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Akemi

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About Akemi

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  1. Akemi

    How does one create flexible pixel art?

      This is actually how sc1's art was done. Many other older games used this method.     Sounds like rendering 3D is one of the only options. Every other option kind of suffers from the problem of when you add a new pose, you need to go back and add animations for everything else (even if they're duplicates).   It
  2. Akemi

    How does one create flexible pixel art?

    Loads for me -- you can try a direct URL?   http://s29.postimg.org/ewh8tisl3/sprite_New.png   I've also attached it on a new domain here:   http://i.imgur.com/9rbtvoJ.png
  3. Before I begin, consider the following image:   There's a few things about this kind of sheet that makes me programmer side cringe a bit.   If you want to draw clothes on the base, you can simply overlay them. This is fine, but the work increases with each animation that is required. If you add new poses or animations, you must redraw sprites for each clothing piece to now match. This is a lot of work over time and a lot of work you might have to redo if you add even a single frame. This requires a pose and animation for each 'weapon slash' type.   How is this usually handled?
  4. My rationale is that it's a hassle (and inefficient) to call functions via reflection, but you have to use reflection at least once to run code in the script project, since the main project can't reference it directly. So I make a single function that I call with reflection, and have that function do the bulk of the work of "connecting" the script project to the main project. From that point on, the code can call functions "normally" to call functions in the script project. The ways that I "connect" the script project to the main project at runtime are: - The script project can register itself with public events in the main project. When those events get raised, the script project can handle them. - The script project can instantiate classes and then register those classes with the main project. This might mean creating some derived factory classes, "manager" objects, "game objects", or whatever else you might think of. - The script project can add itself to a list of objects that get called during the main update loop (this is implied in the previous line).     Just checking in to let you know everything worked out, thanks a lot!
  5. You do not need threading. Unless you explicitly call sync() or a similar system call, write() will simply copy the data into a kernel buffer and scheduled for I/O later, and will not block your application. And, in fact, you may want to simply write() each piece of data directly, because this will survive an application crash. write() on a raw file descriptor will survive a process crash as soon as the write() returns, whereas fwrite() needs a fflush() to get to that point. write() will not guarantee against a full system crash, though -- only sync() does that (and then again, sometimes there's NO way of doing that, depending on how fast-and-loose the hard disks and drivers are playing.)     Ah, I forgot that writes were cached by the kernel and then flushed (write calls not being blocked.) That's a pretty big oversight on my problem and makes this a lot easier.
  6. My rationale is that it's a hassle (and inefficient) to call functions via reflection, but you have to use reflection at least once to run code in the script project, since the main project can't reference it directly. So I make a single function that I call with reflection, and have that function do the bulk of the work of "connecting" the script project to the main project. From that point on, the code can call functions "normally" to call functions in the script project. The ways that I "connect" the script project to the main project at runtime are: - The script project can register itself with public events in the main project. When those events get raised, the script project can handle them. - The script project can instantiate classes and then register those classes with the main project. This might mean creating some derived factory classes, "manager" objects, "game objects", or whatever else you might think of. - The script project can add itself to a list of objects that get called during the main update loop (this is implied in the previous line).     Thanks. I'll give it a whirl tonight, sounds like it should be fairly smooth. My architecture only needs a few hooks for now -- but this will come in handy as required!
  7. Writing a game and it seems like logging all packets sounds like a good idea in theory but it'll increase I/O load a lot and use a lot more disk space (plus increase filtering times.)   Is logging every packet sent and receive by a client in an authoritative server model good? Does anyone have some stories that show it can be useful?
  8.   Thanks! If the circular reference thing is indeed true, that puts me at ease. I'll make sure it copies to a \Scrips\ folder and have it search there for assemblies to load. That sounds optimal. Right now, I'm thinking of passing stuff in via the constructor (for a skill script, the skill object it will be working with).    What is the rationale for a dediciated init function and what might it contain? Thanks!
  9. I'm working with C#, as noted by the prefix.   I've got a game server project with some scripting class interfaces in one project and some 'scripts' which inherit from this, over-riding some hooks that the game engine invokes on the base class when required.   My issue comes into parsing these scripts. Since the script project references the game server, the server cannot reference the script project (circular reference.) Since I can't load the assembly in with reflection (easily?) that I can think of, how else can I parse this scripts project and get them inside my game? I guess I could load the assembly somehow but that's got to be bad considering the circular reference window.   I'm doing the scripts as a project with a reference to get IntelliSense while developing them.   I'm open to changing the way they're created and imported. How is this usually done?
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