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Snjarulf

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About Snjarulf

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  1. Snjarulf

    Intelligence is...

    I don´t know if this is right or not, but I tend to think of people as ¨capable¨ or ¨not capable¨.  My uncle has a PH.d and knows how to fix a car.  My brother in law has been working for Telus for the past 30 years, and knows how to fix just about anything.   Both of them are very intelligent and both of them are very capable.  Not only are they very smart, they are very wise, and they know how to get things done.   Pure intelligence is over-rated in my opinion.  I would rather have capable people around me.   Wassail.
  2. Snjarulf

    Sand, sticks and coconuts

    Man, if you thought I was drunk before, now you have an opportunity to see me in reality.  Beck´s is done, and now I have vodka.   You, as people who have the ability to change the world must decide whether you wish to be a part of the solution or part of the problem.   I don´t wish to argue about how education has been dumbed down for the past 50 years.  I don´t wish to argue about college graduates who can´t spell, people who can´t make a simple declarative sentence, people who don´t know the difference between ¨their¨, ¨there¨, and ¨they´re¨.  The one that I hate the most is people who don´t know the difference between ¨loose¨ and ¨lose¨.  The next I hate is people who don´t know the difference between ¨your¨ and ¨you´re¨.   As a game developer, is it your job to educate people?  I don´t think so.  I am wondering, as you create the next best game, whether you will choose to aim at the lowest common denominator, or whether you will aim at a reasonably intelligent audience.  If you want my opinion, I am not sure that there is such a thing anymore.   Does that make me bad to say such a thing?  Nope.  I am just someone looking from the outside toward the inside.  End of rant.  If you want to make a successful game, make sure it is a game that you yourself would like to play.  My opinion only, but you can probably find worse advice.   It does not matter.  If you only wish to make the big bucks, you will make one choice.  If you wish to make a game that has lasting appeal, you will make another.  In the long run, we are all dead and it does not matter.   Wassail.   Edit:  I expect to catch a little hate for this post.  People who cannot write the Queen´s english will no doubt call me a grammar Nazi or something similar.  The point is that these were things that I learned in grade 4 - 6.  If you cannot learn the rules of communication, how can you realistically expect to communicate?  I don´t care what kind of a degree you have, if you are unable to learn the rules of English, if you are unable to express yourself at a basic level, if you can´t spell, it does not matter how brilliant you are.  Man, you have to walk before you can run, and you must crawl before you are able to walk.  I have learned that I cannot take someone seriously who cannot speak or write proper English.  I am not talking about people who are doing English as a second language, I am talking specifically about people whose first language is English and cannot be bothered to learn to write properly.   Does it make any difference?  Nope.  But after the third error in grammar or spelling I think ¨Oh, an idiot¨ and move on.   Wassail.
  3. Snjarulf

    Sand, sticks and coconuts

    @Code Fox:   I also am afraid of the ocean, and even if I had those kind of resources you would not find me on a boat.  That is what I use computers for, to experience things that I would not do in real life.  Maybe that is what it is all about?    Wassail.
  4. Snjarulf

    Sand, sticks and coconuts

    ¨Go home Snjarulf, you’re drunk.¨ L Spiro.   I am sorry it showed so much, but you are telling the truth.  I have 1 bottle of Beck´s left and soon it will be time for sleeping.  Let us look on the bright side.  You are a professional and I am not.     In my dreams I aspire to be someone like you.  You know, professional, powerful, knowledgeable, but I don´t think that is in the books for me this life.  That is fine, I have a pretty happy life anyway.  I am actually surprised that someone like you would even read the stuff that I write.  Anyway, you made the point that it is time for me to stop writing and start listening again.  Thank you for that.   I will try to write only if I don´t have some Beck´s, but good luck with that.  You can teach me how to approach professionalism if you ever feel like it, and I will listen to what you have to say.  In the meantime, how did you know that I was drinking Beck´s tonight?  I thought my writing was pretty coherent.  Aghh, you have pierced me through the heart.   Thank you for reading my stuff, and I will try to be more professional.   Wassail.
  5. Snjarulf

