ngbeslhang

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About ngbeslhang

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  1. Can you explain to me this code !

    To other people: Since he is an ESL (incase if you don't know, English as Second Language) (so do I), I think we should explain to him in a simpler English or even chat to him in his native language. To OP: What language do you talk to your family? (I know this is off-topic, just remind you guys about this) EDITEED TO ADD TL;DR: KEEP IN MIND THAT THE OP IS AN ESL, EXPLAIN TO HIM WITH SIMPLER VOCALS.A
  2. Should I stick with programming or game engine?

    Do you have a mathematical prove that this method is good for random number generation? You'll obviously get some unexpected values, but that doesn't mean they're random (or "work" as random). If you're not worried about that do it as you want, but it's always better to use more standard methods for this kind of things. Random numbers are a hard thing to do in a computer, maybe you already know, but the best thing you can get are actually pseudorandom numbers, the same seed will produce the same sequence. Anyway, you said that you'll create the integer "number" and randomize it, so you mean that "number" is just the seed? If so, you're just creating a seed with a complex procedure and making it shorter at the same time (6 digits + 6 digits = 7 digits at most, when current time expressed in UNIX format can have up to 10 digits i think). EDIT: Sorry, you'll also randomize time and date, so you can have larger seeds, but it still looks like a waste ot time, you'll get a seed that's equaly as usefull as using just the current time. No. I'll go to that chapter and relearn. I agree with you that using current time as seed is useful enough. I think I'll use the date+time method for encoder thing.
  3. Did I begin learning late?

    That should not be your goal - if you set your goal, instead, to be "good" when you evaluate yourself, and not by comparing yourself to others, you will, at that point, be better than him. And, at that same moment, being better than him will no longer matter. If you want to be judged according to someone else's standards - get married.Goddamnit I accidentaly downvoted your post on my phone. Anyway, I agree with you. OP, you should not become competitive on programming actually.
  4. Did I begin learning late?

    It doesn't matter what age are you in, I am 14 turning 15. You should ignore any insults from that *****.
  5. Should I stick with programming or game engine?

    So do I. I am confused when you said that to me actually. 1. So did you mean I should completely avoid them or? 2. Since I knew some basics of C++ (not OPP though) I think it's perhaps not a major problem. 3. I knew it already, will remove question 2 later. 1. I think that he meant to say you shouldnt skip them because they are heavily used in game programming. So, go back and watch them because you will be wanting to use them. 2. Specifically for a language as complicated as C++ is, just knowing some basics of C++ isn't really good enough to pass off having a satisfactory understanding. It may be boring but if you don't know exactly what you're doing then you're probably going to be writing ugly, inefficient code and most likely copy-pasting a lot of code that other people use but you don't really understand, which is never a good thing. So make sure you really have a solid understanding of C++ before you start into a serious project. It's fine to just mess around with creating simple games like a tic-tac-toe or pong clone as a way to help learn the language, but if you go into a large project without a really good understanding then you're setting yourself up for failure. I learned that the hard way. I do agree with both. But for random number generator I do have my own idea. First, declare two integer called date and time which stores current date or time then randomize both of them. (Date will be in format DDMMYY, time will be in format HHMMSS.) Last, declare the integer called number which contains the sum of integers date and time and randomize it. Anyway, I'll listen to you guys. I know.
  6. Should I stick with programming or game engine?

    Since my first game will be isometric-based (2.5D?) I am not certain if most of the 2D game engines will support such view.
  7. Should I stick with programming or game engine?

    1. So did you mean I should completely avoid them or? 2. Since I knew some basics of C++ (not OPP though) I think it's perhaps not a major problem. 3. I knew it already, will remove question 2 later.
  8. Should I stick with programming or game engine?

    1. What I mean is which one should I start? 2. Okay.
  9. I am relearning C++ through learncpp.com (quite good to me) and I'm at the link (http://www.learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/612-references-vs-pointers-and-member-selection/) right now, skipped 5.9 and 6.4 though, since it's confusing. I decided to start with rogue-like Kairosoft-based game development company (a.k.a Game Dev Story) PC game (yes, I'm serious). Will include: * Employees will have their own traits and pressue level * Have various power systems to choose from * Include disasters, employee disobey the law and got caught etc. * And more... But, I feel that game engine are more simple than programmimg from scratch, since my maths is just average. Also, I think that game engines will limit anything I can add. Thanks.
  10. c++ basics

    It's not really a good idea to tell a beginner to use a line of code that it's generally considered bad practice to use. I think I'll thank to my first C++ book (from Sams, I later found out their books are considered bad) for not telling me to add that statement.
  11. Need advice please with game making

    Wow... same age as me, even both of us were learning the same programming language... Anyway, Unity does support users using C++, but ONLY FOR UNITY PRO USERS.
  12. c++ basics

    This actually depends on you. E.g. I used to be starting to learn Java via books, but found it quite hard. Thus C++ actually seems easy to me. (It does.) I decided to relearn C++ online (no, I only learnt like 2/3 from the book, especially the for loop kept confused me :/) so I introduce you learncpp.com. (I know, didn't updated for yeaes, but at least most of them are useful)
  13. Language Choice

    1. Especially the price gives you a full license, including have the access to the engine's full source code. Also I forgot to mention that if your games were using the engine you'll need to give them 5% of your royalities, which is quite good. 2. I guess it has been a few years ago? 3. Agreed. Sorry for the late reply, of course you know we were from different timezones. (My signature says all) EDIT FOR THE OP: Well, I also forgot to tell you that UE4 (if you don't know what's this means, it's Unreal Engine 4) have a new feature called Blueprint, which is a visual scripting system. Which means you can create the entire game without even needing to know how to code AT ALL! Tappy Chicken (of course it's based on Flappy Bird), which is available on iOS, Android and HTML for free, was an example created with UE4 by one of Epic Games' artists (one person) who did not even have experience on programming with Blueprint in a weekend (one day?). I should mention that I did not own an UE4 license at all. I tried the example and it's not quite bad.
  14. Language Choice

    Well, I should mention that now both Unreal Engine 4 and CryENGINE are cheaper than most commercial game engines (Better than Unity Pro's 30,000 dollars), which are 19$ and 9.90$ per month each. (CryENGINE was available on Steam last month, but according to the Steam reviews and CryDev, most people suscribed to the service were dissapointed to such things due to it's just a free SDK with an added feature) EDIT: So after checking the official site, there were two kind of licenses available to the CryENGINE. The one which is on Steam was just a suscription. The other one was a full license, which you need to contact CryTek for it.
  15. Did you check the Unreal Engine 4?