647075-newsretention-feedback-on-the-concept/   History From the discovery of the Higgs Boson, scientists had set out to work on a device that could that could convert any matter to this Elementary Particle, and from that to any matter. Over the years – through a lot of trial and error, and from the increasing pressure from the decay of natural resources, a breakthrough led to the manufacture of this device, called ‘Merlin-S’. The original intention for Merlin-S was to be an Earth Saver. Space exploration was well underway, which lead to a very effective way of mining worthless material from other planets as a fuel. This in-turn created the very well-used opportunity to manufacture food, supplies, and any other commodities that were greatly needed.   To create something, scientists originally scanned what was needed, and created a direct replica of it. This was mainly because the data needed to produce a product was too large to be stored in any standard method. The process was slow, but it worked. After a few months, DNA storage became a possibility. The array of data needed for an object, known as a ‘Byton’, was decoded from an object, and stored on a couple of DNA strands. The strands –to increase the lifespan through time, transportation, and other various elements - were stored on an octagonal chip, no bigger than the human hand. Blank disks were known as templates.   Initially, large corporations invested in this technology hoping to bring an end to the need of natural resources, and to have the capability of creating anything that they needed. This then grew to satisfy military needs, and eventually sold out to smaller Processing Companies. The companies saw the potential gain in reselling the product to any citizen who could afford it. They would have to purchase a template physically, then purchase whatever item they wanted from an online store and download it to the template. They would then have to send it to a Processing Company of their choice for safe-holdings until it could be processed and the end product delivered. Users were prohibited (and largely did not have the means to) store the data locally. Over time, the world adopted this lifestyle into their routine. But, developers in the companies soon saw some loopholes in the system, which created a huge personal market if done right.   The age of the protagonist was born.   Protagonists were developers who found ways of re-coding templates to be able to create a completely different item. This allowed them to purchase very cheap Byton’s and change it to something much more valuable. The secret was kept between them, but like all news, eventually leaked out. When companies found out about the loops in the system, they invested heavily in external Security Systems to help protect their systems. These systems were vastly successful, and almost all of the original protagonists were removed from their position. Fortunately, they left some back doors open on the company's servers to be able to access them later.   Realising that they now had almost no stable income, and their names tarnished, they deployed a community of their own, to learn how to exploit the backdoors created in the systems. This lead to quite a bit of smaller companies going bankrupt – from lawsuits to not being able to afford security - as the protagonists moved in and destroyed files.   Larger companies sought to end their rivals by employing protagonists to do the dirty work for them. Whether it was to destroy company data, move Byton’s from one server to another, or find out about their customers banking details, protagonists were becoming a much needed part of any company. The community of original protagonists created a group known as ‘The Hall’. To hire a protagonist, a company would send a request to The Hall with details of the job at hand. The Hall would then allocate a protagonist with the appropriate inner rating to the task.   [hr]   For opinions I'd like to know if this is firstly believable? Does the story draw you in enough to finish it and maybe find out more?   Any pointers to changes or additions will be greatly welcome.
  8. Some good advice from my end would be to puck a language and master it.   For game development, users mostly go for C++ because its the fastest run-time language. Also, a lot of game engines rely on it to function. C# has a lot more libraries and general support -> But engines are much more limited.   Don't go big too soon. Having an idea for an MMO and trying to create it yourself will lead you to a shortfall. I've had first had experience with trying to create a team to do this too. As the pinned posts say - unless you have a lot of money (or are a game development studio), don't attempt that.   Start small, and work your way up. Allow yourself to grow rather than pushing yourself to be the best. Looking back now, I can see how foolish I was in the beginning...   This question has been asked MANY times before over various forums, and there is a lot of excellent articles on how to do so. Try googling how to get into game development. Learn what you need before you start.   The process generally starts with an idea. When you have it - work on it. When you finished working on it, leave it for a couple of days. Try to not think about it at all. Then, come back to it and see if what you've written makes any sense. If it doesn't, try again. If it does, bombard it with as many questions as you can. Try break the idea. If it withstands all that, then only start actual development.   When it comes to developing, try to stick to a cycle. You can easily loose track of where you are going after you start if you don't have a clear goal. Remember to keep your code clean and ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS  comment your methods, inputs and outputs. IF anything goes large, you WILL need others to help you. If your code looks look something I wipe off my foot, then you might as well give up.   There is so much more I could say, but most of it will come through your own experience.   But asking for help isn't weakness. The more ideas and opinions you get from others - the better. Flaming will happen whether you like it or not. Please try to counter it with some pride and enthusiasm.
  9. Something about taking a toy initially made for some poor child who deserves it - and potentially killing someone with it - makes me smile a little.   I can even visualise myself charging in the front lines on a 3 year olds tricycle wielding a fuzzy hammer and an apron with the writing "I love you" embroided on.   Although, this idea doesn't seem much of an MMO - but rather an arena-based game (Maybe a minigame for the MMO?) I personally believe the more diverse a game is (in terms with personal powers, craftables etc), the better. Having a 'Santas workshop' definitely pleases me.   >> Slave Sana forced to create cute toys by the evil elves >> Sana and the other seasonal characters betting over who wins the arena   So many ideas. Whilst I really don't want to flame, all I can say is that this may have potential.
  10. The writing / history for this story can be found here: http://www.gamedev.net/topic/647160-newsretention-background-story-need-feedback/ Check out http://user.newsretention.co.za/ for updated on the site (if it is down or erroring out, pelase dont flame about it.)   NewsRetention as a whole is not a unique or original idea, but rather one that will take a concept and build on it in a way that will make people more eligible to play - and keep on playing it.   The idea behind it comes from some particularly well-known game titles of 'company hacking and defacing'. As the game goes, you will be a protagonist in a digital and real time world of red-door hacking. Companies and general members of the public will pay you to use your skills to help delete sensitive data, or even move it from one place to another. Most of the games generally get more interesting by allowing you to 'hack' other protagonists bank accounts, personal data vaults, etc to steal their identity and do devious things on their behalf. Or simply take their money.   Unfortunately, most of these titles are based on solo-play, with a very linear story.   NewsRetention aims to change that by bringing this concept to an online browser based game. The reason I feel this will work is because there isn't a need for a 3D engine or a downloadable client. Users can play this game from anywhere - at any time - on almost any platform. The data will always be real-time, users won't feel updates, and based on the technology used, servers won't be too expensive to run.      The three very apparent rolls in the game will consist of Companies, Users, and Protagonists. The Object (usually just confidential information) will be in the form of a User-Produced template. ('Templates' are not covered in this initial post) (A very brief overview of what templates are to be discussed)   Companies are entities that store templated in a hopefully secure vault. These entities are the only ones that can manage the outcome of a template. Note: Companies can create templates too. Users create templates. They then send the templates off to their preferred company to get processed. Protagonists are users who have the skillset to hack into companies, manipulate templates, and other dubious doings.   Templates are a vessel that contains data on anything the user desires. Companies then process the template and send it to the party at hand. Note: Templates were initially used to store information about each person.   The technology will consist of a server, and a Website front-end for users to play the game. The site will be coded in C# and JavaScript, with SignalR used as the real-time broadcaster. The Database will be MSSQL. I would like any feedback on this concept - whether you feel it may or may not work - or any constructive criticism you have on the idea. I've tried to accurately write out as much information as possible. However, it may not really make sense to you. I will update this post with any relevant news to help you decide.