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the_cheetah

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About the_cheetah

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  1. the_cheetah

    I'll crit yours - you crit mine

    "They" do share scripts (I've shared mine with half a dozen people). They just don't usually slap it up in completeness on a public internet forum. Just like you wouldn't upload your Unity stages or your props for everyone to take. You may put a GIF on facebook to get some feedback, but you don't upload your Maya files. A game script doesn't have to be multiple times the length of a film script, unless it's an AAA title and you're counting all the dialogue lines from interactive NPC dialogue. Mine is just rough gameplay description (details are up to level designers etc) and cinematic cutscenes. It's in a format similar to what's called "script-ment" in film. It is for an independent game and it's 200 pages 12 point script with large margins and lots of film script-formatted dialogue. All the game scripts people shared with me so far have looked different, btw. There's no Hollywood standard in games.
  2. the_cheetah

    I'll crit yours - you crit mine

    Sure, fire away. I'll PM you an equivalent amount of text back.
  3. the_cheetah

    I'll crit yours - you crit mine

    Can we get back to crits for crits?
  4. the_cheetah

    I'll crit yours - you crit mine

    I haven't seen too many game writers post complete scripts before the game shipped, or ever for that matter.
  5. I'm looking for other game writers to crit (give feedback on) my script or parts of it. In return, I'll crit (give feedback on) yours. An exchange. I have done this a handful of times with other writers; it is an excellent way to improve your writing. I have critted novels and game scripts of up to around 300 pages. I will crit anything. Anyone interested? I suggest we share links via private messages, since no one likes to post their entire script in public. Here's an excerpt from mine to prove I'm real.
  6.     This could be made to look significantly better with a little effort. Mostly by using stronger black outlines on the characters (such as in comics), not using plain white for the characters' bodies (some simple shading would go a long way), and most of all not using those green criscrossing lines in the background.   Use flat colours for the earth, sky and grass instead of low-res textures, make the blades of grass different heights and thicknesses, make the yellow lightbeam transparent, add blob shadows to characters, and redesign the UFO which is the shittiest looking thing in the image.   Also develop a 16 colour palette for the game and stick to it. The yellow and the blue are really clashing here.   I like the cow image a LOT better than the stars one, because the cow idea is less generic. In short, the cow game would probably be better, but might require some basic art practice on your part. Just study how comics are outlined and shaded, use some transparency, don't use plain white, and use a well defined palette instead of random colours.   Edit; also try working on the proportions of things (cows shouldn't be bigger than UFOs, characters shouldn't be half the screen height in a sidescroller (which this looks like). And try to avoid 90 degree angles on anything except maybe buildings.
  7. No software in the world will help you learn to draw; get some plain paper notebooks and a bunch of pencils and just have at it.
  8. the_cheetah

    Do you like my art?

    Looks ok. Of course there is also room for improvement.   You should start on shading - add light and shadows to your shapes to make them look more three-dimensional. Decide where you want to go with your art - game concepts, comics, illustration? For game characters, pay attention to recognizable shapes and silhouettes.   The forums at polycount and cgsociety have some great resource threads for 2D artists. Youtube has tons of good drawing tutorials as well. Keep at it.
  9. the_cheetah

    Designing visual style for a game

    Well, it helps to know what the world of your game is like. And what the culture of the characters is like. That should be reflected in the art.   Think about Starcraft for a moment; the three factions have very strong identities. Humans are messy (chronic smokers and drinkers, even) and like primitive looking Mad Max style stuff that always threatens to fall apart, protoss have their own colour scheme (gold and blue), esoteric energy thingies and very sleek curved shapes, Zerg have carapaces and creepy mutated biological stuff like teeth and horns, and their buildings look like twisted organs and innards. Their colour scheme is brownish violets with the occasional green acid. A humourous, whacky, slightly comicky style fits this game, although pseudorealistic might even work, too.   Or take the Witcher. It's a world full of poverty, discrimination, religious fanatics, shady characters. A serious world. Everyone runs a shady racket. As the protagonist, you are the outsider. Your people are exceptionally gifted, rich in tradition, but universally disliked. Those who employ you probably curse you behind your back. There is no clear distinction between good and evil. As a result, the art is grimy, fantastic, sometimes grotesque, but there is a hidden beauty and depth. A handpainted style and many shades of darkness fit this game.   Another example: Prey. Its world is a blend of the technological and the organic. As a result, for example the weapons look like living organs, and the hand grenades are exploding critters. Doors look like orifices. Other parts of the world are made of metal, but often look very curved and organic too (almost protoss-like.) The art style is somewhere between whacky, slimy organic and shiny, polished metal.   And of course, the original Portal. Doesn't it remind of an Apple product? A friendly robot voice with a cold calculation underneath it. Manipulation disguised as service. In Portal 2, you get to see behind the facade.   Finally, Mirror's Edge. I can't help but think of an IKEA shop when I look at it. It looks *clean*. Designed. As if the police state wanted to give itself a family-friendly yuppie image.   Look at many different games, and try to pick up on what the most visually memorable games do. Determine the identity, history and culture of your game world and its characters. Flesh out the world in your mind and write it all down. Talk about it with friends - they can often come up with vivid details and associations that enrich your setting. In other words, create a setting. If your world has different factions, create cultural identities for them (associate them with historical or mythical subcultures or species.) The art style will follow logically from that.   An artist's individual style will help, but art style and art direction should be rooted in the setting of the game.
  10. the_cheetah

    Getting analog art to digital

      You might tell your friend to try Mypaint instead of Gimp or Photoshop. She does not need to buy a Photoshop license in the beginning. Mypaint is a software *tailored* to digital painting whereas the others are general image editors that do a lot more than just the painting part. That can get in the way if all you want to do is paint. Mypaint also provides much better brushes than Gimp at least.   She can transfer images (with layers) between Gimp and Mypaint using the Open Raster format (.ora) and thus use each program where it excels - Mypaint for pure painting, Gimp for editing and filters.     Another trick is to tape a piece of paper over the tablet's drawing surface; this might make it *feel* more like drawing on paper.
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