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Envy123

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About Envy123

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  1. I have tried to research an answer to this question but Google comes out nada. I am in a position where I can fund my indie game, instead of relying on rev-share work. However, my sound designer is on a revenue-share basis but I do love his sound design, and I want to start paying him for his work. The problem is - I have changed my indie game from a platformer to an RPG, so the existing sound effects that he made wouldn't be used. Is it possible to move such an arrangement, and has it been done before?
  2.   Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, though have had to deal with this particular issue.   Short answer is No. The law of "soundalike music" does not apply to sound effects. Music has 2 copyrights: the music itself (abstract notes on a page) and the actual recording.  The IP protection for a sound effect is usually limited to the actual recording of the sound. There are a few cases where sounds have also been Trademarked. (one example is Lucas trademarked Vader's breathing sound:    If the sound hasn't been trademarked, then you are free to re-create it from scratch. Note, that if it were fairly iconic, I would make sure that you had a full accounting for the assets and process used to create it, to show that the actual sound recording was not used.    As long as your sound designer truly created the sound from scratch, you should be ok from a copyright perspective. For this sound, I'd mention the concern and ask the sound designer to provide a list of the raw assets used to create the sound in case the issue ever comes up.   (Note that on an aesthetic level, I'd be worried that a sound from your game evokes a memory/emotion from a different game, and would ask for the sound to be redone for that reason, but that's a whole different issue).     Important note: if the sound effect itself can be represented in musical notation (for example, a 5-note fanfare plays when you pick up a gem), then music copyright may come into play, in which case you may NOT re-create the sfx (because it's actually music).     Thank you. :) The original sound effect is a generic bling sound, so that is what I was striving for.
  3. When some players have playtested my game, they were concerned about the gem collecting sound effect and were convinced I simply ripped the sound effect from Spyro 2. However, the truth is that I hired a sound designer to make a soundalike sound effect from scratch.   Is this bound to get me in legal trouble? Does the law of soundalike music also apply to sound effects?
  4.   Thank you, that was really helpful.   I know my game won't have DLC because the DLC model isn't really suitable for my sort of game, so I think I'll follow that studio's footsteps and say the same in my marketing.
  5. *fries, not fires. ;)   Regarding business logic, I've seen one studio say in their marketing that their game will have 2 parts but no sequels or DLC...ever. It seems to have worked and made me more excited for the game for some reason.   Is it really a good idea to say it straight away to consumers or say that there will not be a sequel much later?
  6. Envy123

    Looking For New Direction

      I can critique it for you, if you give me a copy. Chapter by chapter analysis from a cynical young fart, for a limited time only. ;)
  7. Envy123

    Looking For New Direction

        Yep. Thank you Envy. I will public first book. The only one was translated. It took much time and money to translate it.   Of course game story line is a different from book. I changed and added many things. But it going fast and easy. I already have Universe with lands, seas, creatures, countries and events. To make game story on it base - real fan. ;)   Also, a book can give you more freedom in writing and you're not constrained by art assets. In your case, fantasy can sell pretty well as a book with the correct marketing.   I guess my case is unique where I think my game version will sell more than the book could ever sell, realistically.   Its gameplay can appeal to a lot of players and is very GIF friendly, while the story by itself may not pass Richard & Judy's stringent requirements if it was a book (and it pretty much has to, if it's going to be a best-seller).     Yes. Agree. No one from great fantasy novels of our generation which was filmed had no one good game. Except Witcher indeed. But personally I never head about it before playing first part. So only book will not be a problem. :) May I ask you what is Richard & Judy's stringent requirements? I'd suggest to look at their book recommendations and cross reference what good and bad things they say about each one. But in a nutshell, it has to have literary themes and symbolism.
  8. Envy123

    Looking For New Direction

        Yep. Thank you Envy. I will public first book. The only one was translated. It took much time and money to translate it.   Of course game story line is a different from book. I changed and added many things. But it going fast and easy. I already have Universe with lands, seas, creatures, countries and events. To make game story on it base - real fan. ;)     Also, a book can give you more freedom in writing and you're not constrained by art assets. In your case, fantasy can sell pretty well as a book with the correct marketing.   I guess my case is unique where I think my game version will sell more than the book could ever sell, realistically.   Its gameplay can appeal to a lot of players and is very GIF friendly, while the story by itself may not pass Richard & Judy's stringent requirements if it was a book (and it pretty much has to, if it's going to be a best-seller).
  9. Envy123

    Looking For New Direction

    Go and publish them as books first.   A good book does not necessarily translate well into a good video game. You may find that you would need to cut out a lot of the story or even have a brand new story within the same universe to make it into a game which people are willing to pay for.   I have working drafts of a novel and its video game adaptation - and they are 2 completely different stories set in the same universe, because just walking and talking will not appeal to players.
  10. I had my first game as a failure too. The main issue it had was that the gameplay was just average - collect all of the gems in the level and do time trials. Other games do that and more, so why should players favor my game over mine? The art was generic and not really inspiring, either.   Looking at your game:   -The art style burns my eyes. Look at examples from Spyro, Crash Bandicoot or some of the other games which were mentioned further up in the thread. That alone makes me say no. -No plot development from what I can see. Spyro has a reason why he rescues the dragons in the first game - there is a conflict which is resolved in the final part of the game. Here, we just have a Bitle being greedy for Bitcoins and that's around it. -The titles (e.g. Vote for Us) look unnecessarily childish. -There's a stigma of porting mobile games to the PC and putting it on Steam. Just because a mobile game is good, it doesn't necessarily mean that it would be good as a PC title -As others have said, I'm not a fan of earning bitcoins but to play a great game after a long day.
  11.   I combine early access and episodic, and the amount of feedback I got was nothing short of great.   But the early access demo should stand up well on its own and only advertise its current features, not the promise to add new features. Early Access had too many games which were Greenlit based on promises alone and then the developer vanished, leaving them with a half-finished product.
  12. Not necessarily true. Define success. Is success millions of dollars profit and the best game since sliced bread or is success any profit at all? Aim small, invest little and create small games at first so the risk to your business is low. If it even makes a profit after its costs it's then a success so yes, your first game is then a success. Playing the lottery however you can only weight the game so much by buying more tickets. No comparison! Smart businessmen plan to succeed. "Failing to plan is planning to fail"...     I mean success as "making a profit taking into account opportunity costs". If we take into account pure accounting profit, then I agree with you. But I like to take into account what wages I forgo when making an indie game.   I do admit that the lottery analogy was maybe not the best - I was trying to say that there's always an element of luck involved.
  13. To add to the different possibilities, you can have several false starts on the same game.   My first attempt was a flop financially but I managed to finish a game and learn from my mistakes. I know that the game isn't bad, just average (was told this by members on my team).   My second attempt is going slow and steady with building a following and developing the game. Even with hitting the market several times and having a short feedback loop, there is still a chance for it to be a commercial failure because (among other factors) my name is not known in the gaming community right now.   It's not impossible to have a successful first game - you can minimise risk by building a community early in development but the probability is never zero. However, the probability of having a successful first project is about the same as winning the lottery.
  14. Envy123

    Free or low-cost resources that have helped you

    Unreal Engine 4 for the engine, Unreal Marketplace for the assets and Mixamo for the characters (I had to really heavily tweak them to get to my vision though :().
  15. Envy123

    i keep buying games and they're not what i expected

      I only watched snippets of the Lets Play to make an informed decision on purchasing the game - I don't know the story of Undertale all that well, just wanted to see if the gameplay appealed to me.
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