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Doolwind

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  1. Hi guys, After almost 8 years on the forums I've finally gone indie and released my first game. We created an iPad and iPhone game using Unity3D and it's coming out on December 15th. The game is called Flick Buddies and is a 4 player action game designed around simple, multiplayer fun on iOS devices, something we've rarely seen in other games. We'd love it if you could check out the trailer and let us know what you think. I'll post more soon after release including a full review of Unity3D and a postmortem of the 3 month development. Website: http://www.flickbuddies.com Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iP-xvy8prkY Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/flickbuddies Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/flickbuddies
  2. I've had similar problems. In my case, the textures have artefacts on them. Here are a few suggestions: 1. Try making your textures square and a power of 2 in size (128, 256, 512, etc) 2. Try saving your texture out to disc to try and determine if it's the source texture that is having issues or the actual rendering to disc 3. My problem was caused by rendering the render target to the screen at a different size to the render target itself (eg it was a 128x128 render target and I rendered it at 150x150). Doolwind
  3. Quote:Original post by Oluseyi Tragically, most tutorials really, really suck. Flash has moved further and further away from being a "pure" animation tool and more toward games and application development. That said, my recommendation is to grab Adobe's Flash CS<whatever version you buy> Classroom in a Book and use that to get familiar with Flash features. Hopefully your artist has a basic grounding in animation principles. Thanks Oluseyi. Our artist has a great grounding in animation principles, just little flash experience. I'll grab one of those books. Doolwind
  4. Awesome, thanks guys. Flash is within our price range so that looks like our best option. Do you have any recommendations for places to grab tutorials I can give to our artist?
  5. We are looking at our options for creating 2D animations for our current indie game. It's a superhero themed strategy game with units about 120px high that move along the screen somewhat like Plants vs Zombies. My question is, if we want to have an art style similar to Shank what would be the best option. We see two main options: 1. Frame by frame drawn animations 2. "boned" animations created in flash Do any artists out there have recommendations? We would love to do the boned flash animation if we can as it would save us time and money, but are unsure if this has the power to look good for character animations. Any links to tutorials or examples would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Doolwind
  6. I'm a big fan of C#. I've used C++ and C# (along with gamemonkey script) both within the games industry and in business positions. I've played with python and other scripting languages and keep coming back to C#. The main reasons it's so good: 0. Good clean language (interfaces, generics, reflection) 1. No memory management 2. Visual Studio support is awesome (intellisense, debugger) - with free versions available 3. XNA lets you do 2D and 3D later if you're interested Just a quick note. I don't think comparing the "hello world" of each language is really a valid way of comparing them. Sure there is some extra code to get things set up, but other than your first couple of hours in a language this isn't going to make a great deal of difference down the track. Doolwind
  7. Quote:Original post by Winegums Read your blogpost, I REALLY don't think gamers should have any creative input to the product. They're idiots. There are people with great ideas, but their voices would be drowned out in the sea of "lolol make it an mmo where you play as Halo and fight Chuck Norris". I've heard this from a number of people. I agree that this may be quite an issue, however hopefully a minimum investment of say $100 would reduce the issue. Having said that, perhaps the safest option is to make it simply voting rights rather than actual feedback. Doolwind
  8. Hey guys, Valve's Gabe Newell spoke about community funded games the other day. I threw together a blog with my thoughts on it today and wondered what everyone here thought. Doolwind [Edited by - Doolwind on July 31, 2009 4:46:21 AM]
  9. Kylotan- Thanks for the detailed list. I was hoping to be able to add value over pen & paper/photoshop with it's ease of use, but it seems that isn't enough :)
  10. jbadams- Thanks for the feedback. My main aim would be to create something that is easier than pen & paper. One main requirement would be the ability to create a GUI mockup for say an RTS in <5 mins. The main aim over pen & paper would be the ease of moving things around and sharing with people on the net. I would plan to support all the basic UI elements (probably 100 or so for v1.0). In future versions I'd add extra support for collaboration as well as annotated feedback.
  11. Quote:Original post by Ashaman73 Well, a mockup tool doesn't deliver enough new features to be of any interest, but what about a game gui designer ? I would love to see a customizable game gui designer with customizable text/xml support. Thanks for the info Ashaman73. I'm hoping that the tool will be simple enough that it will allow prototyping much quicker than the average paint tool (photoshop, gimp). I'd also look at adding simple interaction design and game specific guides such as screen safe zones for consoles. As for a customizable game gui designer, I guess the issue is what technology to write it in.
  12. I have a few questions for game designers when mocking up their GUI's for a pitch/design document or for quick prototypes of a UI: What do you currently use for mocking up your GUI designs? If there was a tool created specifically for mocking up game GUI's, would you be interested in using it? What core features would you like to see to help you mock up your GUI's? I'm thinking about making a lightweight tool which allows rapid GUI prototyping specifically for games. It would have a set of UI controls (eg minimap, compass, health bar, etc) which you could easily snap together to do rough mockups. Any thoughts? Doolwind
  13. Another great article, thanks for sharing your insights. I think it's worth giving a plug to a friend of mine who came up with a new deferred rendering technique, it may be worth you having a look.
  14. I think you're always going to get people whining and complaining, particularly with gamers. I wouldn't let the words of a few (or one) sway you as I know of at least 4 (including myself) senior level game developers that read every entry of your journal looking forward to the next one. Perhaps it's jealousy from someone that wishes they were as good as you. Most people I know within the games industry wish they could put something out even half as good as the tech we see coming from these pages. Keep up the good work and I think I speak for most people when I say that we're happy to wait "until it's done" for this game. Doolwind --------------------- Development Diary
  15. Thanks for sharing your experience with setting up NLG. I have a very simple comment unrelated to the tech, but more its usage. From previous experience I've found that players would rather have slightly more control over their character than simpling "rolling" for it. The problem is that players will often have a fairly specific style in mind and if the only way of choosing this is through chance/luck then it requires them to keep rolling until they finally get what they want. If you could allow players to determine their actual history (eg set the values on the right hand side in your prototype) then they could tailor their character more easily. You've already spoken about how certain characteristics will have both a negative and positive effect and this should mean there is no "perfect" choice for the character. An example of this is in the way Baldur's Gate/Neverwinter Nights handles character creation. What you are creating is completely different, but the important point is that they used to have rolls determining your stats. This rewarded players who "rerolled" for minutes to hours to get the perfect character they wanted. This has been changed in later games to letting the player allocate their points manually. This allows both more freedom and stops the need for repetition to get a "better" character or one that is closer to what they want. Doolwind