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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

HeroBiX

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  1. Thanks Tom for filling in =) Unity have a free version and on there website you have a lot of information already and I'm sure if you goolge Unity vs Unreal, you will find people ocmparing the two
  2.   The Blue Code is a 2D Point & Click adventure game where you play as Lisa who have just lost her husband Archeblad and now you have to drag around with Glitch who appeard from nowhere.   This is in a land ruled by the Mad King who was jelous of Lisa and Archebald, since he has been alone for such a long time, he went to the wizard to tell him to fix Archeblad once and for all, but something went wrong... or did it? Will Lisa fall in love with the Mad King? or will Lisa find Archebald and restore their love? and who the *piip* is Glitch?   The Blue Code is my final project I did during my time at Vancouver FIlm Schools course, Entertainment Business Management and this is the first video game this course have ever produced. The course itself is to prepare you as a producer, event manager, project manager for the entertainment industry. This game is developed within a time frame of 3 months and we are looking to tweek some things and for summer 2014, we will launch a kickstarter and we will take the game from there. The game is avaliable here: http://goo.gl/5jT5ov   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bluecodegame Please like us =) and play the game and provide us with feedback, we want to make this game AWESOME! =)
  3. I think the best way for you to go is to make games, find people on forums to get together to make a game. You have knowledge in both android and unity, come up with an idea or find an artist that have an idea, get together and do something, might be shit, but remember the experience from it, all experience you gain is worth something, even if it's shit experience, take what you learned from it and tell them at the job interview what you did and what you learned from it.   Even do your own projects in your free time, set goal when you are going to be done with the game, very imporant and tell a friend that he/she should bug you with questions about the game and what is happening and not letting you off the hook. Here is something I wrote as an answer on another post: Something that they tought me at school which is many people have told me is a great way, both in interviews and on resume & coverletters, calling STAR S - Situation, what situation where you in? What was the problem/oppertunity? (10%) T - Task, what is your task, where you working as project manager? lead developer? (10%) A - Action, what did you do to solve the problem or making use of the oppertunity (40%) R - Result, how did it turn out? (40%) The procent, meaning what the employer is looking for, the most important is what you did do and what the result is, talk alot about this and make it broad. example: S - Situation: Working with a 3D game in unity where there was very long loading times everywhere in the game, I realise that the game testers didn't like waiting this long for the game to load and got fustrated and we had problem in the team to find the time to fix this problem. T - Task: I was working as a AI programmer A - Action: I took a few long nights to dig into the code to figure out what the problem was, I saw that the game re-rendered most of the objects and saw flaws in the AI coding that made some heavy prestandad loops that was not nessecery R - Result: The game was loading 75% faster and the games was starting to run in 60FPS and not 20FPS, the game testers started to love our game, we got an award for best optimized game at school I'm not a programmer and some of this might not br accurate, I hope you still will get the point I'm trying to get across This is very usefull to use when they say: this is a very competitive market and you don't have experience, tell them that you are vell aware of it and that you got this knowledge and experience from your project and schools, tell them that you might not have industry experience, but you know what you are doing, it all about how you sell yourself in this industry =)   and you are TA at a school? talk to them? that a school FULL of people with talent and people who wants to get experience and try different things, I'm sure you can find a sound person and a artist to get together and make something cool together =) so... go out and make more GAMES! god damn it! stop reading... make stuff! =)
  4. Can you please upload new Mac version, the link dosn't work, only gets me to Onslaughts main site and please edit your first post with some imagire from the game =)
  5. Looks like a really nice game =) is it avaliable to try playing it? something that I saw was that when throwing knife at the guard, he didn't have any indication that you hit him with a knife, you might have already fixed that, other than that, I want to try it =)
  6. No Mac? oO just kidding, looks like a great puzzle game, thinking about also making a web browser release? easy to spread to people and can be played on all platforms?
