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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

NewVoxel

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  1. While small it appears that the tournament funding for the SC2 scene has been diminishing slowly since 2012 before the expansion was even released while it is also being "out-popularized" by MOBA games in which the funding has increased exponentially. http://www.esportsearnings.com/history/2014/games   Although an incomplete list this article shows that the quantity of quality titles coming out has diminished over recent years. Granted it takes more money and time to create AAA titles now so that must still be taken into consideration I suppose. As for the actual number of players playing these games it's entirely my speculation that they're decreasing. I don't see much hype or discussion about the genre (even though someone just recently started a hype thread about C&C on this board!)   I still believe over time investors will continue getting less confident with the genre opting instead to continue producing FPS titles and MOBA games in the already over saturated market.
  2. Call me a skeptic if you must, but I think most would agree that there are fewer players enjoying RTS games and as a result fewer games being developed for the genre.   Currently the last champions of RTS have been reduced to a few significant names, Starcraft 2 that has seen a decline with its e-sports centric audience (most likely mobbing towards the ever popular MOBA genre) and Command & Conquer which had its last official released game panned by Critics and abandoned by fans(Company of Heroes 2 is the other other recent RTS example). The attempt to make a Free to Play C&C apparently failed as well, it’s pretty damning to see the two biggest names in a once popular genre fail to keep a foot hold as they once had.   In a competitive environment they can be quite difficult to play, and quite stressful at times due to how unforgiving they are. More so than team games. This can scare a lot of people away in the long term. The thing to keep in mind is that because there is no reliance on a team, all losses and any mistakes are 100% the fault of the player. This leads to a lot of bruised egos. Also because of this difficulty, it is very difficult to play 1v1 in a casual way, especially right now. Most of the lowest level players have dropped out so anyone just starting is going to be facing some fairly tough competition compared to if they started even a year back.   Most of the people I know who switched from SC2 to DOTA/League did so because they like the team atmosphere and find it less stressful to play.   For non-competitive RTS, it seems like many of the developers have been stuck in a bit of a rut. The Creative Assembly games have been all kinda bland for the last couple, and CnC is basically dead. AoE Online was a bit of a bust so whether or not we will see something new from that series I don't know.   I'm a huge fan for innovation in the genre such as the RPG elements introduced in Warcraft 3 or the focus on capturing bases/checkpoints in Dawn of War / Z and wish to see more of this as I believe it's one of the things to draw players back into the scene. That and perhaps innovating the multiplayer experience to more social for the more casual market that's available.  
  3. You will more than likely die of bordem if you try making your own engine instead of using any of the ones we have available. It consumes too much time and doesn't really help you make better games which is the fun part.
  4. Drop Dudes has been released! Check it out here: http://t.co/KlpD9v4vdD #DropDudes #gamedev #indiedev
  5. Finally getting rid of the programmer graphics and adding some sprites! #DropDudes #gamedev http://t.co/bM5rQGkSGq
  6. New game "Drop Dudes" is coming along nicely. Follow closely for the anticipated release! #DropDudes http://t.co/jol31ylIHf
  7. If you're dead set on learning Java from a book I'd recommend Head First Java   It will be a long time before you're making any RTS games though if you've never programmed before.
  8. FAQ
  9. Well I've never used Unity so I won't be able to hand out any personal recommendations. However, I don't think you're going to get your deep understanding of the program through the use of tutorials. The whole idea behind them is to demonstrate how small individual tasks can be tackled; it's then up to the reader to piece this information together and create something from all the individual tutorials.   On that note I would suggest you find any tutorial that outlines the broad scope of how an RTS/RPG game is designed. From there try and create one on your own with your own unique features. When you're absolutely stumped on how to do something specific like path finding then you can search for a tutorial on the matter and figure out how to put their code into your game. This way you're forced to alter their existing code and enforce your understanding of the subject.   If you get stuck in the tutorials and require even more information it's normally a good idea to just read through the game engines documentation. This is as bountiful as the information is going to get and you'll uncover a whole new world of functionality that you weren't going to find in any tutorials. Just monkeying around with random functions that come with the game engine will teach you most of what you need to know in due time of course.
  10. This will solve all your queries   In all seriousness just follow any of the tutorials you can find in your favorite search engine. I'm sure anything that shows on the top of your search results will be more than enough to get you started.
  11. That made me laugh way more than it should have.
  12. I've scanned through it a dozen times, but can't seem to find much. It's probably nothing but I did notice an inconsistency with with your GetBlockType if (mPieces->GetBlockType (pPiece, pRotation, j2, i2) != 0) that you seem to be passing in your Y value j2 before your X value i2. Is it meant to be like this or have you accidentally switched the order in which you pass them into the function? Just strange that everything else addresses the x values first.
  13. So you're mainly just lost on what should be in your game? I don't think there's really a go-to template for how to design your game since all games are unique. What you're doing now though looks like it has great potential to be expanded upon though.   Add a dozen level platforms to your level select screen that can only be unlocked on the completion of previous levels. Above each level display the current high score for said level Add more challenges to the levels eg (Race against the clock, Reversed controls) Reward the player with new skins/themes/soundtracks for collecting all the coins Add checkpoints to particularly long levels You get the idea. I think it's important to define a set of features your game will include before development and stick to it. Don't add too much and get overwhelmed, but add enough to make it a complete game. Just look at other games for examples of what commercial games include such as a settings screen and other non game-play related features   Unfortunately there's no way around using the game assets you create unless you're willing to pay others to create them for you, or compromise with open source music and graphics. I'd recommend giving it all a lash yourself though. You may pick up some useful skills if you learn how to create your own sound effects and graphics. Doesn't matter if they're terrible as you'll get better and you can always replace them later with ease if they're not up to standards.   Don't expect reputable proper reviews from anywhere unless you're willing to pay a couple of bucks for some critiques website to rate your game. Most places you ask for a review on aren't going to give you reviews that are any more in depth to that which you might see on the Apple/Android app stores.   The biggest and most important critique for your game is you! What do you want to see in your game? What do you think would make it better?
  14. You'll need to be a bit more specific in what you're asking. Try rephrasing your questions to tackle individual problems.   Game looks like it's progressing alright. I like the groovy background music.
  15. I’m a typeface geek, and when it comes to selecting a font I’ll stare at all day, I tend to be pretty picky. Recently, when I discovered that a friend was using a sub par typeface (too horrible to name here) for his Terminal and coding windows, my jaw dropped, my heart sank a little, and I died a bit inside.   Color schemes are another thing users should be weary of. It's debatable that dark fonts on light backgrounds provide a better reading experience, but I'm a fan of the darker themes so my eyes don't start bleeding after staring at the monitor for several continuous hours.   So what setup are you currently rockin'? Post 'em now!