ArrTaffer

Member
  • Content count

    5
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

326 Neutral

About ArrTaffer

  • Rank
    Newbie
  1. Use the scaling parameters of the drawImage method to and scale it by a negative amount on the axis you want: g2.drawImage(image, x, y, -width, height, null);
  2. Maybe I'm wrong here, but the anchor point you are using for your rotation is just width/2, height/2, you have to adjust for the x and y coordinates of the rectangle. If you modify your anchor point to: af.rotate(Math.toRadians(angle), (double) (x + width / 2.0),                 (double) (y + height / 2.0)); Let us know...
  3. Hi,   I'm far from being an expert, probably about the same level as you to be honest, but there is probably no real "correct approach". There may be approaches that fit what you are trying to do well, and approaches that may not fit it well.   You may want to think about XML as a way to store your level data, where you would store attributes about the room, some of which could be the exits/entrances, i.e.: <room ID="1">    <exits>       <exit Dir="North" ID="2" />       <exit Dir="East" ID="3" />    </exits> </room> So the "Dir" attribute would be the direction of the exit in the room, and the "ID" attribute would be the ID of the room that the exit leads to...   I did come across this article here, which sums it up more eloquently than I ever could: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dowens/archive/2007/04/16/loading-map-data-from-xml.aspx   So after that you would have to read the XML file and store it in some kind of linked list or array (probably better if it's tiled) of Room objects to then use, as not all rooms will have exits in each direction.   Hope this helps in some way!
  4. Hi,   I've been trying to develop something similar, but with elements of Tetris Attack, where the grid moves up slowly and you have to clear the blocks to stop them reaching the top, but including some of the popular elements of bejeweled etc, i.e. the special combo-blocks for 4-in-a-row and 5-in-a-row. Here are some of the main problems I've faced so far:   1) Creating a Grid object to hold all the blocks 2) How to check for combos? Check every single block each tick or only check those which have moved? We can suppose that a new combo will only happen if blocks move, but even if you parse every block that moves, the algorithm to check for combos is a tricky one (any advice from other people is welcome here) 3) I'm having a lot of problems with the falling blocks part, it seems that some of them occasionally disappear, but I'm too ashamed to post my awful code... :(    
  5. Do I need the CS degree to make it out there?

    Hi,   I created an account just to reply to this post (long time lurker etc etc).   Please don't drop out of your course. You've only done 1 year of it. I dropped out of my CS course during the 2nd year of it. The 1st year was easy, not very challenging at all. The 2nd year seemed to be when things got more complicated.   I was uninterested and spent more time to other things in life (i.e. partying) and got lazy with coursework and studying. Fast forward 10 years and I'm looking at interesting jobs that require CS degrees, and I know that almost certainly my resume is going to end up in the trash because I don't have a degree. Not only is it an unfortunate part of the recruitment process for most companies, but most employers want to know that you have the skills they require (i.e. things that have been covered in the course). The degree is good proof of that. Recently I got back into programming as a hobby (I too had been doing it from a young age) and was discovering all the things that I'd been too lazy to study up on in university. I wish I'd known all the content before doing the course, it would've made it all a lot easier, albeit uninteresting as you say. Surely knowing more of the coursework frees up more time to devote to other things (projects, work etc, not partying all the time)   In conclusion: the piece of paper they give you at the end is worth it. I seriously regret not devoting more time to studying and working on coursework. Now I'm reconsidering going back to college, but it's a lot harder to do that and hold down a full time job at the same time (as I'll have to pay for it somehow too). You seem to have all the requisite skills to do well in your course - you should use them, the piece of paper will serve you well.