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Wolfebytes

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About Wolfebytes

  • Rank
    Newbie

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  • Role
    Student
  • Interests
    Art
    Design
    Education
    Production
    Programming

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  1. Throughout my game programming courses I've been developing essentially a prototype for the game I ultimately want to make. We have a class in the curriculum that teaches us about the Proof of Concept and how to develop it. I plan to finish the prototype, hopefully within the next few months with a small group of friends. Ok that's great, I have a prototype, I have a proof of concept, what do I do now? What's the best way to get this out there, how do I pitch these two things? What's the classic method for getting these into people's hands, make a meeting with a publisher and see if they'll bite? Is crowdsourcing a better option for a small team? Does it have distinct advantages over the classic method? Are there disadvantages to crowdsourcing that a small team should be aware of? In the PoC you list the game's selling points, do those translate effectively into a crowdsourcing program account? I've seen the power of crowdsourcing, I mean Star Citizen just hit $200M, but I'm no Chris Roberts. For us non-legends of the video game world, what's effective and why?
  2. Wolfebytes

    Aspiring Character Artist looking for advice

    Thank you for the feedback, this is going to be challenging but I'm really determined to make it work.
  3. Wolfebytes

    Aspiring Character Artist looking for advice

    That's really good advice. Do you find it's better to focus on how well you can create a model vs how you create it? There are so many different programs out there, and no job listing ever has the same set listed. Is there a core group of programs that are a must and the rest you pick up as you can/need, or is it better to just choose what you like working with best and focus on that? Does it matter in your portfolio what you used to create the characters?
  4. Wolfebytes

    Aspiring Character Artist looking for advice

    That is exactly the type of advice I was looking for, thank you so much Mr. Sloper!
  5. I am currently an undergrad several months from graduation. My major is in Game Programming and Development. During the course of my studies, we've had a few modeling classes and I really took to it and feel that is the direction I really want to go, specifically I would love to become a character artist. I keep hearing about your portfolio being super important, but I've really never been able to find out what kind of work is best to put into my portfolio. There's no "put 2 of these and 1 of those in," kind of tips. I get that I'll want to put some characters I've modeled in there, but I guess what I really want to know is, if I want my portfolio to be noticed and taken seriously for a character artist position, what is the best way to present it? Since most of my courses have dealt more with programming, I need to build everything for my modeling portfolio on the side, outside of class on my own time. I know there are no specific numbers like: put 3 realistic humans, 2 robots, a creature, and a stylistic character in your portfolio. But as a general rule is there some kind basic guideline or tips for what to make to get your portfolio off to a good start?
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