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gerardon

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  1. Dear friends Thank you very much for sharing you insights and for taking the time to discuss this issues with me. Believe, they are very useful. Your comments puts me to think about the complexity of this subject and how should I redefine some issues. When you produce a movie, for instance, then you have all the different specializations in many directions: people specialized in script writing, others in casting, others in sound, light, acting, etc. etc. etc. But you have one character that binds them all: the producer. the one whom coordinates all this complexity. He or she is a generalist, not a specialist. Is somebody that deals with actors, directors, technicians, caterars, financiers, etc etc. That's the character that I want to teach how to do all those processes. In order to do this, he has to know how the process of making a videogame happens, but he/she doesn't needs to be an expert in videodev... Am I wrong thinking this way? Or should throw this all idea away? The experience I have developing software, making videos and being part of a movie's production team, is that there is allways a person that has the overview of all the processes, and has to know in advance the consequences of wrong decisions or delays. Because it has impact on the budget or the sales. A programmer is not necessarely concerned with those problems. He/she has to deliver his component in time, gets paid and his name will be at the end of the movie. And this person has to be very creative in many different ways. But, again, he/she needs to know how a videogame is developed from scratch. I want to thank you all because your comments have helped me to clarify my ideas. Like Tom Sloper said, those kids have to go on the journey and experience what it is to make a videogame, and that's why I still think that a specialization in new media (by the way, I am not thinking only on videogames, but it will include also digital animation, audiovisual and the related disciplines) should combine artistic, technical and managerial contents. Without forgeting the basics: maths, phisycs, history and so on. But, guys, did you see how the Khan Academy teaches maths together with Pixar? Please, take a look at it. Maths, history and so on can also be teached in an amusing and captivating way, like videogames are: https://es.khanacademy.org/about/blog/post/127714217180/pixar-in-a-box-the-math-behind-the-movies And, answering to the friend Joej, I can't peak into the future, but one thing I am sure: future will not be the same as the past. If you remember from history classes, around 18th Century mankind went from the Agricultural Age to the Industrial Age. And that was a hell of a change... Well, there are many thinkers around that agree that we are leaving now the INdustrial Age and entereing into something new, the Knowledge Age, the Digital Age, whatever... fact is that the most demanded jobs now, didn't exist merely 10 - 20 years ago (like what you are doing with gamedev). The smartphone that you have in your pocket now, is only 10-15 years old. And counting. SO, again, my main concern is how do we prepare the next generations for the changes that already are ocurring around us. Having a degree now is not the same as having a degree 15 years ago. We can not keep teaching like the way we were educated. Merely because the world in which the educational system was created, does not exist anymore. Please, look for TED talks of Ken Robinson, like> or I am sorry if I took you off the usual issues that you use to discuss in this forum, but, beleave me, it has been very enlighting for my search. ANd for that I am very thankful to you all. I would love to continue this discussion, guys. Please, send more comments. Bye for now.
  2. OK. Thank you for all the reactions. First of all, my excuses if I sound a bit annoyed, but literally lawnjelly you wrote (I quote) "you are selling a lie" which it sounds to me "you are a lier"... But, indeed, I am a passionate man with many years of educational experience in innovative processes related to arts and cultura (creative industries it's called now) and I beleave that it's time to move on in the issues we are offering to the youngers. Regarding Joej, and thank you for your comment. My perception is that in this early stage of formation it is appropriate to form an all-rounder that can have a 360º view of the industry and later can choose which way to go. For the good understanding: what I am developing is a high-school learning propossal, intended for young people between 15 and 17/18 years old that afterwords will go to the university. They can then choose between enginering, arts, business, whatever. But I want to prepare them offering choices. How I think to achieve this? Because our pedagogy is based on projects and competencies. Already when they are at 1st. grade (ages 6-7) they learn based on projects. We do not have the regular asignatures scheme, but the teachers team integrate all the concepts corresponding to that age into 2-months projects that the children have to accomplish. They are stimulated to do research, and mainly to be the head actors of their own educational process. They do no repeat wor by word what the teacher has to teach, but they make their own choices within the restrains of the curricula, which is by the way approved by the Ministry of Education of Panama. So, thinking forward, the next step is to provide them tools and concepts within the digital animation and videogames industry, where they can apply the way how they learn and solve problems into this amazing industry. It may sound a bit unrealistic, but it depends on which educational perspective you apply. Traditional, asignatures and memoristic schol which we all have done, is outdated. We have to prepare the next generations for the challenges to come. ANd that's my call... So, all this said, what I would like to get advice is on what can be an adequated "journey" for a young person who is interested in entering in this world. As Launjelly said, I am looking here for people with tons of experience developing this industry which I can interview and get advice from the practice. I believe that the people are gathered in this Forum are the ones that make the industry wrok. If you beleave that I am in the wrong place, please, let me know. Thank you for your atention and advice. Cheers
  3. Dear Lawnjelly The last sort of comments I expected to read in a forum of gamedevs is one like yours. First, I find it rather offensive to call me a lier when you have no clue about what the educational program I am developing includes. Second, because I think that you have a very limited understanding of what gamedev means for the cognitive, artistic, sensitive, professional and intelectual development of a younger means. In order to become a good gamedev you have to learn a lot about artistic and creative disicplines: music, 3D design, illustration in many different techniques, drawing, photography, digital animation, creative direction, storytelling, scriptwriting, psychology, 3D modeling, 2D and 3D ANimation, prototyping, modeling with ceramics, video production and edition, vectoring and many other artistic disciplines and techniques which never get outdated, because since the mighty Old Greeks, those are the fundaments of uniersal arts. Not to mention 3D printing, programming in different languages, robotics and similar. Then, you have to learn project management, how to lead a high performance team, finances, administration and, most important, entrepreneurship. Then you have to learn about marketing, sales, branding, networking and, of course, have a deep understanding of how an industry that generates billions of dollars and generates work for thousends of persons all around the world works. And then, of course, comes the understanding of the software, which, I agree with you, becomes obsolete very quick and it's not the main focus of my propossal. Work possibilities for the youngsters? We are in the dawn of the so called Fourth Industrial Revolution, marked by a new relationship between humans and machines, and where AI takes a prominent role. The concepts and techniques used for videogames as entertainment are essential in the new ways people can be educated. We do not need to dissect a human body anymore in order to learn medicine: 3D simulation and interactivity provides all we need to know in order to become excelent doctors... and it applyes for many different activities which are now analogical and will be digitalized. And to dissect a digital human body is, as you may agree with me, a sort of videogame... Last but not least, I would advise you to read about constructivist pedagogy. Then you may understand some of the possibilities that gamedev has in order to adequately prepare the youngers for the new world we are going in. So, Sir, as you see, the world is much wider and richer than the leaflets that you get through your door. Be careful that the 4th Industrial Revolution does not passes through your life without you knowing it. Greetings.
  4. HiI'm a all-rounder innovator with the crazy idea to create a high school for children between 15 and 17 years old. We have already a school for children till 12 y.o. that focusses on developing their creativity. I am loaded with the development of the high school. But I don't know enough about designing videogames to develop a curricula. Are there some people interested in formal education that want to help me with this job? What does a boy or girl that wants to develop their creativity into the videogames world needs to know from scratch? What should the first steps be? how can we form a young game-developer that later can turn to be a professional? Do you know some cases of schools that do this job already? We are settled in Panama (the country). Please, let me know if there are some inspirated educators among you that want to be part of this adventure. Tnx
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