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jamiesalisbury

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  1. Quite right, "conversation starter" was the wrong phrase! I've read "How to Win Friends and Influence People" so I should know better ;-) FAQ 54 is excellent thanks. No chest hair or neck ties!
  2. Hi all, resurrecting this old thread with some more questions and some news! I'm almost certainly going to attend GDC in March. If anyone can answer any of the following questions I'd be grateful: 1. How many days should I allow to be there to take best advantage? I can't imagine wandering around an exhibition for more than 2 days at the most to be honest. 2. Will standard EXPO pass tickets be sufficient for my needs, i.e networking? I'm sure the audio lectures are great, but it's a lot extra and finances are currently tight. 3. Are there any events that I should be aware of while choosing my dates?  4. Any recommended hotels? Again - budget is reasonably tight. News is I've just completed a soundtrack for a tablet game for a big name developer. I'm hoping it will be out by GDC time. So that'll be a good conversation starter at least!  
  3. Hi Alex, I explained earlier in the thread - I love playing games, I've just avoided them for 10 years because if anything I enjoyed them too much and played for too long. Needed to concentrate on composing at the time, didnt occur to me I could combine the two :-)
  4. Ok,I'll wait until March then. Perhaps I'll see some of you there. Thanks for the help all!
  5. Thanks Brian. One more GDC question if you don't mind - do you have any idea roughly how many exhibitors there will be at GDC Next as opposed to GDC? The GDC Next website mentions GDC Online 2012 having 100+ exhibitors and 2,800 attendees, but I'm not sure exactly what the relationship is between GDC Online and GDC Next. The GDC website states 23,000 attendees and I can't find the amount of exhibitors.   If GDC is that much bigger, I'll probably wait until March.  
  6. Thank you so much for checking out my soundcloud Noisecrime, and for the wealth of information - it's truly appreciated! This was clearly the right forum to come to :-)   I put together a new, very short showreel from "Endworlds" last night, which I was hoping would be my "go-to" demo showreel for games, particularly fantasy/sci-fi etc:   https://soundcloud.com/jamiesalisbury/endworlds-short-showreel   If anyone has time to listen and feedback I'd really appreciated it - it's only 3 minutes long. I'm really interested as to why my music "doesn't sound like games music". I know you said you couldn't put your finger on it, but if anyone else has time to listen and can put their finger on it I'd love to know! I know structurally of course it will be different, but in terms of the tone and style I'd love to know peoples thoughts. Re: style - I'm sure that's true, although I think it's something that is impossible to know from my point of view as I can't be objective about it. I'm definitely a jack of all trades (see "iPod shuffle" on my soundcloud for an extreme example!), which is both a blessing and a curse of course.  When you're talking about "lower-paid" indie games, is it possible to give me an idea of the sort of fees you're talking about? I'm really happy to work for a quality project for a lower fee, I just need to make sure I get paid enough to justify doing the work to my family at this point.  I won't respond to every point so as not to clutter the thread, but I'm taking everything onboard, agree with you on most points and will follow up all your links. Thanks again! Jamie P.S I've got other tracks in mind to demo different styles, won't expect anyone to listen, but in case anyone's curious and has any thoughts for me: https://soundcloud.com/jamiesalisbury/monsters-vs-pirates (fun, happy, main theme) https://soundcloud.com/jamiesalisbury/imagem-us-drama-album-excerpts (Moody, introspective, atmospheric) https://soundcloud.com/jamiesalisbury/sets/end-game (thriller, action)
  7. Thanks for the views. I think there's probably some truth in both your views - I'm sure I don't NEED to be a regular gamer to get a job. Especially if my music really speaks to a developer as perfect for their game, then they won't care in the least. I was hired for an iOS game last year with no questions about my gaming experience. However I think for my purposes of approaching developers and needing to persuade them to hire me, or at least, I would benefit hugely from being a gamer as Brian states. At least being able to reel off a few examples of games I enjoy and game scores I like, at the very minimum.  But also in terms of my ability to do the job if/when I am hired - the way music is integrated is key to the result and I'm not going to get a deep understanding of that without playing the latest games. At the lower/simpler level (for instance the iOS game I composed for), you can watch a few videos and then write as if you're writing for TV or whatever, it's easy enough to do. But when we're talking about console games with interactive music involved then I'll need a deeper understanding about the way it feels to be immersed in that kind of world.  Hence my plan - I've just borrowed a friends Xbox 360 for a few days, and will invest in a PS4 or Xbox One as soon as they come out in the UK. Apart from anything, it'll be fun - I only ever stopped gaming because it took up too much time, it wasn't through lack of motivation!
  8. On another note, I tried following Leon Whittle's advice from the link in Frob's reply to try and find what games are in development. Unfortunately 2 of his links don't work and the other just has about 10 titles all released this year. Google doesn't seem to be helping me out either.  Has anyone got any advice about how I can find out what games are being released in 2014/15 and beyond?