    Sand, sticks and coconuts

    I know I should probably not be continuing the theme, but everytime I think about people who did succeed in a creative enterprise, they did it for themselves.  Am I making any sense?  People who made songs made songs that they themselves liked.  You know, they did not try to copy success, they made songs that they themselves liked, and then became successful because they were being true to themselves.   I have not got the quote handy, but the idea is to be true to your own self and it follows that you will be true to any other.  If you bug me about it I will do the google thing and find the quote, but the idea is to be true to yourself.   Life is not easy, but I think if you are true to yourself then sooner or later you will find some kind of success.  I am looking at things from the outside but I remember that old Cat Stevens´ lyric, ¨I am old, but I am happy¨.   Anyway, I don´t want to bore you, I just like thinking about things.   Wassail.   Edit:   Polonius:    This above all: to thine own self be true,  And it must follow, as the night the day,  Thou canst not then be false to any man.  Farewell, my blessing season this in thee!
  6. Snjarulf

    Sand, sticks and coconuts

    Well, I got all the real world stuff done today and I am enjoying a Beck´s while I think about things.  Let´s do a little thought experiment. To start, let us imagine that you have about 10 million dollars in your savings account, and you have a yacht anchored in some Pacific paradise, and you are on that yacht. My first question is what are you doing?  Are you like most people enjoying the sun and the sand and the warmth?  Or are you like a game developer trying to figure out how to make a game with sand, sticks, and coconuts?  If you are ignoring the pretty girls, the drinks, and the balmy sky to make a game, I personally would think that you have a passion for making games.  One of the things that has been hammered home by reading Gamedev.net is that if you wish to succeed in the business, you must have a passion for making games.  Not playing them, but making them. The next thought that comes to mind is the idea of ¨professionalism¨.  I think that if you wish to be successful in the business, you must be prepared to be a professional and that is that.  I think that is probably easier said than done. Over the course of years, I have found exactly two games that captured my imagination.  The first is a game named ¨Vangers¨ developed by KD Labs, released somewhere around 1998.  The game is available on Steam if you have a linux box.  If you ever want to get your mind stretched a little bit I would really recommend that you check out the game.  I realize that everyone´s taste is different, but if I ever had to pick a game that I thought was absolutely unique, it would be Vangers.  The funny thing is that when I first installed the game I thought ¨oh, I got burned again, spent $20.00 for a game I don´t like¨.  After I played through the fourth or the fifth time I realized that I had found a pretty good game. The second game that captured my imagination was ¨Dragon Age:Origins¨.  A lot of people thought that the combat was too slow, but that never bothered me; the replay value was so high that I ended up doing the entire game four or five times.  And that leads us to the point of this little piece.  My wish for you as a game developer, is that you make a game that will capture the imagination of the people who play your game.  Me personally, I don´t know how to do that, but I know it can be done. I have been blessed.  I might not be a bright light but I have a circle of friends and family that are very capable, talented and creative; I wish you the same or better.  If you decide to do the work to make a game, I hope that it is one which will capture the imagination of your audience. My opinion is that if you try to share the truth in some way that you will be successful.  It does not have to be a big truth, any truth will do.  But, that is a personal opinion and I don´t really know if that is the right path for you, you will have to decide for yourself. Well, if you have read this far, thank you.  I almost have my compiler set properly, but that darn real world stuff keeps intruding on my time to program.  I´m not worried, sooner or later it will all get done. Wassail. Edit:  Let us also remember courage.  In my opinion, it takes great courage to birth something new into the world.  I wish you great courage, and the bravery necessary to be successful.  Be brave, and succeed.
  7. Snjarulf

    2D game library help

    Since I have been reading a few threads in the beginner´s forum, and since I have not seen any threads with related questions, I am going to assume that each thread is for a specific question.   I wish you much success with SDL2!  Brother, I wish you much success in your journey to be a successful game developer.  Be brave, and do it!   Wassail.
  8. Snjarulf

