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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

legitninja

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  1.     Thank you for being understanding. I was watching a video where game industry professionals/ established people in the gaming industry (Triple A commercial devs and indie alike, even though personally I don't like the term "indie' as we're all game developers just making games at varying quality.)    In that video Notch made the suggestion of getting code off the internet and playing around with the code and then creating a game, not your biggest game, but something manageable and that you can actually finish.   Thanks again for being understanding, I'll take your words to heart.
  2.   Thanks, I'll try to do that or make something that's basic enough but will help me find my way around Unity and coding in it.       Thank you for the tips, I appreciate it
  3.     Thanks, I'll give that a read.
  4. Thanks guys, this is really insightful and helpful information.
  5.   Ah, so it's more about getting a game done even if it's a buggy mess and not that good. I may try one.         Thanks for that, it really boosted my confidence and motivation levels. It's not to know that everyone goes through it and I'm not obligated to memorize and know how to do everything. I may actually keep a notebook laying around (Heck, I already have one full of game ideas, designs, mechanics, and stories hahaha)   Right now, my main focus is making a 2d puzzle platformer with my friend. It's something we're both very passionate about and we want to do things that I'm not to sure how to do (Since I'm the programmer and he's the artist) this is the first game for both of us and we plan on putting it on Kongregate, we're learning things about game design and keeping the scope small and manageable.   Man, was it good to know that even the pros deal with not remembering things, so I'm not alone it seems. That gives me a lot of hope :) Thank you both for the suggestions and advice.
  6. Hello fellow game developers,   I made a post here about 8-9 months ago asking for advice on where to start and you guys were a great help.   I started using Unity after I had a thorough grasp on the fundamentals and syntax of C#. I haven't made any fully fledged games, however I have made small projects like a coin collection game, simple pathfinding A.I. (that moves between 3 points and loops continously), a top down space game where you shoot asteroids for points. To name a few, these were merely small projects that I felt like doing to get a grasp of game coding and the Unity engine.   So here I am 9 months later and it seems that whenever I try to do something, the first thing I go look for is a tutorial. I know it maybe nothing be it's a be demotivating. It seems like I'm just too afraid/ not confident enough to try to do things on my own. I know I have the potential to but it just feels like I need to look at a tutorial for everything.   When I finish the tutorial, I retain some of the information, but when I try to recreate it on my own I find it difficult.   Maybe this is nothing, and it's probably what everyone went through/ is going through. I really don't know what to do or what to think.   Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.    
  7.   That's what they all say.... that's what they all say... hah   No worries my friend. I'm 15 and also want to take up a career in game development/ game programming. I just started learning how to code 3 weeks ago. I've accomplished a simple text game about escaping a spaceship. It was difficult but once you get it and see all your hard work payed off. It's marvelous.   I'm learning the C# programming language so I bought a "for Dummies" book.    The best advice I can give for you and your son is it depends on his learning style and how he wants to go about it.   Also programming does require some wicked math knowledge so, he should get good in math if he isn't already. Although most of it is theoretical and probability. A computer science major in college often has you taking "2" math courses usually Calculus.   As stated earlier the more knowledge pre- college the better really. Good luck to your son and may his programming dreams come true :D 
  8. I'm a beginner learning C# which is the "latest" installment in the C family of programming languages. Unlike C++ the C# language is very "high level" which means you do everything on the highest level without having to go into much detail with memory management and such. In fact C# almost resembles Java.   But, it is still Object Oriented Programming (OOP) so what you learn there can be translated to other object oriented programming languages (C++ included)   but, if you want to learn C++ go ahead but it will take significantly longer to get a grasp of it. which is why people suggest learning python, Java, or C# first because you will see results for your work etc.   I just started learning how to program about a week ago, so I have a long way to go. I did a simple text based choose your own adventure game in C#. I even had it so that you could enter a name for your character and enter a name for your spaceship which the game used from that point on. It was cool and I'm proud of myself.   But, all that I learned was with tutorials on youtube and they don't go too in-depth. So, today I went out to the book store and bought C# for dummies. I haven't started reading it yet but, hopefully it can explain things in more detail.
  9.   Actually I just checked C# is a Unity supported language along with java.   I never really thought of learning C# in conjunction with Unity
  10. Started working on my choose your own adventure text game in a Consoleapp.   I thought it would be difficult but it's really just a lot of   Console.WriteLine("text"; Console.WriteLine("more text");   Console.WriteLine("        ");     a bunch of If statements like     If firstchoice = 1   a lot of user input and such.   It's not hard but, it's easy to get confused if you don't know what you're doing. I'm making a choose your own adventure text game so i can make sure I got most of what I learned down then I can move on to maybe a pong replica or something in XNA or something but. I still have a lot to learn. 
  11. I'm not too certain that it does but, I'll look into it
  12.     Yeah MMOs take a while to develop. It can take up to half a decade even for big time studios some times. Thanks for the advice!   Right now I'm reading some online C# books and references and looking at beginner's tutorials and such on Youtube.   I actually also made a google doc and stuffed it full of C#/ and coding things. I wrote down what an Int was, what a string was how to get simple player input in a console application. easier ways to do math functions while still getting the same result. I'm always updating that google doc when I learn more things about programming and C# 
  13. thank you for the advice! I know I have a long way to go. hopefully after a year and a half I can make a simple game using XNA or Unity. but more now I have to experiment. that's basically what coding comes down to I assume.. experimenting and seeing what works. :)
  14. Hi, I've always been fascinated by the concept of video games. I'm 15 years old in High School. I decided a few weeks ago that I wanted to get into the video game development field. I want to be a programmer and to make my own/ help make games.     Here's my history with video games.   The first time I played a video game was when I was 6 and I my family had a playstation 2. The first video game I ever played was Need For Speed: Hot Pursuit. After that I basically fell in love with video games.   When I was 7 my dad bought me and xbox and the first game I got for that was Star Wars Battlefront 2. After that I accmulated over 40 games for the xbox over the course of 4 years. Then I got an xbox 360 with Xbox Live and started playing games like Midnight Club L.A., Bad Company 2. Then i started playing Halo 3 with my friends and that basically hooked me on shooters. Currently I play Battlefield 3 and Halo 4.   Also when I was 8 I signed up for Roblox which is a world creator/ game designer for kids. It uses Lua scripting and I never dabbled into the scripting side of it because I was a bit too young to understand it all too well.      But, as I said I knew game development was for me.    I downloaded Visual Studio 2012. Currently I'm watching tutorials and reading online resources for C#.   I chose C# because from my knowledge it was easier to learn than C++. Also i chose something a bit simpler because from what I gathered online and from these forums. Once you learn one programming language you can basically learn them all because most of them use the same basic things.   like ints, strings, console commands, loops, breaks etc.   I just started learning C# yesterday so i have a long way to go.   But, right now while I'm learning I'm also going to make a simple console text-based game. Basically a choose your own adventure game that has 2 choices for each scenario and you choose those two choices by press either "1" or "2" on the keyboard respectively.   I'm also very good at using GIMP. but, I haven't used it for textures yet.   I'm also learning how to use blender to make models and assets for 3D games.   But, with all this I'm sort of lost. I need a bit of guidance. What should I focus on the most and why? What resources should I use to help me learn C# and game programming in general?   Also from what I under stand it can take up to 5 months to a year to learn a programming language. Is there a concrete time frame for learning a programming language?   thanks