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shifubear

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About shifubear

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  1. shifubear

    A few questions for Indie devs

    Hey guys!   So I've been wanting to ask a few questions to Indie game developers (Feel free to answer even if you aren't an Indie!), and thought this might be a good opportunity to do so.   1. What do you struggle the most with while working on your projects?   2. What motivates you to continue working on your games, and as an Indie developer?   3. Where do you find inspiration or ideas to start your projects?   4. What do you wish you didn't have to do when developing games?   Thanks in advance and I'll be looking forward to see what you guys say!
  2. Hey guys!   So I've been wanting to ask a few questions to Indie game developers (Feel free to answer even if you aren't an Indie!), and thought this might be a good opportunity to do so.   1. What do you struggle the most with while working on your projects?   2. What motivates you to continue working on your games, and as an Indie developer?   3. Where do you find inspiration or ideas to start your projects?   4. What do you wish you didn't have to do when developing games?   Thanks in advance and I'll be looking forward to see what you guys say!
  3. shifubear

    Beginner asking for advice

      If you ARE looking for lazier options, I would say Game Maker is the way to go. It's probably one of the best ways to get a feel of the game developing process without using too much code. And as SKYe mentioned earlier, it has been around for a while so if you get stuck it is very likely that there will be something out there to help you out. If, after trying this out, you feel like you're enjoying game development and want to do more powerful things, then I would say to move on to more complex tools like Unity. Needless to say, you will have to learn to code in any language eventually so I would say brush up on those C++/Java skills (C# is really similar to these it's like they've been mushed together... well not really but close enough) and just mock up a simple game on Game Maker. I really hope you don't burn yourself out from trying too hard to simulate a game like Zelda. Just start slow, and one day you'll get there. 
  4. shifubear

    New to game development

    Hey Esokaz!    That's great that you're interested in developing games! C++ is used for many many AAA games because of it's history and power, but I would say just don't worry about it too much right now. It's better to slowly get used to the concept of programming and that is something that will come along no matter what language you use.  As for game engines, I hear a lot of people start from Love which is a Lua engine but I think Unity isn't a bad place to begin either. I personally started from using Game Maker and I would recommend that as well if you're into 2D games. Game Maker is nice because you can actually make simple games without scripting at all, so it teaches you about how games are put together I guess. Unity is a bit trickier because it's mainly for 3D graphics, and requires scripting. If you already know Javascript though, you can use that in Unity so that might be nice. Unity also might be better for porting to mobile games, as it supports free cross-platform development. I think you need to pay in Game maker to do that.    Hope it helped!
  5. shifubear

    Cocos2d-x...... :'(

    Thanks for the replies!   -Serapth    I did check out that tutorial and it was one of the best ones I found online, but it ended a bit too early in the process for me. It was great for learning the tools, but what I really wanted to know at the end was how to combine them. In SDL2, it was easy to make the game loop and it was clear where the loop was, which helped me a lot. I heard Cocos2d-x does the looping for me? or something like that, so I don't have direct access to the loop itself. Because of that, I'm really confused as to where and how to implement functions to handle input, actions, collision, etc.. It's great that you're starting a video series though! I'll definitely be checking those out :) Again, thanks for the reply!   -Kenwill    I guess I should look around the wiki a bit more thouroughly. Thank you!    -Desdemian    Thanks for the advice. I guess I might play a bit more with SDL while exploring other options. Gotta work on the fundamentals of the language and game programming first :)    -Glass_knife    I'm not experienced enough to identify myself as one or the other yet, but the reason I started with C++ is because I didn't want the engine to do everything for me. I wanted to know how everything was working, and how a game is put together from a low(?) level perspective. But then again, I'm not used to developing games yet so I'm beginning to think that it might be better for me to use some of those tools to learn how to put a game together while not focusing too much on programming, and then going back to lower level once I'm a bit more accustomed to the process. That being said, I will continue to brush up my programming skills either way. I guess now is a good time to explore the options and see what I like. 
  6. shifubear

    Cocos2d-x...... :'(

    Hey!  I'm a newbie wannabe programmer who started a few months ago with C++, and am slowly beginning to understand a bit about how the language works. I am enjoying programming so far and having a lot of fun tinkering around. I want to eventually be able to develop simple games as a hobby, and have created a few simple simple simple games. I was making text based games, then wanted to learn how to add graphics to the games and tried using SDL2. I enjoyed SDL2, but as my goal in the longer run is to try making games for iOS and android, I thought I should find a tool that would suit those needs. That's when I came across Cocos2d-x. A cross platform C++ tool for game development that's used primarily for mobile game development. Awesome!! I thought. I'm having so much trouble getting started. I can't find good recent tutorials that are made for beginners, and setting up and compiling takes so long.  Is this still a good tool worth continuing to try learning? Are there any good relevant tutorials for Cocos2d-x that are easy for beginners to follow? Is it too early for me to be using Cocos2d-x? Should I switch languages if I want to continue mobile games? I know Objective-C and swift are used more for iOS and some other languages for android. Should I use full game engines like Unity or GameMaker instead? I really like C++ so far, and I want to be able to make simple desktop games too (not the same games as the mobile ones). But I guess I'm willing to make changes too. I'm not in a hurry, and am willing to do what it takes to hone these skills.   Thanks :) 
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