MaxRC

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About MaxRC

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    Newbie

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    Production
    Programming
  1. Best Resource/Forum for GODOT?

    I would argue the Godot community is among the most supportive, vocal and active. I would suggest the official discord, the official page.and forums, and things like GDQuest's youtube and other discords like Game Dev League.
  2. C++ Game Engine Developers Wanted

    Still, some background about your team, people involved, previous experience, some projected roadmaps, etc. I can almost guarantee a detailed and thorough view of who you guys are and what you want to accomplish will reflect in the quality of the people that reach out.
  3. Realistic MMORPG

    How is the game engine a secret if you then state that is being programmed in UE4? Aside from that, this sounds like a very very large scoped project thought of by people not very experienced with actual game development. No offense meant, just advising that this is the farthest from a realistically achievable project as you could have gone Greetings
  4. Unity Openworld Gameengine

    Hello. We just did some small games for us. There we worked with all of the 3 engines. And no. We are 4 coder, 2.designer, 3 people who give a story and features, 3 people just for model making and 3 people for testimg and some other stuff. We have experiences with all 3 engines.   Well, if you guys have experience making games and have used all three engines, I would probably rank them in this order Unreal, Unity, Cryengine. I am going to throw the very same suggestion that has  been thrown a billion times before: don't start with an open world, focus on a captivating aesthetic, some particular mechanics you guys might have and make a far smaller scoped game from start to finish, something cool and playable but that actually allows you guys to finish it in a reasonable time frame. That will give you a proper product to build many things on: teamwork and an actual title if you guys want to take this into forming an actual game studio.    On a side note, seems like you have quite the large team :/, 3 people working on "giving story and features" sounds probably like too much for me, specially since that kinda sounds like a game designer and you already mentioned you got 2 of those; larger teams don't always mean faster progress :/.   But anyways, I would probably go with Unreal Engine, it has pretty much everything you guys might need, I have certainly seen many games going the open world route and choosing Unreal, and it will allow your whole team to be in on the development, regardless of their ability to code (others do this too, I just like UE better). Best of luck to you and your team :D
  5. Unity Openworld Gameengine

    Hi Alphaverse,   I guess the very first question should be: how much experience in game making do you and your team members have? Usually people set on an engine they have used before and they are comfortable with, since we are kind of past the point of "which one is the supreme one", have you guys done a full game before from start to finish?. Also, what does your team look like? I am assuming you don't have 15 coders, so what does the composition looks like and their individual experience making games?   Greetings
  6. Questions about creating a new game engine

    I don't mean to put anyone down here, and you are always going to be limited only by your own drive and motivation, but building an engine (even one for learning purposes) hardly seems like the right move for someone who would label themselves a newbie (I have no idea of your skills or experience, I am just going by the fact that you are asking in a For Beginners section). You mentioned you are using C++, I am going on a limb here and guess there is plenty of that language you don't know how to use, or more dark things from C you probably need to learn as well. Aside from that, it has been said before but C/C++ hardly are first languages for programmers (they were for me, but I really did not know any better), but I would suggest something along the lines of C# or Python, and if game development is your calling, move along simple games, but from start to finish, like Tic Tac Toe or Pong.   This advice has been given before a thousand times, but people seem to keep skipping it :(, trying to scope too much too fast will most likely end in frustration, and pushing you away from progress and what you really want to achieve. Build simple games, learn a simple library, practice C#, practice Python, practice collision detection, input, some minor graphics, simple AI, how it all glues up, read some stuff about architecture, practice some design patterns into your simple games, join a game jam, practice practice practice. Telling a beginner or someone along those lines to pursue their engine or saying a small engine can still be marketable really doesn't seem like the best move to me.    Remember game programming is programming, and programming is big part problem solving, and analytical thinking, just don't make the mistake of thinking along the lines of "I know doing this stuff on Unity so I'm good", no matter what new flashy tech comes along, fundamentals always have been and will be key, that means algorithms, data structures, complexities, math, etc.   I realize this has nothing to do with your initial question, but wanted to throw my 2 cents here on what I believe a next sensible move could be. Best of luck on your endeavors