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Mayrel

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  1. If you include content generated on-the-fly, then the Internet is infinitely large.
  2. Quote:Original post by boolean LMAO! I forgot about that. The reason is: For being not funny. (errr..I take it that it's ok to post that) ... But aren't there quite a lot of people who aren't being funny? And only boolean gets a warning for it... I smell a vendetta.
  3. Scenery: 'Cup' (Side view) (*) -- Sun | | | | | | | | |_____________| Height Map (Represented as the shadow volume) ## ## ##### ########## ########## ############### ############################# ############################# Test ## 1 ## ##### #####2#### ########## ############### ############################# ################3############ 1 is not in shadow, 2 and 3 are. Main flaw: Scenery: 'Blinds' (Side view) | | | (*) | | | | | Has the impossible height map |## | ##| (*) |##########| ##| |## | This is impossible because at some points -- specifically directly behind the blinds, the shadow volume cannot simply be described as a height. The technique works so long as all occluding objects are on the floor. (Or equivalently, all on the ceiling). I presume that your technique is intended for use in exterior scenes. It might be good for things like mountains, buildings and other things that don't float and don't usually move. The problem will be integrating this map with other shadowing systems. If you have objects that aren't glued to the floor, or are mobile, using your technique won't be useful. You'd need to use alternative shadowing mechanisms. What you'll have to determine is whether or not combining several shadowing systems ends up being easier and significantly more efficient than using a single shadowing system.
  4. I wanted to convert a string to uppercase, and I figured I'd do it with transform and toupper: std::transform(string.begin(), string.end(), string.begin(), toupper); Then I thought I'd try to use the C++ version of toupper. So far, I've gotten to: std::transform(string.begin(), string.end(), string.begin(), static_cast<char(std::ctype<char>::*)(char)const> (std::use_facet<std::ctype<char> >(std::locale()).toupper)); But the compiler says error C2475: 'std::ctype<char>::toupper' : forming a pointer-to-member requires explicit use of the address-of operator ('&') and a qualified name. But when I use &, it says it's an illegal operation on bound member function expression. What's going on?
  5. Quote:Original post by LessBread Quote:Original post by Mayrel Socialism and fascism are not the same kind of thing. Socialism is an economic system, whilst fascism is a political system. It is possible to be both fascist and socialist, North Korea being an example. What makes you confident that economics and politics are not conjoined? I disagree that it's possible to be both fascist and socialist. Consider this list of the defining characteristics of fascism: Fourteen Defining Characteristics Of Fascism 1. Powerful and continuing expressions of nationalism. 2. Disdain for the importance of human rights. 3. Identification of enemies/scapegoats as a unifying cause. 4. The supremacy of the military/avid militarism. 5. Rampant sexism. 6. A controlled mass media. 7. Obsession with national security. 8. Religion and ruling elite tied together. 9. Power of corporations protected. 10. Power of labor suppressed or eliminated. 11. Disdain and suppression of intellectuals and the arts. 12. Obsession with crime and punishment. 13. Rampant cronyism and corruption. 14. Fraudulent elections. Some of these are compatible with socialism, but not all of them. I think it's worth asking of a system that exhibits these characteristics whether that system should continued to be called socialist or whether that pretense is better dropped. Which ones aren't compatible with socialism? I only see one, number 9. Are you therefore saying that if each and every one of these points isn't satisfied, the result cannot be called fascism? What if there were no elections? Surely they couldn't be fraudulent, if they don't exist? What if sexism didn't happen to be rampant? Surely the reason that fascism supports the corporation is to gain control over it, because they wish to gain control over all aspects of the state. So wouldn't point 9 just not apply if there weren't any corporations. Quote: Quote:Original post by Mayrel The problem with communism and socialism are their instability. Capitalism has the right balance between centralisation and distribution of power, or if it does not, will naturally adjust to achieve that balance. Naturally? How so? Is there some "natural law" that predicts this? As I pointed out in the part of my post that you didn't include in your quoting, the redundancy inherent in capitalism means that even if individual organisations fail, the economic system as a whole will not. Quote: An imbalance in the distribution of power in a capitalist system - the more common example being the concentration of power in the hands of a few - is the essence of fascism. Your point being? That fascism and capitalism is a possible combination? But I never said it wasn't. Quote: Quote:Original post by Mayrel The problem with socialism specifically is that unlike capitalism, if the government decides to become a dictatorship there isn't anyone with the power and organisational abilities to prevent them from doing so. That's why socialism and right-wing forms of government are commonly seen together: not because socialism causes fascism, but because it does not prevent it. It seems to me that most fascist governments have been capitalist, not socialist. Hitler, Mussolini, Franco, Pinochet etc. They were all very anti-socialist. So what? My point in this paragraph wasn't that fascism and socialism are synonmous. My point was that socialism can make it easier for far right-wing governments to take control. How many socialist states can you name that haven't developed many of the characteristics of fascism? It seems to me that nationalism, human-rights violations, rigged ineffective or asbent elections, and widespread corruption are present in most present-day socialist states.
  6. Socialism and fascism are not the same kind of thing. Socialism is an economic system, whilst fascism is a political system. It is possible to be both fascist and socialist, North Korea being an example. The problem with communism and socialism are their instability. Capitalism has the right balance between centralisation and distribution of power, or if it does not, will naturally adjust to achieve that balance. State socialism assumes that the government is able to (1) obtain precise information on the current state of the economy and (2) predict the future state of the economy from that. Neither of these are true. Capitalism works because although individual agents in the system can't do either those things, half of them can get their predictions wrong without the economy collapsing, because there is a high degree of redundancy. The problem with socialism specifically is that unlike capitalism, if the government decides to become a dictatorship there isn't anyone with the power and organisational abilities to prevent them from doing so. That's why socialism and right-wing forms of government are commonly seen together: not because socialism causes fascism, but because it does not prevent it.