  9. Thanks so much Brian. I'm very seriously considering coming over in November for both GameSoundCon and GDC Next. Tempted to do GDC in March as well to be honest, although I'll have to consider family needs and finances of course. Yes, I know CD's are old-fashioned, but I've got some good looking ones that I can at least wave at people before I give them a business card!   Thanks again for all your help.
  10. I've just realised GDC Next (Nov) is sooner than GDC (March next year). How do you think it would compare in terms of my aims - i.e wandering around with a stack of CD's trying to meet the right people? Would the same companies be likely to be present at both?
  11. Thanks so much Brian. I've seen G.A.N.G mentioned a few times, but wasn't expecting the president to reply to my question!! Haha. Brilliant. I'll check it out soon and see about signing up. Looks like GDC is a no-brainer, will be an expensive trip, but I'm always prepared to speculate to accumulate. I've not played games in about 10 years, but that's purely because I just saw them as a time-suck and a distraction from my work at the time - if anything I enjoyed them too much! My plan is to get one of the new generation consoles when they come out. I'm really looking forward to it, because I can now just enjoy gaming without guilt because it's research now! I'm sure the changes since I last played will be jaw-dropping. I just attended Game Music Connect in London with Jason Graves, Marty O'Donnell, Jesper Kyd, Joris de Man, Alistair Lindsay (Sony) and Paul Lipson (Microsoft) - I learned a HECK of a lot in 8 hours! Amazing guys without exception. Lots of fascinating stuff about interactive music in particular.  If your event is similar then I'd highly recommend it to others, although it's unlikely I'll be able to afford the time/expense to come over for it myself.  I have written one iOS game (as yet unreleased) but it was an enjoyable experience and as you say, paid surprisingly well.   Thanks again, I may well be in touch re: GANG.  
  12. Well people say that about film...and TV, and any good creative industry....it's true to earn a living as a composer you've got to beat off a lot of competition for the jobs and I'm not moving towards games because I think it'll be easy pickings. But from what I learned at Games Music Connect, there are opportunities if you're good enough, and it's an expanding industry, unlike Hollywood for example, for which opportunities are getting ever slimmer and budgets ever tighter.
  13. Thanks Tom, that's useful advice. I'll check out those sites. Unfortunately it seems I just missed the big UK conference "Develop" by a couple of weeks. Re: the worth of me attending GDC - do you have any idea how likely it is that a U.S company would use a UK composer, rather than someone local? From my perspective there's no issue at all in working remotely and I do it all the time, but I just wondered if you knew what the games industry perspective was likely to be.  Thanks for 2b in particular - I'm coming from a position of no knowledge of the games industry whatsoever, so even just getting the hang of understanding what job titles to look for is very useful.
  14. Thanks, appreciate the link.  To be clear - I'm not looking for big bucks at all. Just enough to justify my time - I've got a family to support, I'm not fresh out of college so I just can't do those free/micro budget gigs anymore. I'm pretty good at what I do, so I don't think it's unrealistic to aim a little higher. That's what I meant by "reasonable budget". I know what the top end budgets are like and I know I won't get that straight out of the gate, as nice as it would be!
  15. Hi all, I'd be very grateful for some advice if you can spare the time.   I'm a professional composer - just to give you an idea of the level I'm working at (I'm not attempting self-promotion here!) I've done a little TV, short films, a commercial for a major mobile phone company, theatre music, soundtracks for contemporary dance and production music for the likes of EMI/KPM, Immediate Music, Cavendish and Abaco. These soundtracks include live symphonic orchestral scores, recording in London, Prague and Budapest and mixing and mastering at Abbey Road.   Following a day at the Games Music Connect conference, it's dawned on me that I'd really love to compose for games, and that my music and way of working is also very much suited to it. Problem is I have hardly any contacts in the world of gaming (having just written for one iOS game a couple of years back) and haven't played games (for time reasons, not motivation!) for about 10 years. I'm too busy to justify starting at the bottom of the ladder, writing for peanuts to get established, but at the same time I have no illusions that I'll be writing for AAA titles with little prior games music experience.   So I need to present my showreel to companies working at a decent level, but probably not wasting my time with sending my showreel to Sony until I have a few good games under my belt! Question is, how do I know which companies to approach - ones that will have a reasonable budget for music?  And secondly - would a plane ticket to GDC next year be worth the cost and time (I'm based in London)? Can you suggest any other ways I can meet suitable developers?  If it helps to know what my music sounds like, search for me (Jamie Salisbury) on Soundcloud and listen to "Endworlds Showreel" (didn't want to link directly as I wasn't sure about the rules on self-promotion here).   Any advice would be really appreciated! Thanks   Jamie