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GFV

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  1. Hello!   I would like to create an app for iOS with a card game, that hasn't yet seen an app-release. It's something I really miss, because it's a card game I love. But what I was wondering was, who owns the rights for all those classic card games that we all know?     Thank you!
  2. Thanks, I’ve read it and it will definitely help us in the future I appreciate for sharing!
  3. Those are some very good questions Herbert Most of these are sadly still opened, we didn’t even start yet with the traffic.   I think one question you forgot is how many polygons car will have, currently that’s my biggest fear. I want the game to be beautiful too of course and details are important to us all   The thing about cars turning only right in Driver games — I don’t think that’s completely right. I think it was only this way in the latest Driver game, and yep I noticed it ;) Did I mind it? Not too much, but after some time, every time when you start the game, you know which car will be where, which does make it look very scripted (well, it IS scripted after all).   Also thanks for mentioning the highway loop idea. In fact we do have such a thing. Not a highway but it’s a big main street which makes a circle around the district the game is set it.     I’ll answer your questions because it also helps me visualise the whole thing for myself     As many as possible I hope! We also want to put lots of parked cars, something you don’t see in many games, and I feel it’s going to be problematic. I’d also like to make traffic jams if possible. (for example for certain modes, etc.)   Cars would suddenly disappear to make space for other cars?     Every lane would be one path, I’d also like to make extra paths for, say if you drive with a police car, so civilian cars make some space and jump onto the other path. This path would be a bit more right into right lanes and a bit more left into left lanes. But we have to see how exactly we would do this, or if someone else would do this, I have no idea about how it works right now to be honest. Maybe it’s possible to just set an off-set to the default lane path when a police car is behind the civilian car in question, in that case it wouldn’t need to make an extra path at all. Probably that’s how it works?   I don’t think so, it would be cool but probably too complex to make, and I would like to keep the game really simple.   Same as above I guess!   Yes of course!   It should brake of course, to not crash into oncoming traffic!   Well, that’s one problem I’ve been thinking of already for a while. There are several solutions. One would be that the traffic avoids the player, another one would be that traffic would stop behind the player and start to honk. The first solution is probably more complex to make, the second one poses another problem which I’ve experienced in early Driver games. Let’s say you stop at a red light, as if you were driving completely normally… the cars come and stop behind you, and suddenly start honking. Why? You aren’t doing anything wrong. So how exactly would you solve this problem? We’d have to make special “fields” near traffic lights in which civilian cars would enter and then if the light is red they wouldn’t honk, if it’s green they would. I don’t think this will work… Probably at the start we’ll just make them stop behind the player’s car without honking at all.   They’re going to have fixed paths?   Normal space which you should keep between two cars when driving at 50 km/h in real life, except at red lights (or if the player stops in front of the traffic), they should come closer in that case!   Good question. Is it possible to make them disappear and reappear very quickly? For example if the car is behind me. I see the car. I look back to the front. Car disappears. I look at the back, car reappears again. Is there such a system? Or would it take too long and the car wouldn’t show up in the first half second or so when I look back? I need to check how we can “spare” as many polygons on the screen (and in the whole scene) as possible, actually that’s someone else’s work but I still need to check this myself.     Do you have experience with making AI traffic? None of us does actually, it’s a complete new field. We’re far from doing the traffic system now but one day we’ll have to attack it I guess 
  4. Well, it isn’t exactly a racing game in the sense that you’re during pure races, it’s more open world driving around (with races too of course) but only in vehicles.   So the idea about fans and TV vans wouldn’t really work. Yes, there is AI traffic and the solution should be simple:   — If the roads are blocked, with any of the above mentioned methods, then the AI simply won’t go there. It will act as if there was no road at all there and it won’t turn into that corner — If we use the half-transparent barrier idea, with the 5 seconds limit, then the AI could drive there and eventually disappear after another corner   The player wouldn’t get to see that obviously because his car would be reset.   Like ShadowFlar3 said, 5 seconds is a lot at racing speeds, but I’d like to have plenty of traffic, therefore you won’t be able to drive that fast (I don’t want it to be a “Drive-300-km/h-in-the-city” sort of game), but obviously first we have to check if it’s possible at all to have the amount of traffic we wish, chances are it can’t be handled.   Then again, even if a player would cross the transparent wall at highest speed, it’s not too much of a problem for the extra map. The map is done by another company that we hired and it would only cost us a little more.   Also, we could apply both methods: blocked road plus transparent barrier. We could make it so the road blocks can be destroyed (concrete barriers, police cars, whatever) but as a result the player would heavily damage his car and eventually even flip. At the same time he would have crossed the transparent barrier, meaning he wouldn’t have come far because his flipped / crashed vehicle will be reset in 5 seconds.
