• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Shade.

Members
  • Content count

    18
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

199 Neutral

About Shade.

  • Rank
    Member
  1. Lol Hey there man. Just let me say thank you for bothering to try it out. The responses below are just to answer your questions. They are "not" legitimizations as to why the game plays the way it does.  The robot sword swinging animation is...there because that portion is supposed to be replaced by an opening cut scene, but we just had that as a place holder. From Soy Sauce is the name of our group who made the game. The name is a spin off of PlayStation's "FromSoftware". We all liked soy sauce so it became our name.  There is full screen if you read the text document then it tells you how to do it. We just thought some people might not want it in full screen initially.    The menu is not really finished, so we just made the 3 missions accessible and playable right from the main menu.   And we have decided that there will be a simple, almost tutorial level, at the beginning of the game to slowly get you accustomed to how to play it.    In that mission you are a commander-    We thought that people would read the controls in the main menu, and learn how to control the game from there. We made the controls as simple as we could. But we also realized, again, people don't read controls, and we again just need to ease them in with that tutorial level.   The sword is one weapon, if you scroll up and down on the mouse you can change to a different weapon that has range.    You probably missed the enemy in front of you if he didn't die.    Alright, so do you have any specific recommendations then? Thanks again for your time man- -Shade-
  2. So for the exact reasons that you did not find our games enjoyable is probably the same mindset that people did not find your game enjoyable or bother to try it. They either didn't like the type of game you made, didn't like the graphics, or thought it was too simple, not engaging, etc. And the same way you can very casually label off and give our games a low score is probably the same type of mindset other people had when playing your game as well. The same way you have no idea how much effort, design thought, and time we had to muster in order to make these small projects, the players don't know (or really care either) how much effort you put into making your game. All they see is the final product and they "are" comparing them to the "best" indie games out there. If you fall short in one category or another, then your game is not worth playing. It's a harsh world for indie game developers. No one care's about your idea, and unless you can make it look and feel like something fun, no one cares how original, or how hard it must have been to make it.    It's hard, but there really must be a balance between, "I want to make my own idea my way" and "but will people like it if I do it that way?". Like I said, don't let yourself get down. Refine your game, OR in my opinion, just make a better one-
  3. My bad Frob. I did try to look for this thread in older sections of the forum, but I couldn't find one that was directly relatable to my topic.  And thank you for the responses. It seems like I'd probably get away with what I'm doing, But I should really try my best to make up my own jets at this rate. Maybe combining two real ones into one made up one I guess.  All the advice was really helpful guys, thank you!
  4. Hello everyone. I was wondering about using military jets in a game. I read a similar thread about gun copyrights and it seemed that as long as you change the name of the gun, you're OK. So, I am wondering if I create a 3D model of a F22-Raptor and call it like "M33-Vega" and give it a different color scheme, etc. Is that still against the law?    Thank you for your time!
  5. I wouldn't say that you should be depressed about it. I worked on a game for about 7 months (It's a 9 month project). I made all the graphics for the characters and animations, and like 70% of the soundtrack. My two brothers programmed and made levels for it. We made a demo just to get a taste of how it would be received, and a lot of the responses in general were 50% neutral, 30% negative, and 20% positive.    Now, as the developer of the game, am I depressed? I think my feeling was more like "Aw man, oh well let's see what I can learn from this". I learned that retro 3D graphics are no longer a good thing, people will judge a book by it's cover, and judge whether the game is good or not before they download it. You shouldn't expect players to have the patience to figure things out, you need to cleverly guise instructions in the form of a basic level.  It was the first game to put our name out there. And as the first game, we are just happy it's almost done so that we can make something better right afterwards. You just gota keep going and making them better and better, and then if you finally make a good one, hopefully people will try the older games you made before you had a popular one. And then it will be appreciated then. That's how I see it. I'm not depressed, and I don't think you should. Rather, just be happy that you made a game and be proud of it. Make a better one and try to publicize it better. And for the love of god, don't make games for money- Make them because you want to let people experience an idea you thought would be fun.  For anyone that cares, the game I am working on, and almost done with, it's name is "Spheroid" and you can find it in the "indie project" forum area of gamedev.net here: http://www.gamedev.net/topic/649361-spheroid/   Keep at it man- It's really unrealistic to expect for the first game to be successful anyway. lol  
  6. Fair enough- lol  I guess the rest just comes down to how it all comes together in the hands of the designer-
  7. As a fan of city builders I need to strongly disagree here What city builders? Crappy Cities XL? Pathetic SimCity 4-5? Sorry, I don't see all these city builders. Actually I can't find even ONE I could play. I don't want them to be "different", I don't want the ability to "import sims", I don't want full 3D pixel perfect map where everything has different shape and you can't align anything.   I DO want the standard overused SimCity 2000 or Pharaoh or other clear grid based city builder (where I can see how much space I have left). I would definitely buy a standard oldstyle traditional city builder game (and preferably without any combat unless it's made as skilfully as in Caesar/Pharaoh series). Actually, I hate no one make these anymore     Like I said, this genre is not my expertise. However my point was to give the player a reason to play your city builder over other city builders. It's like making another metal gear, just like the first metal gear on the PlayStation 1. Why would I play your version of metal gear if it's just like the original, when I can just play the original? There should be your own spin on it that the player doesn't really get often from the other games similar to it.    This is just my opinion though. Best of luck- -Shade-
