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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Tron3k

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  1. Wow, this is nostalgia-town. All this needs is for bishop_pass to show up out of nowhere, and we'll be transported back to the early 2000s. [img]http://public.gamedev.net/public/style_emoticons/default/smile.gif[/img] The site is so modern now. I think I preferred the dark theme.
  2. Quote:Original post by Rebooted Quote:Original post by Tron3k There are many minor innovations in Arc. The only radical novelty I've found in it is the extreme simplicity of web code. Read blog.arc and srv.arc to see what I mean. If you've set up Arc, a "Hello World" webapp can be written as follows: (defop hello req (pr "hello world")) (asv)Then navigate to http://localhost:8080/hello.That is a library issue, not a language issue. Graham could have implemented his web app library as a Scheme library, he didn't need a new language.So? He didn't. Maybe he had reasons to make Arc other than as a platform for his closure-based web library. Although it is natural to do so, try not to take my posts as points in an ongoing argument - I don't intend them that way. I just thought that since someone here was interested enough in Arc to create a thread on it, it might add to the thread to have the participation of someone who has actually played with it for a few days. At least I've managed to steer the discussion towards Arc's web features, something the debate had (amazingly) not even acknowledged at the time that I entered the fray. Quote:If you look at his tiny web app challenge here, you'll see many people have posted comparable solutions in other languages, including a Haskell solution which is quite a bit shorter.That's fantastic! Again, my point about the small "Hello World" webapp is not meant to be the opening salvo in some kind of epic battle over the justification of the existence of Arc. I just thought it was neat. Quote:Arc has first-class continuations (call/cc is now called ccc), which is something over core Common Lisp. But Scheme has had them since the 80's. There really is nothing new.I think that the 4000 lines of Arc do contain a few novel ideas. Why not take a look?
  3. Quote:Original post by Washu ... print 'Hello world' <-- Python. Thanks for playing.In Arc, that is (prn "Hello world"). Neither of these act to create a running HTTP server. Quote:Quote:Original post by Tron3k Quote:Original post by Zahlman having irregular, predefined syntax is actually an advantage for human readability in the general (i.e. not domain-specific) caseArc is an experiment in a sort of minimalist philosophy that explicitly eschews readability as a relevant design parameter. It is, at the very least, interesting to watch.Perl.Yes, Perl is a language with a similar philosophy.
  4. Quote:Original post by GnuVince Like many mentioned before, it doesn't bring anything new, except maybe that sequences are callable to make indexing easier. There are many minor innovations in Arc. The only radical novelty I've found in it is the extreme simplicity of web code. Read blog.arc and srv.arc to see what I mean. If you've set up Arc, a "Hello World" webapp can be written as follows: (defop hello req (pr "hello world")) (asv)Then navigate to http://localhost:8080/hello.
  5. Quote:Original post by Zahlman having irregular, predefined syntax is actually an advantage for human readability in the general (i.e. not domain-specific) caseArc is an experiment in a sort of minimalist philosophy that explicitly eschews readability as a relevant design parameter. It is, at the very least, interesting to watch.
  6. Quote:Original post by jpetrie A secret pattern. Within a year or two, the only moderators on the site will have names starting with J! MUAWAHAHAHAHHAHAHHAHAHAAHAAAHAHAHAOk.
  7. Quote:Original post by mtw All that might be necessary is a portrait of him gazing into space with an expression of pondering.On that note, I just found this majestic Rembrandt: Although that guy seems a little too dejected to be Asimov. [smile]
  8. Quote:Original post by mtw Quote:Original post by Tron3k This is actually an interesting commentary. Does the robot detract from the piece? And why? How could it be done better? Remember that much of Asimov's life work focused on robots. It would be better if it didn't try making him look like a titan deity, because that's not what he is. I also don't think symbols are necessary; they're often redundant. All that might be necessary is a portrait of him gazing into space with an expression of pondering.I think the problem is not the use of symbols in itself, but the artist's ham-fisted use of them. Much of the popularity of The Last Supper stems from how it is positively overflowing with symbolism.
