ml_

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  1. How to stick on slopes?

    It appears that your character is working in a low-gravity environment, and he's not sticking to the ground because the speed at which he falls (y) is relatively slow compared with his horizontal speed (x). You could increase the gravity only when there are sloping tiles. Something like: if tile == slanted && player_movement == walking #(not jumping / airborne)   player.y += 2.0 #high gravity else   player.y += 0.5 #low gravity end That way you'll have the usual low gravity unless he's on a slanted tile. If you post some of your code, or even better, upload to github and post the link, you should be able to get a more detailed answer.
  2. Help with Game engines.

    For what you're describing, I would say, Unity, Unity, Unity, Unity. You could accomplish everything you described with Unity.
  3. Extreme Beginner Help!

    Hi Cody, this is a great question and it gets asked a LOT. Whatever happens, DO NOT ASK THIS QUESTION ON STACKOVERFLOW because you will get excoriated!! (LOL) The very first thing you absolutely need is a good text editor (better than Notepad), such as Sublime Text 2. The most important thing is to get a text editor which highlights code in different colors making it at least fifty times easier to understand what's going on.   Here is a simple javascript example game. When you check it out, make sure to view the source code, and copy and paste it into your text editor for testing. You can make changes to the code, save the changes, and view the file in your web browser to see the changes.   Whatever programming language you end up using, it will function in more or less in the same way as the javascript example game.   With regard to what language to use, I think the following comments from boogyman19946 (in a different post) are spot on:   "Start with a language that provides a minimal amount of control so that you can accomplish what you want. There is no reason to choose a behemoth like C++ because it's "faster" or because it gives you "more control." You're not programming task schedulers, you're learning to make a game. You don't need the extra control! It only adds complexity and makes things harder. When the time comes that you need the proverbial speed of a compiled language, you'll quickly realize that picking up C++ isn't as hard as it would have seemed at first because you'll know most of what you need already."   In the spirit of boogyman19946's comments, I recommend starting out with Ruby, using the Gosu Gem. Ruby is the easiest mainstream language to learn, and once you get comfortable with it, all the other programming languages will begin to make sense. Here is a comment which somebody made on the Gosu Forums, which expresses how many people feel about Gosu:   "A lot of....kids (not me, ok...me too...), struggle with RPG Maker xp/vx/2003/etc. Well tonight I downloaded Chris Pines Pragmatic Programming - Learn to Program Ruby and that makes it at LOT easier.  And I get so frustrated with RPG Maker VX because I can't find everything to help me understand.  Like the Window_Base script inherits from Window and that script isn't in the script list for editing... But THANK GOD (like really, thank you God) I found Gosu."   Another bonus of Ruby is that it is the language of Rails (the future of web development). If you are on a PC, installing Ruby is really easy.   Here is what the javascript example game from above looks like in Ruby: require 'chingu' include Gosu class Game < Chingu::Window   def initialize     super(600,400,false)     self.caption = "Simple Game"     self.input = [:holding_left, :holding_right, :holding_up, :holding_down, :esc]     @player = Chingu::GameObject.create(:image => Image["face.png"], :x => 30, :y => 70)   end   def holding_left;   @player.x -= 3;  puts "left";   end   def holding_right;  @player.x += 3;  puts "right";  end   def holding_up;     @player.y -= 3;  puts "up";     end   def holding_down;   @player.y += 3;  puts "down";   end   def esc;  exit;  end end Game.new.show Definitely simpler and easier to learn than javascript or C++.   Python is also pretty easy to get started with, using Pygame. Java is good for starting out too.   PickupSticks is a great suggestion for a first game to try making.
  4. Beginner in Programming for games help please