    Hello

    I am breaking my rule of no posting if I have had a Beck´s, but this has been on my mind today.   I had to do a lot of real world stuff today, but it all got done and I am thankful for that.   Do you know what I think?  I think that you must have a lot of courage to be a game developer, and I think that if you decide to be a successful game developer, you must have even more courage than that.  The internet is not always a kind place, so you must be brave.   For me personally, it is not realistic to hope that I will ever find a place in the industry because of my advanced age and lack of necessary skills;  truth be told, I would not be able to handle it anyway; all those 16 hour days and such are for the young guys.  For me personally, it is also unrealistic to think that I might be able to code the next greatest best game.  I am sorry, but I am simply not that bright a lightbulb.  Everything that I have been reading in the forums seems to say  ¨Game development is not easy.  You must be prepared to spend time, perhaps years if necessary, to make yourself strong in all the areas necessary¨.   That is fine with me, it seems to me that nothing that is worthwhile is ever easy, but the experts also seem to be saying ¨Game development is extremely rewarding¨.  Perhaps not always in a monetary sense, but just being able to make the machine do what you wish it to do I think is a fine thing.   But even someone like me is able to do a labour of love.  I would like to give something back to the community.  If I can do the work necessary to get through those games on the beginner´s list I think I will be a lot stronger in a few areas than I am right now.  I think I have at least 5 years in me, and if I can, I would like to be able to write a module for Linux that gives people some functionality with the CH products.  You know, joystick and throttle and pedals.  Maybe I could write something good, and maybe they could lift the code and use it in their own games without a lot of hassle.    I read gamedev.net and feel inspired.    I wish those people who are developing games in the real world more courage and more bravery.  You are, after all, birthing something into the world that is absolutely new and unique.  I think that the Universe is bountiful and generous and who knows?  You might be the one who makes a greatest hit, and if you do, I think your life will be even more interesting than it is right now.   Me personally, my path is set before me and it is a matter of step-by-step.  My only goal right now is to get through that beginner´s list of games, and if I can do that, then maybe I can think about doing that joystick module.  It is not my intention to bore you.  All I can say is that reading gamedev.net  seems to be pointing toward possibilities, and I am grateful for that.  Thank you for telling me the truth and thank you for being inspiring.  I realize that that is probably not your intention, but it is wonderful to be able to read things from people who are really succeeding in the real world.   Thank you.   Wassail.
  9. Snjarulf

    2D game library help

    I am sorry.  I made this post to ask a question before I remembered that google is my friend.    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/17981834/keeping-sdl2-and-sdl1-2-on-the-same-os   I read the forum faq, but it does not seem to say anything about asking related questions in another person´s thread.  For the future, is it ok to ask related questions in another´s thread, or am I supposed to make a separate thread?   Sorry for the confusion.   Thank you. Wassail.
  10. Snjarulf

    Hello

    Is it against the rules for me to use this thread as sort of a cloud?  It occurs to me that I would like to have a backup somewhere in case I do something that destroys my OS.  If it is against the rules, please let me know and I will find another solution.   I fired up my code::blocks compiler but it couldn´t find my g++.  I did:   aptitude show g++ | grep State:   and it showed not installed so I did:   sudo apt-get install g++   and that seemed to fix the problem with the compiler.   I started a new code::blocks SDL project and managed to get to line 7, where the error returned was: /home/snjarulf/Documents/programs/SDL/main.cpp|7|fatal error: SDL/SDL.h: No such file or directory|   So code::blocks can´t find my .h file, that seems to me to be a path error or something.  I am not sure if I installed the SDL2 stuff correctly, so I did:   snjarulf@Secondary ~ $ apt-cache search libsdl2 snjarulf@Secondary ~ $ aptitude search sdl | grep 2.   I found these commands on the net, but I am not exactly sure what kind of information they are returning.  These two commands returned a lot of stuff but I think SDL2 was still not installed properly because I couldn´t find any of the header files.  Some more fooling around for an hour to two, trying to install a step at a time, still no joy.   Then I found this page:   http://www.squarebitstudios.tk/forum/showthread.php?tid=7 I followed the directions and I think it worked.I am pretty sure I installed correctly because I have my SDL2 .h files on my system now.   I hope all of you had a very merry Yule.   Wassail. -Snjarulf   p.s.  Thank you for your patience.  :)  I think I am going to continue this thread only until I can put a window on my screen from a program in Code::blocks using SDL2, and I am almost there.  I did manage to follow some directions and put a window onscreen by using the command line to compile it.  Going through the process has clarified my thinking.    I am weak in Linux, weak in c++, weak in object oriented programming, weak in Code::blocks, and weak in using SDL2 (or any other library).  I have a lot of areas that I can improve myself, and so far, it has been a lot of fun.  Thank you for inspiring me.
  11. Snjarulf

