Spidi

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  1. Making games is no fun for me?

    Hi Finalspace! This is a really difficult question to answer, but I have a recent story to tell which may help you (about a similar situation). I have a friend who wanted to work in games for a really long while now. He works as a software engineer so he always had a good basis to easily enter the game industry. He also lives kind-of nearby two small but interesting studios. Once, he tried to apply to one of them. The studio turned him down, saying, that he does not have much game programing related experience. They told him, to finish a small project just to be more fluent in the topic and re-apply. He was one part sad, but one part happy, because he saw a concrete goal. His "dream job" was in actual reach, he told me. At this point I stepped in and tried helping him out with my experiences on how to go about finishing a project, giving him some advice and tips how to approach it, asking about his project every few days and trying to motivate him, stuff like that. By actually trying to finish a game from start to finish he realized he is not that interested in the topic. By going through all the parts of a game (or a software), he soon realized, that actually making or finishing something does not motivate him at all. He "just" likes programming and working on interesting problems. And from that point of view whether it is a game or any other software on which he works on does not make that big of a difference... I think this is cool. I mean some likes to work on games and some people actually like the technical/engineering challenge and not the actual end product or what it will be / how it is used by customers. My friend who I talked about never finished this tiny prototype program (it was indeed tiny, not much more complex than a pong game only a week or two full-time work maximum) and stopped looking for game programmer jobs. He learned something about game development (he probably romanticized it in his head before) and he learned something about himself. That is why I think this was a cool experience / experiment. By this I'm NOT suggesting you to stop working on games, hell no. I'm just saying, that maybe you are a guy who thinks, that he wants to make games, but in reality you are not. You may still work on game engines or game middleware, tools etc... because you enjoy the technical challenges especially the requirements provided by games, but you may not be really interested in making a game. There is a huge difference in making an engine and making a game and I'm not talking about the "you should make games" advice, but about the difference in the daily work that goes into making a game and making an engine/middleware. I suggest you think about this. I don't think motivation is something you "fight for". I think it is something you either have towards achieving a goal or you don't. I guess you could force yourself or artificially "create" motivation (e.g.: deposit some money somewhere which you can only access if you reach your end goal ... could work! ), if you really want to prove yourself, that you can do it, but than what ? I don't know if it would work out well or if it would make you happy. Just my 2 cents...
  2. C# + AS3 + C++?

    They use .net + C#/IronPython + WPF for their frostbite editor, so almost all the authoring tools (level editors, content editors etc...) are written in C# + Python running on top of .net and WPF is their windowing library of choice. Here is a cool vid/presentation about it: Frostbite: Implementing a Scripting Solution for Your Editor (Youtube, GDC) About AS* script: as Kylotan said so, Scaleform is/was a standard UI tool for games. As I know there is/was a fully fledged unreal engine (both for v3 and I think one probably exists for v4) integration and was the UI tool choice for many developers using unreal engine 3(/4?). EA before starting to push frostbite as an internal engine for all their bigger studios was using unreal engine for various projects. Jemme ninja !
  3. I Am Overburdened, it’s alive!

    Wow, thanks! I really hope it will be to your liking ! Wesnoth is sweet stuff. If I recall correctly it is more strategy than rogue though. Thanks again. Cheers!
  4. Soul of Mask

    No biggie, just been around gamedev this morning, checked it and I wrote down my first impression (the pictures look good) .
  5. Reinventing the wheel