    If you are absolutely just getting started, here is a really basic javascript example game. If you just view the source code, and copy and paste it into your text editor, you will be able to look at it and figure out what it does. You can make changes to the code, and then just save and view the file in your internet browser to see the effects. Whatever language you use, the code will basically function more or less like that example.   If you plan to learn Rails someday so that you can earn lots of money as a Rails developer, then you might try the Gosu gem, which runs on Ruby. Installing Ruby is really easy and so is installing Gosu. In my opinion, Ruby-based Gosu is the easiest programming language/platform to learn out of all languages and platforms. Boogeyman19946's comments are spot on. Once you learn to use Ruby, all the other programming languages will make more sense. There is also a C++ version of Gosu, which has faster processing speed, but is not as easy to learn.   Just for the sake of comparison, here is the same game as the javascript example, written in Ruby: require 'chingu' include Gosu class Game < Chingu::Window   def initialize     super(600,400,false)     self.caption = "Simple Game"     self.input = [:holding_left, :holding_right, :holding_up, :holding_down, :esc]     @player = Chingu::GameObject.create(:image => Image["face.png"], :x => 30, :y => 70)   end   def holding_left;   @player.x -= 3;  puts "left";   end   def holding_right;  @player.x += 3;  puts "right";  end   def holding_up;     @player.y -= 3;  puts "up";     end   def holding_down;   @player.y += 3;  puts "down";   end   def esc;  exit;  end end Game.new.show
  5. Wow that is pretty inspirational. I've bookmarked this article.
  6. building/making a game: where to start?

    My personal opinion is that if you want to make an RPG, the easiest way to proceed would be to find an existing RPG and copy the source code in its entirety, make sure you can get it to work on your system, and then go in and start changing things around and customizing it. I think you can learn more about cars by working on a actual functioning car, then by trying to create a new car from scratch.
  7. Here is a simple C++ tutorial for use with the Gosu library.
  8. Beginning

    I am a huge fan of Gosu. I use the Ruby version, but there is a C++ version of Gosu as well. It is basically a library which gives you a bunch of built-in functions to work with (collision detection, velocity, etc.) so you don't have to "recreate the wheel" so to speak. There are a lot of working games and examples which you can try out and -- most importantly -- you can look at the code to see how they work (easier way to learn than reading a book in my opinion). Here is a link to the Gosu C++ rdocs, which gives an overview of the different built-in functions.
  9. If you have already been working in html and css, I would think that javascript could be a natural next step. There is a good javascript library called pixi.js, which should theoretically work on all browsers and most smart phones (if configured properly). Here is a webpage with several pixi.js examples, if you want to check it out. From your browser, view the source code of any of the examples to get a look at how the coding works. You can also check out the gtihub version of the examples for a detailed look at the code involved.   As far as working on video games with your daughter -- I have been making video game prototypes for my own daughter using Gosu, a powerful, but easy-to-use 2D game engine using Ruby. A lot of people might say, "No, don't use Ruby. Use C++. C++ is for grownups. Ruby is for babies." To such comments I would say, "Exactly." Ruby is so easy to use that there is a guy literally teaching ten-year-olds to create video games with Ruby. Also, Ruby is the language of Rails. If you ever want to learn to develop Rails applications, Ruby would give you a good foundation.   Gosu does not automatically work on smart phones, but it the easiest way I know of to make 2D video games on your computer. If you are interested to check out Gosu you would need to install Ruby. If you are on Windows you would want to use the Ruby Installer, make sure you get version 1.9.3 (not 2.0.0), and when you're installing check all three boxes for installation options, unless you have reason to do otherwise. Once Ruby is installed you can launch the terminal by going to All Programs --> Ruby1.9.3 --> Command Prompt With Ruby.   From the terminal you would run the following commands: > gem install bundler > gem install gosu > gem install chingu   And from there your environment would be all set up (assuming you already have a text editor such as SublimeText2 or the like).   To check out Gosu, you could try out any one of the games from the Gosu Showcase Forum.   A good overall example of the different capabilities of Gosu is a mashup I made of several different tutorial examples:   Chingu Example Loader   Here are a few thumbnails of some Gosu examples and Gosu games:                             As I was going through looking for thumbnails, I came across some comments which generally reflect how a lot of people feel about Gosu:   "A lot of....kids (not me, ok...me too...), struggle with RPG Maker xp/vx/2003/etc.   Well tonight I downloaded Chris Pines Pragmatic Programming - Learn to Program Ruby and that makes it at LOT easier.   And I get so frustrated with RPG Maker VX because I can't find everything to help me understand.   Like the Window_Base script inherits from Window and that script isn't in the script list for editing... But THANK GOD (like really, thank you God) I found Gosu."
  10. PUTT People's Choice Award and Comments