    Hello

    I am sorry I cannot make an interesting thread, but I come from a culture of ¨rtfm¨.  Before I waste the time of the experts with questions, I must have exhausted all the possibilities that I can think of.  I am sorry, I do not wish to waste anyone´s time, and that is why I put this thread in the lounge instead of the beginner´s forum. Wassail.  
  12. Snjarulf

    Hello

    Hello Misantes.  Thank you for your kind words and good wishes. You know what?  You guys are inspiring.  The way it seems to be working is that I read a little bit on gamedev.net and then I get a little bit more motivated or make a little bit more steam.  Maybe someday there will be enough pressure for me to actually get to it. For other beginners: Today, I found some source for pong that looks doable.  It does not seem to be using any OOP, but that is ok because I am very weak on object oriented programming right now: http://codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/42823/pong-game-written-in-c-and-using-sdl-2-0 And here is a link to SDL: https://www.libsdl.org/   And here is a link to some tutorials:   http://lazyfoo.net/tutorials/SDL/index.php Maybe gamedev.net has some sort of magic.  It seems that all I have to do is read a bit of what you guys have to say, and then another step presents itself.  For someone like me, it is wonderful to have found a source of motivation. I think it will really help during the tough times.  It seems that all I have to do is read a bit on the site and then things take care of themselves.  Magic.  That´s great!  My intention is to visit gamedev.net every day, and see where it leads. The adventure continues... Wassail.   edit:  Some more stuff for other beginners:    Today I found that the SDL libraries are already installed on my system, and when I invoked Code::Blocks it has a choice for SDL projects.  SDL tutorial #7 shows how to use the ttf extension, so once I get past that my compiler should have everything needed to work with the pong code.  See?  The steps seem to be laid out before me.  I added this particular edit because I want to mention LinuxMint.  If you are thinking about dabbling in Linux, or just want to get out of windows for awhile, I think LinuxMint is a very good choice.  It pretty much works right out of the box, it is easy to install, and you can run it from a disk in windows if you just want to check it out without damaging the windows OS. The desktop is very similar to xp.   Installing new software is relatively easy and you don´t need any arcane Linux knowledge to do most common activities.  It is free to download and check out, and if you decide to use it as your operating system it is easy to make a donation to the project.  You know, just to keep things balanced.    On the negative side, if you use your windows machine for gaming as I used to and switch to Linux, things like your MMO mouse, CH joystick, throttle and pedals and Logitech G35 headphones probably won´t work with full functionality in Linux without a lot of programming on your part.  Those things seem to be made with only windows in mind.   Wassail.
  13. Snjarulf