  7. Regarding your resume and webiste, why don't you have this there:     This is work experience is it's valid, put it on your resume and start working on your own project to show up more projects, when looking at your portfolio, it's not a lot, do you have some small games that you made that you could put up on your site? have you tried some specific programing type? example event, or something with ligh changes depending on what the player does and so on. Look at this regarding making your resume a notch better: https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1440&bih=729&q=beuatiful+resume&oq=beuatiful+resume&gs_l=img.3...587.3848.0.3944.17.14.0.3.0.0.159.806.13j1.14.0....0...1ac.1.32.img..4.13.776.C6EXcwv9ctc   and applying to 10 jobs, you can do that within one day, thats applying to one job each hour. If you know a cool game company that you want to work with, get to know them, contact someone from the company, ask them to buy that person a coffee, but! a big BUT! remember, this is an informaitonal meeting, not a job interview, DON'T ask if you can start working their, they will ask you if they like you. Something that they tought me at school which is many people have told me is a great way, both in interviews and on resume & coverletters, calling STAR S - Situation, what situation where you in? What was the problem/oppertunity? (10%) T - Task, what is your task, where you working as project manager? lead developer? (10%) A - Action, what did you do to solve the problem or making use of the oppertunity (40%) R - Result, how did it turn out? (40%) The procent, meaning what the employer is looking for, the most important is what you did do and what the result is, talk alot about this and make it broad. example: S - Situation: Working with a 3D game in unity where there was very long loading times everywhere in the game, I realise that the game testers didn't like waiting this long for the game to load and got fustrated and we had problem in the team to find the time to fix this problem. T - Task: I was working as a AI programmer A - Action: I took a few long nights to dig into the code to figure out what the problem was, I saw that the game re-rendered most of the objects and saw flaws in the AI coding that made some heavy prestandad loops that was not nessecery R - Result: The game was loading 75% faster and the games was starting to run in 60FPS and not 20FPS, the game testers started to love our game, we got an award for best optimized game at school I'm not a programmer and some of this might not br accurate, I hope you still will get the point I'm trying to get across, hope it helps =)  
  8. Do you have a game design document? Do you have the main team? ex a programmer, designer, writter and if you can, a sound guy?   It feels that you don't really know what excaly you want to do, I love that you have a budget and right now it feels that your scope is really huge and for Odin sake, don't stop, start by get your core team together, should be people you know or got good referal from, this is the people who will help you make the game from start to finish. With your core team, make a Game Design Document, wiki has a good outline to start with: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_design_document This is for development and why so few people? becuase it's cheap to do with a few people to get the core game, figure out what you need to make your game, what the game is about? what mechanics and events will be included? whats our Wish, want and need list? Have you looked into using Unity? This is form me a indy production and Unity has a bigger support for indie and also a bigger support for it as well, both regarding community and addons for the program. Hope it helps =)
  9. Thank you very much for a fast answer and good information! I will start digging into it =)
  10. You can get the money in a lot of ways   Crowed sourcing, like Kickstarter: - if you are not well known, you need to be able to show case that you can do it, proof of concept, not talking pretty pictures, in game footage that you are in the game. Check this link out for help for making a kickstarter: http://99u.com/articles/7143/kicking-ass-taking-donations-9-tips-on-funding-your-kickstarter-project With kickstarter, be prepared to put A LOT of time into it. People I talked to who made a kickstarter tell me it's a full time job for one person, at least. And research other successful kickstarter and see what they have done.   Investors: - Angel investors, people who has a lot of money and want to invest, taking a bigger risk, but want more in return. They usually range between $50-100,000 as investment and they want around 130-150% back on their deal, a few years later of course. You could be able to find a angel investor who wants to be your mentor as well, helping you out with your idea.   - Investors: Other investors will probably take your company and your IP, better watch out what the contract says.   - Bank loan - If you have a good credit, you can take a loan without security and get the game started, sure, not as nice as investors who you could convince that you need a few more months to pay back, Banks, not going to be easy.   - Funding - In Canada and in Sweden, there is different government and companies who gives out funding, some is "free" money, you don't need to pay it back, but you need to prove that the money is going to the project. Some is they lend you the money and they ask for the money back and a bit more in return, usually around 5-15%, if I remember correctly - Family and friend, if you really believe in it, ask your friends and family for it, they love you (I hope) and they usually support you for your first project, goes well in hand with crowed sourcing.   - As Spacejim said, you can take a part time job, you can do a programmer job, as long as it says in the contract that you can keep your IP and also work on other projects. Start making connections with other people around the industry to have them help you out, convince them that it will make profit and they will get a share. I'm thinking that you are a programmer, usually programmer don't have a strong sense of art, if you are great at art, AWESOME! Keep at it!   Think that pretty much covers everything, if you want to know more about something, please feel free to contact me =)
  11. Hello =) I'm putting together a investor package for my game, The Blue code, you can see more about it here: [url=www.facebook.com/bluebtree]Facebook[/url] even play a really early version here: [url=studioryu.net/dev/TheBlueCode]Click Here[/url] and to be able to convince people that this is a good idea, I need numbers to back the whole thing up, example, sales numbers for Point & Click adventure games, not going back more then five years. Or revenue for companies and games, same thing here, not going back more then five years Where can I find this information, tried google around, but nothing good showed up Thanks
  12. Not often I hear paying per objective, but seems like a good way of doing it. I would say that for the total project they reccive $1000 (actually $1200, $200 is hold off as a "bonus"), reccive $250 start, put $250 after first milestone, $250 second and on delivery on time, recciving $550