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Zambz

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  1. Hey guys,   First some background on my game:   3d fantasy survival horror game Complete openworld sandbox game (only transitions are from external to internal locations)   The game is not about looting or getting best gear even though crafting and gathering is a main game mechanic, its about atmosphere and story/lore from my own hand written story world that i have been creating for a while now.   The game emphasises exploration, i dont want the player going from a to b in a straight line and sometimes c, mystery is key.   Initially i was going full multiplayer 8+ players but creating anytype of openworld quest structure in a randomised terrain would have been insanely resource intensive on a team ?   My question is how would you like to play a survival horror game set in an open world, option 2 is do able with some creative editing without the worry of getting random generation correct, instead you can take your time precisely crafting it, not worry about too many quests also gives time for perfecting the core mechanics too.   I guess i spent most of my time writing my story world that i feel i have to put the whole thing in the game lol, im just so proud of it ?     One of the main game mechanics: The world is darkness and within this darkness things live, the only way to survive is find light, if the light goes out prepare to fight (if your holding a torch it takes up one hand, so your damage/defence is lowered (beware bandits and other wildlife), though if you drop the torch and pick up your bow/shield/offhand the darkness will come, what do you choose?       OPTION 1   Random terrain generation w/ hand created structures, quests and story No story Full multiplayer 8+ Little to no npc's, no encounters???   This option seems pure survival, as it would offer no quests or bigger story to follow, its you and others vs the darkness.   OPTION 2   Hand created terrain w/ hand created structures, quests and story Simple to no story Full multiplayer 4 to 8 Little to no npc's and no encounters   Pretty much same as 1 but offers a more in-depth world to explore with more detailed atmosphere.   OPTION 3   Hand created terrain w/ hand created structures, quests and story Simple to advanced story Coop 2 players Lots of npc's and encounters     This option would see the world really come alive and offer alot more story, full quests and atmosphere(with only 2 ppl giving the personal touch while keeping things straight forward )   OPTION 4   Hand created terrain w/ hand created structures, story and quests Full story Single player only (but could be coop) Full npc's, random encounters, borders and factions   This is the full story world, the ultimate living world, think skyrim world but 100x more dangerous (more content, more encounters and really opening up the world to be explored and scared ?)       Last question, do you think 8 players would be too many for this type of game? The lower the players the more easier it is to implement more.   Any ideas or feedback is welcomed ?
  2. Wow those are some awesome ideas guys, im not going to be taking random as literally  the content will be hand made (quests/buildings/random enounters) they will just be randomly seeded/placed in the world so they are not always in the same place and some maps wont have all the content etc (which means a few playthroughs to see all content)   Theres a big part of this game im keeping quite about so some of my ideas may not come across to well so i apologise   @haegarr i see what you are trying to get at and its, i do like option b and it seems alot more viable option to go for, think i have to map out some dynamics and options to help make sure.   @meatsack im loving you ideas and examples, especially the endgame plots thats really cool, though i say random, i only mean along the lines of terrain, mobs and locations but the content like buildings/mines/castles/cities will be handmade as to keep the lore, quests and style in check. (think of it as a bag of content, when someone makes a new game, terrain gets generated, borders set, and then random content from the bag will get placed in a random place but still adhering to their border designations, that make sense? and every new game will be randomised...   So the "lich king" castle would be custom built but in different locations of every new game.
  3. Lets take the 2.5 isometric mechanics/view of diablo type games mix in the randomly generated worlds and freedom/exploration of minecraft and then add randomly placed content (mobs/quests/buildings/mines/cities - all of which are handmade to give lore and story), do you think this would work?   The world i can create, that's the easy part, the harder part is trying to figure out how to implement the quests, sure you can put in random encounters like diablo 3, but they sucked and added nothing to the experience.   Guess the quest system really depends on:   A. Do i go diablo route and have the world generate every onload (which can get quite confusing if you quit midquest, and multi location quests would be hell of a pain in the ass to get right)    B. Have a map which is randomly generated once and seed the map with random content once and use other mechanics (mobs/mines/buildings etc.) every load to add feeling of the world changing.   I'm trying to give the game a feeling of mystery, every corner there's something new, trying for big replayability in a way like minecraft/terraria/world of craft/cubeworld without the destructibility and building theme park.   Oh its going to be multiplayer too   On another note how hard to you think it would be to set country borders in a randomly generated map and have specific mobs only spawn in them?
  4. Thanks for he replies guys, so I've decided to go the random generation route when it comes to the world and to insert random quests and encounters (custom built quests and encounters but randomly placed and you never truly know which ones you will come across and where) I will use these to tell the story and flesh out the world, as its a multiplayer game I will also put group quests for added difficulty.   But I shall do what technogoth said and that's actually focus on the world first and the randomness and procedural generation, then focus on fleshing out and telling the story of the world and after that figure out if the game needs an ending/main story.   Just from me posting this thread has answered alot of my own questions and given my good ideas on how to proceed
  5.   Yeah I know what you mean about over ambition and I guess in this stage of my design I'm trying to figure out how to keep it small while still being playable so some points i have to think big to figure out how to pull things back, that make sense?
  6. What do you guys think? Theres so many set during middle ages with knights and swords etc then you have the opposite being sci fi far into the future but are they really that unique in their timeframes?   You also  have the historical ones that slightly change the setting and realism (assassins creed) but I really want to know what games you think are the most creative and unique in terms of combining the time period and setting.
  7. So I am currently designing an open world sandbox game which puts big emphasis on exploration and freedom and need for crafting and combat.   I have a basic backstory on the world and how it came to be, I also have ideas for mobs and npc's (Random encounters, outposts etc)   What I'm having trouble figure out is should I have a major quest line and an ending to the game and would that take away from the freedom of exploration, crafting and having to gather materials?   Its a 2.5d isometric game like diablo3 mixed with the world of skyrim and freedom of minecraft and will be multiplayer but at the same time I don't want to copy them.   Part of the back story is that due to an incident the population fled underground and now hundreds of years later the players character gets abducted (subject to change) and taken above ground where the world has completely changed, but you quickly realise that you are not the only one above ground, new colonies/villages spring up, bandits scour the land and the unknown also inhabit the darkness. Its now up to the player to figure out just what's going on trying to survive and.....   Now if I were to put in quests the story would see the player trying to put right the incident that happened and banishing the unknown enemy, I really would like replayability. going from an example of Diablo 3 they created replayability from difficulty and encounters (even though they were pretty rubbish) minecraft is purely endless but has the ender dragon and skyrim though its purely quest based does well for exploration but is only single player (spent hours exploring that world without doing main quest)   I have so many ideas, its hard pin pointing down what will and won't work really and one more note, I'm trying to create an open world that can evolve with future updates where friends can enjoy the secret combat mechanic I've come up with (so proud of it ) random generation has also been on my mind which makes it an even tougher idea on quests and story line but if I can get random encounters/quests, random villages/outposts, random mobs and a night/day cycle it could make it pretty epic.   Oh and this game is fantasy but takes its timeframe from the 1700's so think highwaymen, pirates, assassins and gunpowder (though muskets are rare site still)     I know I've rambled on a bit, but would be nice to others input on these ideas any would help, thanks