    Hello

    Hello braindigitalis.  Thank you for your kind words and good wishes.   If I can get a Pong clone going on this system, for me personally that will be amazing and a milestone.  I really am a beginner as far as being able to use graphics and such.   For my Pong clone I think I will have to learn how to create a graphic window on my Linux desktop.  I have no clue about how to do that today, but I am sure the information is available somewhere.  Then I must learn to draw some boxes and some numbers.  Then, I must learn to make the paddles and the ball move properly.  I know those kinds of simple tasks are easy for veteran programmers, but I am a beginner and to get things working properly on my system is going to require much learning on my part. At the same time, I must learn to properly use my compiler, you know, get a handle on its errors and its linker errors and its ¨gotcha´s¨.  It will be good practice, and I have google to help me.   I will be writing in Linux, for the Linux desktop, and that is it.  Bill Gates has gotten enough of my money and I don´t think he needs any more of it.  I will not be going back to windows.  I admit that there were a couple of times this past year that I was tempted to re-install win7 on my other computer just to be able to play one of my windows games, but I managed to resist the temptation. My plan is to think about it for awhile, and read all I can in the meantime.  Eventually, I will lift some code from some kind soul who has published his source and see if I can get it running on my system.  If that happens then it is a matter of stepping through every single line to try and figure out what he has done, and why he did it that way.  I don´t consider it cheating to read other people´s code, life is short and I only have so much time left.  Or maybe I should say, ¨I have all the time there is¨. The final test will be to delete all the teaching code and then to write the program from scratch without having to peek at the code that I already know works.  If I can do that, even if it is mostly because I memorized the good code, I am going to count it as almost done. If I comprehend things properly, I think I am allowed to post code in the beginner´s forum for review, so the next to last step is to post there and perhaps you experts will point me toward best practices or give me hints about how and why to make the code better.  I am here to learn.  One or more rewrites to incorporate the new knowledge and to prove that I comprehend what you have told me, a little polishing and I am done.   Then it is on to the next game in the list, it is called worm I think, and a repeat of the process.  I expect in some ways that the second game will be easier, because I will already know how to make a graphics window, but that game will be still be tough too, because I will be learning new concepts for that one as well.  And so the process continues till I finish the final game in the list. And then?  Maybe then it will be time to see if I want to continue; maybe learn some 3d stuff, or modelling, or how to use an engine, or how to animate, or something like that.  I really have no clue at this point, that is a long time in the future.  How long will it take?  I have no idea, but I am pretty sure it is going to take longer than I estimate right now.  I wish I could wave a wand or drink a magical potion and be a strong coder, but I don´t think it works that way.  One thing that I do think I know is that the foundations are important.  If I become impatient and skimp on the core concepts, sooner or later it will cause problems and I will have to go back and re-learn the concepts that I missed anyway. Am I crazy?  I don´t know.  From here right now it seems to be an enormous task to undertake, with little hope of reward.  But it might be fun.  I like coding and I like games.  Perhaps this path is a way to meld the two.  I remember how gratified I used to feel when a tough section of code finally started working properly and how I used to rush home after work to get to my computer when I had a program going.   This may sound kind of silly to you, but in a way, I think coding is just like gaming.  I have an interesting problem and hopefully, lots of ways to try that might work to solve the problem.  Is that really so very different from trying to figure out how to keep my 2 hand warrior alive long enough to get some stats, so he can eventually kill the Archdemon?    Maybe it is a bit of a reach, but both processes seem similar to me. I am sorry for writing so much, I know you guys are busy; I know that a beginner´s thoughts and insights are not really very interesting, but these past few days I have felt more alive than in a very long time, as if I am starting a great adventure or something and I like the feeling.  Maybe to hang onto it I can learn a little bit about something new every day now, then practice what I have learned; maybe that will do it.   Today I learned how to invoke python on my system.  I can´t do anything with it yet and I don´t have an ide for it, but I can invoke it and exit it and a step is a step.  Perhaps that indicates something about my learning curve. Anyway, thank you for reading.  If I ever get my Pong clone working I will post the code in the beginner´s forum, but I will probably not post any more until then.  Thanks again.  I wish all of you much success in your ventures. Wassail.
  14. Snjarulf