  9. Quote:Original post by LessBread That is not a great work of art. That is a hagiographic work of art. Asimov is not a picture of Asimov.Note that I didn't say it was a great work of art. Great art is the premise behind this thread, and I'm not sure if that one is great or not. That's what the discussion is about, you see. Quote:Original post by kevtimc The only thing holding me back from taking the picture seriously is the transformer looking robot engraved to the left of him. :)This is actually an interesting commentary. Does the robot detract from the piece? And why? How could it be done better? Remember that much of Asimov's life work focused on robots. I also thought the E=MC^2 didn't quite fit - I would rather have the 3 laws of robotics there somehow.
  10. Have you ever seen a piece of art that left a distinct impression on you for days afterward? A few days ago I was aimlessly wandering Wikipedia and stumbled upon this fantastic piece: This image is a reproduction of an original painting by renowned science-fiction and fantasy illustrator Rowena. It depicts Dr. Isaac Asimov enthroned with symbols of his life's work. It seems to me that the brilliance of this work is in how he is looking upwards at the sun shining down upon him. It's saying something about the far-reaching vision of the man. I drew a pencil sketch of Asimov a while ago, so seeing something like this reminded me on a personal level of how far I have yet to climb. At this point, it's hard enough for me to get the essentials right, so that the image actually looks like the person I'm drawing. (This is a tricky business, by the way! Sometimes a few short strokes of the pencil can change the picture from that of an anonymous person to a slam-dunk visual representation of your subject. The brain's facial recognizer is a harsh mistress.) I encourage you all to post works that impacted you personally, and we can try to discuss the endlessly debated question of what makes art great. (These may be apropos to this thread: How Art Can Be Good, The Myth of Meritocracy in Fine Arts, and The Unanswerable Question of Art)
  11. Quote:Original post by Flarelocke Quote:Original post by Alpha_ProgDes Quote:Original post by Steadtler Any news if they are EVER going to bring back Battle Programmer Shirase? Who? It's about an absurdly elite programmer, who is probably also a pedophile, and his cyber-fights against a fat, annoying american hacker, and a few other bad guys.Not just any American hacker - he's the KING OF AMERICA!
  12. ^_^
  13. You seem to come so close to understanding it. It's fascinating that you mention deus ex machina, since "God from the Machine" is quite an elegant way to describe the ending of this story. I'm not sure what you're missing. Maybe you didn't understand the moment of revelation at the end? You're supposed to go "whoa", and then walk around in a haze for a couple of hours.
  14. I just got my laptop back from the repair depot today. The last few days without computer have been more productive (in terms of studying, doing homework) than I've ever been. If you're not doing computer work, the best thing to do is to lock your computer in a cupboard.
  15. Quote:Original post by DakeDesu Quote:Original post by LessBread Quote:Original post by DakeDesu Quote:Original post by LessBread Didn't John Candy already try this once and fail?Now that LessBread has appeared, please do not take up old rivalries... THIS IS NOT A POLITICAL THREAD.Buzz off man, that wasn't a political comment but a movie reference. What is a political comment? I do not understand why you are telling me to buzz off. AFAIK what I said was for others to stow old rivalries at the door, now that somebody who is infamous for having strong opinions is now joining in with the fun. And because I let it be known that grudges will not be tolerated, I get told to buzz off? Well take off, ya hoser, eh.Just for your own education and since you seem to think you are in the right, I'd like to point out here that any social problems arising here are entirely due to your incompetence at dealing with people. Improve! You can do it - I did. "Now that LessBread has appeared, please do not take up old rivalries... THIS IS NOT A POLITICAL THREAD." Yeah, that's really not going to piss him off. How wise to post an inflammatory comment in order to prevent a flamewar.