    The developers wasn't talking about this point in particular (the way I see it at least). If you look at their product, their milestones and plans (the three Witcher games building on top of each-other in every aspect) you'll see what they are going for. They had specific goals in mind, specific targets they want to achieve and these targets may not align well with the existing "wheels". If you haven't seen it already check this video out where they show how they approached their dialogue and in-game cinematics (cut-scenes): I think what they are suggesting (and cleverly so), is that for innovation, efficiency etc... something new, something specific is needed. I don't think this is an argument against engines or off-the-shelf libraries, but it is an argument against overgeneralizing and ending up in a trap where stock stuff actually limits creativity, design space and the goals/targets. I think the Witcher games could have been made with various unreal engine version as an example and I think the developers at CD Projekt Red also know that, but at the same time they know (and try to advertise this idea), that with the mentality that you just choose off-the-self things for every single thing can dim the vision too, sort-of like steering the wheels a bit instead of you maybe even at the most important loops on the racetrack. Think about it this way, do you really need to do another platform abstraction layer instead of SDL?! Maybe, but it probably will not yield any better results. But if the question is do you need a new workflow or a piece of tech for a dialog system to make jaw-dropping scenes or is it okay to use something stock from the unity asset store. Maybe it is okay to use stock, but if your target is state of the art dialogue scenes without employing 40+ animators and running a mo-cap studio it probably will not yield your target results... So much words for such a simple idea ( sorry for being a blabbermouth ). Don't be afraid of "reinventing the wheel" where you need to. Don't fall into the trap of overgeneralizing (tech) on multiple levels, because it can bite you in the a$$ ... / my 2 cents
  6. Soul of Mask

    Sounds interesting and the looks are really charming / consistent. Keep up the good work and brace yourself for the release .
  7. Released Yes, I Am Overburdened was released at evening (by GMT) on the 2nd of November. It can be bought on Steam and itch.io for 4.99$ and there is a launch-week 20% discount so get it while it’s hot (currently at 3.99$ which may vary based on region)! There is also a tiny extra for my previous customers, call it a “gesture” if you will. On Steam if you bought Operation KREEP before, there is a Magic Item Tech RETRO Bundle to “complete my games” and you get an extra 10% off for I Am Overburdened (sorry itch.io users, I haven’t found a way there to bundle it like this). Really sorry for only posting the announcement here more than a day after the game went live, but I had many difficulties during the release day (and a little even the day after ). If you are interested, more about this here: Thanks for everyone who followed the release calendar, I hope you enjoyed it . No more item reveals sorry, go buy the game, it has much much more artifacts .
  8. Hello there! In the big sprint towards publishing this game I forgot to update my blog with a proper release announcement . I had to split myself in millions to actually finish the game and put it out there, but still, silly me how could I forget . Takeaway: I have to prepare better for my next release, but I heard from other developers, that no time is actually “enough” . Released Yes, I Am Overburdened was released at evening (by GMT) on the 2nd of November. It can be bought on Steam and itch.io for 4.99$ and there is a launch-week 20% discount so get it while it’s hot (currently at 3.99$ which may vary based on region)! There is also a tiny extra for my previous customers, call it a “gesture” if you will. On Steam if you bought Operation KREEP before, there is a Magic Item Tech RETRO Bundle to “complete my games” and you get an extra 10% off for I Am Overburdened (sorry itch.io users, I haven’t found a way there to bundle it like this). First day Now that I’m over the big rush for the release and over the first day, I can slowly ease into handling issues and working on updates, fixes and fine-tunings. The first batch of feedback is really positive and I got decent featuring from the press so far, which is awesome. People seem to understand and like the game, many even praise it and are really enthusiastic about its future . This is an awesome feeling! The game is up to a slow start sales wise but it is too early to draw any kind of conclusions (it’s only been a day). Of course I will do that in a few weeks in another blog entry. Fingers crossed . Thank you! Allow me to grab this opportunity to formally say thank you. Thank you for all who followed the development. Thank you for those who supported, helped and encouraged me along the way. Thank you for everyone who contributed, either with tips, suggestions, testing or critique. And thanks for everyone who already bought the game, I hope you all are having a great time ! I’m adding a new screenshot about the inn in the game (pun intended ), because in the last two weeks of development I changed it a bit (added even more stuff to the game ). Thanks for reading, I’ll be back with more stuff soon. Take care!
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