  8. I think you'd got a nice idea, you just have to find a way to make it different from all the "city builder" games already out there that are similar. I don't specialize in this sort of game so I can't give many ideas. I definitely like the military aspect of it though. Keep that if you can. Maybe your city will normally come under attack and you have to defend it more than in other games.   Any idea can be good if presented the right way. Hope that helps-
  9. I see your point, and I definitely agree with it. I usually very proudly tell people where I get the original and made the remix based off of it. And if I do post songs that are obviously remixed off another then I'll continue to put that up front. I'm probably not going to sell the game that uses these tracks, and I highly doubt it will get very famous. But on the off case that it does, I am ready to take them out of the game or make something to replace them.    Thank you everyone, you've definitely helped me to learn where the lines are between an original song, remix, and a song inspired by another. I have already gone back into my "soundcloud" and explained that those two songs are remixes of the original and credited the original developers-   -Shade-
  10. Alright, so I can totally understand the second song "Autobahn" getting me in trouble for sounding too similar. What about the first song? You said Rythms and chords cannot be copyrighted right? Well the only part that sounds similar is the beginning, which is essentially just a rhythm. The rest of it, I just picked notes that were in the same key signature, but I don't feel like I copied the melody.    What do you think?
  11. Not that I plan on getting famous, but just hypothetically, lets just talk about the first song, what do you think I would have to change in order for me to be able to safely say, it's a different song?    And Nsmadsen, I agree with you. I am trying to learn to make music by starting with remixing my favorite songs, and then I hope to make my own completely original later.    On a second thought. Is it safe to say that as long as I don't sell my game, I can use a remix of another song in my game and not worry about people trying to sue me? Assuming the game happens to become famous-   Thanks again,   -Shade-
  12. Hello everyone. I'd like your opinion on certain questions regarding indie game music.    At what point would you consider a song inspired by another song a different song? Is a song that uses the same chords and tempo of a song but different lyrics still the same song? If you recreate a song from scratch to sound like another song and use your own vocal samples instead of the original and change the lyrics is it still the same song?  Would you dislike a good song because it got it's chords and structure from another song?    My reason for asking is because for much of my music I take certain parts of songs that I like and then make up the rest to fill in for the parts of the original song I didn't like.    Two examples of my dilemma can be found here: ------------------- My Version: BB https://soundcloud.com/shade-15/bb   Original Song: Bullet Ballet (Armored Core 2 Another Age Soundtrack) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0To1HgYpGs ------------------   My Version: Autobahn Runway https://soundcloud.com/shade-15/runway   Original Song: Autobahn (Armored Core Nexus) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB0pALJZ6wY   Do you think I would get in trouble with my songs? Would you consider them remixes? Or different songs?    Thank you for your time! -Shade-
  13. Personally I think that it's not the textures that seem "cartoony". I think it is actually the style of the 3D models and texture maps are simpler.    Texture-wise, they do show wear-and-tear effects. Such as in this screen shot: http://images.onlinegamesinn.com/Alien%20Swarm2.jpg   However, especially looking at the player models: http://static.gamesradar.com/images/mb/GamesRadar/us/Daily/2010/07-Jul/20/Valve%20promo/alien-swarm2--article_image.jpg   Simply put, the models are comprised of less objects. And the texture maps have less detail. It's definitely a combination of fewer 3D objects in the room, and less detailed texture maps.  Just look at these two comparisons. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5Psek4tWXqI/Tz5apbKe0rI/AAAAAAAACDM/SUbEJvl4pUM/s1600/Alien-Swarm_2.jpg http://www.onlysp.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Dead_Space_3_13449647107732.jpg   The "Dead Space" guys suite is just made of a lot more parts, and the texture maps for it are also more detailed with more contrasting colors. The Alien Swarm levels don't have as many pipes, cracks, edges, etc.    One last thing worth mentioning, the 'Alien Swarm' graphics might look a little more "cartoony" because the designs for the 3D models themselves look kinda generic and outdated. Compare the helmets for the two games I posted links to. "Alien Swarm" helmets are basically a circle with a glowing visor. That's what makes it look cartoony. That's just my opinion though.  
  14. That was all very useful advice from all of you. I'll definitely keep it in mind.   Thank you so much everyone for the insight!   -Shade-
  15. Hello, my question is how to teach the player how to understand and navigate through the controls of the game in the guise of a normal level. What would be an ideal set of rooms, and what would be in those rooms to get the player comfortable with the later more advanced stages?    My reason for asking this, is my brothers and I recently released a game (can be found in the indie-game forum section: http://www.gamedev.net/topic/649361-spheroid/#entry5104428), and was met with a lot of players saying that the game was too hard, or too confusing, or was not very well explained. So, I'd really like to change that, and we have decided that before any missions, the first "mission" should be specifically designed to get the player familiar with the game.    Things I want the player to be familiar with: -Controls for character- -Reading Radar- -identifying- -unlocking doors- -collecting all items in the area-   This might make a lot more sense if you try the game. But even just in theory, the main thing is getting the player accustomed to the controls. I got the basic idea of having a single simple enemy in the room. But should I just have a text message (from a character) tell you "fire with left click"? Or should I just let them figure it out?   Thank you for your time,    -Shade-