    Hello

    Hello.   I have been reading the forums and articles on gamedev.net for the past couple of days, and I would like to say thank you to the members for making this such a great site.  Thank you. First, you have convinced me that the way to reach the goal of creating a game is to start small and build on success.  I found this article especially helpful:  http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/your-first-step-to-game-development-starts-here-r2976 because the author points out the concepts that will be learned by coding & completing each game. Second, in my opinion, people here are telling the truth.  Making games is not easy (at least I do not think it is easy); I especially liked those articles that talk about making a commitment to learn something new each day.  When I think about the learning curve that I have before me, I shudder.  I see a mountain - but ultimately one that I might be able to climb - given enough time, or enough vodka, or enough Beck´s. I´m joking, I´m joking, about the vodka and the Beck´s, but not about the steep learning curve.  I don´t handle frustration any better than anyone else, but knowing that it is a necessary part of the process helps a bit, and having the internet as a resource helps even more.  I still think it is going to be a long road, but that is just paying dues to reach a place where I think I might like to be. Third, for some reason I find this site to be inspirational.  Truth be told, I am kind of a dreamer, but reading about what real developers have to say about the business of crafting games suggests ... possibilities.   The future is fluid in my opinion; the Universe is bountiful and generous,and who knows what may happen on the journey? A bit about me: I consider myself a good solid beginner.  I learned to program in basic, then 6809 assembly language on a 32k color computer.  At the time, I was unsure if I even had the capacity to be able to program at all, something like today, but I learned to take things one step at a time and see where it led.  Later on, when I could afford to, I got a pc clone; then later, when I could afford to, I got myself a quick basic compiler and a c compiler and an 8086 macro assembler, all Microsoft products.  I wrote a text editor in all three languages and had a lot of fun doing so.  As well, I wrote a couple of programs for dealing with markets including some chart programs.  But that was almost 20 years ago! When windows 95 became available, alas, I lost my urge to continue programming.  I don´t understand exactly why or how it happened but I lost the urge to continue programming in that system.  Perhaps it was the steep learning curve or perhaps it was something else, but about 1995 I became a gamer rather than a coder, for awhile.  In those days, I did not have a connection to the net, so if I wanted to learn something I had to buy a book, perhaps that might have had something to do with it.   During the time that I was gaming, I found two games that captured my imagination and a few more that were extremely fun to play.  Out of a hundred windows games in my Steam account, there are less than ten that I think have long term replayability.  I might not know how to write a great game, but I think I can recognize - at least for myself - when someone else has done everything correctly and made a classic.  I mention this because I have been told that making a game is nothing like playing a game and I believe that to be true.  But if I am going to do all the work that is necessary to make a game, I would like to aim at the best target possible.  Does that make any sense?       Fast forward to 2013 when I removed the last copy of windows from my computers and moved into the Linux world; it is the best move I ever made.  Everything changed for the better.  Good-bye to my windows games on Steam which is kind of wasteful, but if I had the decision to do over again, I would not hesitate for a second.  I don´t know why.  Let´s just say that the vibes are different in Linux and leave it at that. And guess what?  I can hear my c++ compiler ¨calling¨ to me again.    It has been a long time since that has happened. As I move into my 60´s it occurs to me that programming a bit, learning a little bit of something new every day might be a way to keep my mind sharp.  Hopefully I have at least 5 years or more to go and perhaps during that time I might be able to learn what I need to know to make an interesting little game.  I approach learning as a case of ¨make sure I know enough to make sure my stuff works properly¨, and then I move on from there.  I am not an elegant coder, that is for sure, but my programs usually work the way that they are supposed to.  Perhaps that is good enough, at least to begin, and if I apply myself maybe one day I too can write elegant code. My plan is to continue reading gamedev.net.  Maybe eventually some threshold will be crossed and I can start doing projects again, one step at a time.  That would be great if it happens, and in the meantime I suppose I can keep making steam until the pressure is enough to actually get down to it and do something.   Enough about me. If you have read this far, thank you.  I doubt that any of you wake up each day and say ¨Today, I am going to inspire someone¨.  But being able to read what real world game developers have to say about things is uplifting, that has been my experience.  I guess that is about it.  I just wanted to introduce myself a bit and say thank you for a great site.   If things progress as I expect them to, sooner or later I am going to have to try my hand at making my version of Pong.  Hopefully without the need for too much vodka, or too many Beck´s. Wassail.  
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