  7. The Living City At the beginning of the 3rd millenium, mankind had already begun experiment with bioengineering. At first, his discoveries were limited to medical and military advances. Later develops like cheap synthetic oil were essential to the development of the modern world, but it was not until five hundred years later that mankind truly began to comprehend the shear scope of his powers. In times of peace, the city is a vision of heaven. The streets and buildings are always in perfect condition. In every park vibrant green grass is carpeted under groves of trees bearing unexhaustible fruits of every taste and texture. The city's antibodies fill the air, preventing infection and illness in all its citizens. In times of war, the city is a vision of hell. Many of the people are unfed and homeless, their former houses lay rotting, streams of putrid cityflesh pours down the streets, spreading strange and terrible diseases. Those who protest are quickly suppressed by the city's usually unseen force of biorobots. Resource usage: Sunlight. Pollution: Pollution accumulates whilst the city feels threatened. Clears quickly when it is happy. Crime: Very low. Happiness: Continually lowers whilst the city feels threatended, very high otherwise. Population growth: No special bonus whilst the city is happy above any usual bonus related to the population's happiness level. Penalty during war due to mass execution of dissidents and reckless disregard for the safety of all citizens.
  8. Quote:Original post by TANSTAAFL My two favorite Zombie populations come from Pirates of the Carribean (because they are Zombie PIRATES) No PIRATE would allow himself to become a zombie! Ultimately, zombies are an allegory for society's compulsion for making its members into conforming unthinking sheep with no other goal than to support the status quo by suppression of rebellious free-thinking via subjugation of the self to the herd. That's why zombies don't attack other zombies.
  9. I don't know, I'm afraid. But I wouldn't be surprised if the console didn't support Unicode.
  10. Quote:Original post by Zipster Nice mini-article. However I've got some questions that have been bugging me for a while. TinyXML uses UTF-8 encoding to handle all languages. Now what happens when you want to display the text? Something like cout won't be able to recognize that the data is encoded. I tried changing the locale settings but didn't get any good results. cout will have no problem with that. It's an issue purely for whatever's displaying what cout is given. On my Linux system, I can stuff UTF-8 into cout and it produces the expected output. Quote: So I guess my question in general is, how do you actually display Unicode characters? Either if they're encoded with UTF-8, UTF-16, etc.? It would seem to me you first find the equivalent code point, but then where do you go from there? It looks like, in Windows, you'd probably use MultiByteToWideChar and then use the standard wide character GDI functions. It looks like Windows has direct support for UTF-8 starting from Windows 2000.
  11. There's been at least one color photo. ...Hunting for an URL...
  12. Quote:Original post by Extrarius Quote:Original post by Mayrel [...]Quote: Garbage collection isn't always a good thing. It is why I hate java and C#. If you just program safely in a non-garbage colecting language, then there is nothing to worry about. Hmmmmmmm. Body armor isn't always a good thing. If you just dodge bullets whilst wearing a day-glo orange suit, then there is nothing to worry about.Body armor isn't always a good thing. Wearing plate mail won't stop bullets, and kevlar won't stop knives, and when you're at the grocery store not worrying about either situation you'd just be carrying around dead weight that is slowing you down for no good reason. GC is the same way - one type will solve one set of situations well, another a different set of situations, and just turning it off might be best sometimes. All very true. But don't you rather get the impression that Darobat is opposed to garbage collection even if you have a lot of control over it? In computing, the grocery stores are full of rifle-toting sociopaths. Unless you absolutely know you're great, it's irresponsible to use unsafe language features, at least in important programs.
  13. ... the cheese squeezes you, as they say in Soviet Russia. In all probability, we'll never see the day that...
  14. Quote:Original post by ToohrVyk C++: + the STL, prevents reinventing the wheel every time you need to copy a string or use a linked list etc It doesn't prevent it, it just makes it unnecessary. Plently of people still go ahead and reinvent the wheel anyway. Quote: + fresh language, some flaws of previous languages have been corrected (such as switch case fall-through, explicit conversion of int to bool...) Not everyone thinks fall-through is a flaw. Quote: + Fast! Compared to what? Quote: + garbage-collected. - Lack of control over the GC. Quote: + Direct use of the Windows and DirectX APIs In what sense is this more 'direct' than in C/C++? The C# language itself doesn't contain these APIs, and neither does the CLI. Quote: - although multiplatform, a .NET standard implementation is required for it to run. Mono provides it on Linux and Unix, but esoteric platforms cannot run it. 1. Mono is not a .NET implementation, it is a CLI implementation. .NET includes a lot of features that are not part of the CLI standard. Whilst Mono provides versions of many of these non-CLI components, many others have been plastered with patents and are unlikely to be available in Mono. 2. But that doesn't really matter because you don't need a .NET implementation to run all C# programs, you only need a CLI implementation. And you don't even need that if C# was compiled to native code: it's likely that if future versions of gcc include support for C#, it will, like gcj, support compiling to native code.
  15. Quote:Original post by Darobat ToohrVyk: A few things you said weren't quiiite true. C++ CAN be faster than C#. You can optomize C++ but not C#. Having the ability to optomize will allow you to increase its speed. Let me get this right. You can't optimize C#? Quote: Garbage collection isn't always a good thing. It is why I hate java and C#. If you just program safely in a non-garbage colecting language, then there is nothing to worry about. Hmmmmmmm. Body armor isn't always a good thing. If you just dodge bullets whilst wearing a day-glo orange suit, then there is nothing to worry about.