  5. Wow some great lists here!   Thanks guys for all the ideas, definitely some useful and also funny stuff in there 
  6. Haha yes, our problem is that we have too many roads to block!   The collapsed bridges… we had this idea already because one part of the city is located next to a river. On the other side of the river starts a new district of the city which we do not want to cover because we only want to do one district, which is the city centre. We had the idea of collapsed bridges but finally some of us didn’t like the idea because a collapsed bridge kind of sends “negative vibes”, and this isn’t really a war game, it’s a racing game actually. So that’s how I got the idea of the construction site the first time, basically to make the bridge under construction. Ironically, this bridge was under construction for real (in the real city) not too long ago — leaving only space for trams. The trams in the game could block the road (they wouldn’t move from there in that case).   Finally I’m starting to wonder if it might not just be easier to place some “half-transparent” walls around city, and once you pass them, everything would turn black & white and you’d have 5 seconds or so to return, what do you think of this? Is this overdone? Does it have a bad image?
  7. Hello dear community!   (I hope this is the right forum)     So, we’re working on a game that uses a very detailed city map, it’s basically 1 to 1 with the real city. Of course it’s only a small district – but exactly like in reality.   The problem with this is that, to avoid people leaving this “zone”, we have to block some roads of some sort. Some games did it the simple way: putting a building at that place.   We don’t want that, because realism plays a big role here. We want to leave the city the way it is.   The problem: there’s around 30 roads to block…   Now we need some “arguments” why these roads are closed. An example: there’s a construction site in this road, and therefore it’s blocked. We could place concrete barriers like these at this place:     Of course also with everything else that goes with a construction site, behind the barriers.   I also often noticed walls blocking the view on a construction site, a bit like this one here:     I’m unsure what these are called, but that would be a solution too.     I’ve thought about road accidents as well. Maybe concrete barriers again, this time with police and rescue vehicles behind and some wrecked cars. Now that I’m thinking of it… the same concept with some fire trucks behind could be a solution too, not with fire in real-time, but maybe with black buildings hinting something was on fire here.   For the idea with the accident: perhaps even a long truck (a petrol tanker for example) flipped, which takes the whole length of the road, could do the job as well.   I’ve basically tried to take ideas from other games. I’d have more ideas, like this one: the road blocked again, eventually also with police vehicles, and people demonstrating at the back. Basically hinting that this road is blocked because of a demonstration. I’m not sure how hard it would be to do this, but I don’t think anyone of us knows how to. Well, it doesn’t matter, we can always hire someone, so it’s not completely off the list.     So my question is: does anyone have more suggestions?   Thanks!
