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ninja_pat

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About ninja_pat

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  1. ninja_pat

    Need help on what to do with my idea

    I Agree wit the posts above. It really depends on what you want to do; the engine is a tool to create what you envision; so whether you will create 2D or 3D depends on teh typc of game; do the mechanics really benefit from 3D or would 2D be sufficient; If you are starting, a 2D (or text-only) game might work; for example, there are a few plugins available now whereby you can create relatively simple branching stories; at each stage, the player gets to make a choice and the story unfolds accordingly. This is rather straight forward and a good place to start. Then, maybe a 2D top view RPG may be interesting for you; in this case u'd still need narratives, but this time asdociated to movement and resource management. In all cases I'd say: start simple and build-up skills/complexity
  2. I would agree with the previous posts. I think the key for you is  to keep going and be motivated to learn more; one simple way to do this is to give yourself little projects to complete, each involving an increasing number of new skills. This means that because they are so small, you will complete them relatively easily and keep motivated. You will also challenge yourself.   Next: maybe you could focus on mechanics and the core of the game rather than graphics; there are professional designers out there and packages available for most of the game art that you need; however, the game mechanics are really your own creation/inspiration. I usually suggest to use simple geometrical shapes like boxes and spheres, and then, when all the mechanics work fine, you can think of replacing them with polished and good looking graphics or 3D models. You could even venture into minimalist games for a while; so you can create great games that don't have to use advanced graphics, but still look polished and include a great game play.   As to Unity, maybe you could try to map-out the skills that you want to learn, and then try to include them in each game (or version) that you create; starting with very simple games and then add some levels of refinement that your new skills can bring.     I hope this helps.   if you want to learn more Unity skills, this blog might be of interest. it includes weekly posts on Unity programming (JavaScript and C#), on several topics, ranging from 3D character creation/animation to simple 2D games or game design tips. You can also, of course, look at Unity's official documentation, and learn new skills there too; but its really a matter of knowing where you want to be and trying to map-out your way to it.   All the best,   - Pat
  3. ninja_pat

    Should I give up?

    I guess the first thing is to listen to your gust feeling and follow your dream.   If creating games is what makes you happy, then follow this dream.   Now, there can be many ways in which you can create or contribute to a game: it does not have to be coding; you could create audio, characters, the game concepts, etc.   The next thing is to meet like-minded people often; find a club or bodies who enjoy creating games, and get together to create something cool.   Las, but not least: be kind to yourself: this is a craft that you will learn steps by steps, and failing is part of the learning process. You will fail..that's inevitable but also part of the learning process. What makes a difference is what you learn from it and that you keep going.   So, I hope this helps.   - Pat
  4. ninja_pat

    For beginners

    Game engines might be your best best; use one that only employs drag n drop first, and then, once u understand the logical structure, you could move to light scripting (e.g., JavaScript).   Game Maker sounds like a good start.   Unity is great, as u can do both 2D and 3D with it through JavaScript or C#   Best of luck!   - Pat
  5. ninja_pat

    Game Development Resources

    Hi,   To get started, you may look into just using drag'n'drop features, just to understand how things work in general, and then see how adding coding helps you to customize and improve your game.   I think using a game engine may be a good start; however, some of them, because they include so many options can be a bit intimidating.   Game Maker is a good start; Unity is great, but can be intimidating at the start too.   For the first one, you can create a game with no prior coding experience, and you get to use programming structures (loops, variables, etc) just with drag and drop (no coding); so it may be a good start. After that, if you'd like to create some 3D content, you could start with Unity and a bit of Javascript, and possibly then move to C#.   To get started with game Maker, you may try this link (simple tut create pacman game):   To get started with Unity, there is a free book here that gets you started with the interface (no programming); You can then look at other books then to get you into programming after being comfortable with the interface here, for example).   There are of course plenty of official tutorials from Unity that you can also look at here.   if you are looking for resources, both Game Maker and Unity give access to plenty of assets. For Game Maker, you may look into their forums; for Unity, there is the Assets store, where you can find free models and other  assets that you can then use in your game.   As you start with game engines, the most important thing in my view, is to set yourself some goals, even small, try to create a small game, and then try to add features as you go along, and challenge yourself. You may use existing assets at the start, and, if you feel up to it, create your own then.   Hope this helps,     - Pat
  6. Hi there, When I was starting game dev, I was looking for a concrete, yet in-depth article that would get me to understand how algebra could be applied to game development. I used to find theoretical pieces that would not really get me to understand the why or purpose of the theory, or pieces of code that worked wonderfully, but had little explanations to justify the code and explain the underlying concepts in depth. I found, reading several forums, that many beginners would face the same issues. This is the reason why I have started to work on a tutorial that does both: a video tutorial that explains a worked example of how maths can be applied to basic AI, in addition to an in-depth explanation of the underlying Maths (e.g, vectors, Euclidian distance, left- and right-handed coordinate systems, dot products, etc.). I wished this kind of tutorial had been available at the the time I was starting game dev, and I hope it will be helpful to some of you guys. The worked example is based on Unity, but the concepts explained can be applied to other platforms easily. The link is: http://learntocreategames.com/solve_you_linear_algebra_headaches_with_unity/ This is the first part of a series of posts on the topic, and I would love to know what other areas/concepts you would like to get to know more. Any feedback/suggestions are welcome. Thanks  
  7. Hi there,   This is my first post on Game Dev.   When I was starting game dev, I was looking for a concrete, yet in-depth article that would get me to understand how algebra could be applied to game development. I used to find theoretical pieces that would not really get me to understand the why or purpose of the theory, or pieces of code that worked wonderfully, but had little explanations to justify the code and explain the underlying concepts in depth. I found, reading several forums, that many beginners whould face the same issues. This is the reason why I have started to work on a tutorial that does both: a video tutorial that explains a worked example of how maths can be applied to basic AI, in addition to an in-depth explanation of the underlying Maths (e.g, vectors, Euclidian distance, left- and right-handed coordinate systems, dot products, etc.). I wished such a tutorial had been available at the the time I was starting game dev, and I hope it will be helpful to some of you guys.   The worked example is based on Unity, but the concepts explained can be applied to other platforms easily.   The link is: http://learntocreategames.com/solve_you_linear_algebra_headaches_with_unity/   This is the first part of a series of posts on teh topic, and I would love to know what other areas/concepts you would like to get to know more.   Any feedback/suggestions are welcome.   Thanks.
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