    Thank you @riuthamus for your scorecards. Even though my game apparently didn't make the cut, I was cheering for all the other guys as I read over your scoring and comments.   Let's see here.... it is now November 17th, so I guess this means that any minute now like seven more judges are going to be suddenly posting all kinds of scores and results. It would be really cool to see some more judge scorecards.   This has been a great competition with a really great concept, and lots of fantastic entries. Thanks to gamedev.net and Alpha_ProgDes for putting it together.   Some of the other contestants have mentioned the possibility of working together on a future project as a team, and I would say definitely count me in. My ideal game development dream team would include all of the participants in this contest, including zomgbie, wintertime, Noctumus, Aspirer, crow007, segmented, shadowisadog, Mippy, LucentBeam, vortex, staunsholm... everyone. Or at least as many as possible. Just imagine what we could create if we made something together. This brings me to an important question:   If such a dream team were to be formed, what type of programming language would be best to work in?...   My vote would be pixi.js, which is basically a javascript game engine which works in all browsers as well as working on mobile devices (if configured properly).   I created a simple website with a bunch of pixi.js examples which should work in any browser, and some of the examples work on iPhone Android etc. Just viewing the source code on some of the examples should provide a basic overview of pixi.js, but if you want a more detailed look, here is the github version. Pixi could be an interesting platform for developing a team project. I would also be down to work on a different platform if people have other preferences.   Also, what would the game concept be? I would say that simple is better than complex..... although.... it might be cool to make a platformer.... or a RealTimeStrategy game........   Does anyone have any game concept ideas to share?
  11. Where to start?

      I think pixi.js comes pretty close to being the magical tool you are looking for. It allows for the use of lots of plug-ins and .js libraries, which can be tailor-suited to the specific needs of your application.
  12. Where to start?

    Hey sounds like a cool project. I would recommend checking out pixi.js. It claims to do everything you are describing, working in all browsers and on mobile devices as well.   Here is a page with several working pixi examples, which you can check out:   http://pacific-waters-2592.herokuapp.com/   That should give you a good overview of what can be accomplished these days with basic html and detailed javascript. Pixi has support for webGL, but also works on older browsers which don't have webGL.   If you are interested to look "under the hood", so to speak, here is a github repo which is identical to the website linked above:   https://github.com/MattLemmon/pixies   I would be happy to try to help you move forward on your project in any way possible, and I would be glad to barter for accounting services if it gets to that point.   EDIT: You could also check out http://pacific-waters-2592.herokuapp.com/files/ and http://pacific-waters-2592.herokuapp.com/assets/ to get a sense of how some of the .js file structure works on a live website.   EDIT: You mentioned jquery. Some of the examples linked above use jquery.min.js and jquery-1.8.3.min.js.   EDIT: By the way, do you have any experience working with a text editor (vim, Sublime, etc.)? If you don't already have a beefy text editor (in addition to Word and Notepad), I recommend installing Sublime Text 2. Also, what OS are you on? (Windows 7, Mac 10.6, Linux, etc?)
  13. PUTT Updates and Finals Thread

    Here is an updated and improved link for the .app for Mac of StickBall: StickBall for Mac (zip file)   Also, for anyone who installed Ruby but didn't get StickBall to work with Ruby, I have identified the problem.   The big issue is that Gosu needs to be version 0.7.48.   $ gem install gosu -v 0.7.48 $ gem install chingu   Thought I'd post in case anyone wants to try out Gosu or play with the StickBall code.
  14. PUTT People's Choice Award and Comments

      Yours is among those I have not played yet. I will try it out later today when I have access to a PC.     It does! Cool game     Thanks, glad to hear it worked!