  8. Very interesting, thank you!
  9. Oops, 3D :)   But the 2D one you posted looks really really nice! Very tempting!   Too bad, seems like there aren’t any, I was hoping there would be something like the Beam NG thing but for boats…
  10. Hello!   Does any of you know of a physics engine for boats? I can’t seem to find any. Basically we’re looking for something already-done which we can use for our game, just like there’s also the same thing for cars, etc…   If you know of any, please let me know!   Thanks 
  11.   It matters that instead of using one set of IP (e.g. Ford Interceptor) are using two sets of IP (e.g. Ford Interceptor and police trademarks).   So yes, it matters because you will face even more lawsuits if you violate it, or more licensing fees if you properly license it.   Thanks, that's what I thought.       An article (or two) that may be of interest to you   Chrysler LLC's Dodge, which has category-exclusive sponsorship of the "Defiance" TV show and online game for PC, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360   The use of Porsche and Ferrari in games and recent shenanigans of the licence holders   Fictional Car brands     These next articles, whilst not directly pertaining to cars does pertain to issues of first amendment rights Vs the usage of trademarked products in games...this area is however a relatively recent development and the legalities are by no means resolved as of yet.   EA Invokes First Amendment Protection for Video Games in Trademark Dispute with Helicopter Maker EA refuses to licence guns and war paraphernalia in its action games this year   How this would apply outside of the US legal system is also an unresolved issue.     on a completely trivial note:       Does this count as a reason???????????     Cheers, I'll read this when I find the time!       Yeah, obviously we don't want something like that! I don't think anyone does. But it's cool to hear they actually approached you, it means a lot I guess!
  12. Alright, thanks.   If we want to use some vehicles for a special use, does this matter? Let's say one of the cars could be used as a police car,  I believe this is something that should be mentioned, right?
  13. Hello guys!     I know the answer is: more we can afford. But I still have some questions. We would really like to use real licensed vehicles in our game, we have a whole range of highly-detailed models at our disposition, and we would like to add a damage model too. Obviously, this all makes it not only very complicated, but probably extremely expensive too.     But recently, I've stumbled across this article. I found some interesting things in there, which I will quote here:       I quoted this, because our project kind of fulfils all of these "requirements". We are still at the very first stage of our "game", basically we are discussing things and getting informed about various stuff, to see if it's even possible to accomplish this whole thing. We have talked to the guys of BeamNG, and that is the physics engine we would like to use.   We believe that it is the most realistic it can get at this point, as far as damage and maybe driving physics go.   If we have a Ford Focus in our game, it certainly wouldn't hit 500 mph, we also don't flip cars for no reason, the cars don't catch fire either, and you can not run over pedestrians. There's no animals.     The thing is, we are not a big studio. In fact, we're a very small one. I was wondering, is it possible that for us, the licenses for these vehicles would be cheaper than for a big studio? Is there a way of getting them cheaper? I know for a fact that some studios, like Polyphony Digital, don't pay anything for the licenses at all, but obviously we aren't making Gran Turismo here, and our game is unknown and has no reputation therefore, which means there's no interest at the moment for the brands to have their vehicles in our game, unless it becomes a huge hit one day, which, however, is not really our main goal.     What could be some tricks on how we could approach this whole situation? We're really trying to do a very realistic game, like I mentioned earlier, we are planning on using the BeamNG physics, and we also have a 100% accurate, 1:1 3D map of a whole district of the city we will be using. (this 3D map was originally made for architects, to measure sound and sunlight, and such things I believe)   My idea was to finish this part of the city, to wait for the BeamNG physics to be ready, so we can use them, and basically make a small demo to showcase what it would look like. We have a whole range of highly-detailed vehicles at our disposition, that are being designed by an excellent 3D studio, like I said earlier. This should really give an idea of what the whole thing will look like. I'm convinced it will look and play really good, and I was hoping that if we get this ready, it could have a big influence,on how the brands will react on this whole thing, on the price that we will eventually have to pay to get the licenses, and if we're actually allowed to use them at all. But we still remain a small group of people, which (therefore) kind of hints the manufacturers that we can't pay them hundreds of thousands of Euros, or maybe even millions, for licenses. (I really have absolutely no idea how much such a license costs)     All help is greatly appreciated!
  14. Thanks guys, I appreciate your help.
  15. Yeah, it's not just the city mentioned, it's a whole part of the city accurately detailed. I'll guess I'll have to contact them then.