__ODIN__

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About __ODIN__

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  1. iPhone on Microsoft and C++

    While it's entirely possible to do the bulk of your coding in C++, anything touching Apples APIs is in ObjC; you'll end up doing quite a lot of ObjC coding to get proper iphone UIs working, accessing OpenFeint/Game Center, etc. Allan
  2. Video play in backward

    Video streams consists of I frames and P Frames; each I frame is a standalone frame, but each P frame is relative to the frames before it (usually the last P/I frame before it). Since the data's not available, you can't really step backwards; it just doesn't have a P frame for "this frame -1"; you'd need to find the last I frame before it, then reconstruct all the P frames up to the frame you're looking for. That could get.. expensive. Allan
  3. 2D games comercially viable as standalone?

    There definitely needs to be a minimum quality bar if you want people to download and pay for it; for the PC games, that's currently somewhere between 'casual download' (www.bigfishgames.com) and 'hardcore indie' (see IGF or Steam). If you're not competitive with that kind of games, people are unlikely to pay for your product. You COULD look at iphone; it's got an easier purchasing mechanic, and people are more willing to try small games with a cool hook or spin. Allan
  4. Wii Question...

    There're also Wiimote drivers for PC (it connects using bluetooth). You'll not get sensor-bar information without a lot of work, but buttons and accelerometer is pretty trivial in C++ Look at WiiYourself! for an example; we actually used that for our first prototype while waiting for our license and NDEV to arrive. Allan
  5. Wii Question...

    You'd need an NDEV devkit, and Codewarrior for Revolution / Wii SDK; total cost for that's about 2K USD, and you need to be licensed from Nintendo (which is hard enough for experienced professional devcos to do). The good news is that C/C++ is the language of choice, so learning that will only do good things for you. There's also a thriving homebrew community for the Nintendo DS (http://hive.ndshb.com/ is probably a good place to start). Alternatively, the XNA system from MS would allow you to code for a console (XB360), using C#. Good luck, Allan
  6. Best model format for games

    You could look at Collada, which is supported by a lot of commercial digital content tools. You'd still want to post-process it for your final run, though, since it's not the fastest thing to load. If it's a commercial project and you're writing an engine from scratch, I'd take a hard look at Granny3D from RAD tools. . Feature and quality wise it's VERY good. It's got some awkward restrictions, though... on PC the biggest one is that you can't distribute the exporter (which makes it a pain to support a mod community). Allan
  7. Alternatively, try to pick a fight on your own terms. If you're a bad programmer, use a visual or quasi-visual environment for developing your games (Gamemaker or Flash both come recommended), and choose an art-style that doesn't require a lot of innate ability (look at Desktop Tower Defense, for example). You can also get involved in mod-teams doing level design/map design, etc. We actually hired two fresh-graduate designers on the strength of their portfolio of small and intelligent games built in game-maker. Designers play games, and make games. I'd be very hesitant to hire one that had only had lots of documents to his credit (but had never actually gotten his hands dirty implementing anything); it would be a sign that he's a talker, not a doer (Big Ass Design Documents also tends to lead towards complex, content-heavy games, which aren't ideal for small novice indie-teams). If you're a total analexic in terms of all implementation driven aspects, you might want to look at implementing a simple tabletop game (board, card, figure or RPG, for example); that will allow you to showcase your ability to design and balance complex systems without having to code anything. Allan
  8. OGRE

    Have you made sure you've set your DEBUG folder in VC to point to the data directory? Allan
  9. I'd also check out Port Royale 1/2 , which manage the combine the 'patrician' style trading with pirates style micro-management. Allan
  10. project name and domain name conflict

    Quote:Original post by Tom Sloper Your lawyer can help you with that. Don't got lawyer? Get lawyer. Or, before you decide to trade in your kids college fund to feed a poor starving lawyer , you could always just send them a friendly email stating that your position, and pointing out that you're both open-source projects, and that neither of you have money to spare for this kind of nonsense. Now see what you made me do.. I spilled hot coffee on my lap! I figure this must have seriously damage my sperm-quality, and I wish to sue Starbucks for the life-earnings that my 5 Nobel-Prize winning children would have made if it wasn't for them irresponibly selling hot coffee. Plus tort and damages. Anyone have a good tort lawyer contact they'd like to share? Allan (I do actually agree with Tom almost 95% of the time)
  11. The Correct Path?

    Quote:Original post by Tom Sloper Stop with the "fear!" Fear is a life-killer. I have collected many wise sayings about fear in FAQ 47 on my site: http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson47.htm "I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain." --- Frank Herbert, Dune - Bene Gesserit Litany Against Fear I generally advice against courses that try to teach all 3 core game development topics in one (Tech, Art, Design). While it's useful for a game programmer to know the basics of Max (so he at least can model up some gray-box environments), if you split your attention too widely, you'll end up loosing out to purebreeds from either side. They're also orthogonal skillsets, and the ability to be both a good artist, and a good programmer, is damn rare. Tom's right, though; your best bet is to just keep working on this course, and use it as a springboard for the future. You can for example go on to add a MSc in computer science to it if you worry your programming background is too light. As with all things, your ability to self-learn and self-start really is far more important than what the school teaches. Enjoy the time, and the opportunity to work with like-minded students.. and work like hell to make some kick-ass games for your portfolio. Allan
  12. Links 2003 - Golf

    Franchises still have value, and just because the original development studio is gone, the IP guaranteed still belongs to one or other of their owners along the way (it's pretty common to strip out choice IP before selling the studio on). They're unlikely to give it to an untested amateur because you're unlikely to add any benefit to their brand, and are quite likely to fluff it up; they want to retain the option of going back and reviving the brand sometime later (which happens regularly) On the happier side, all that really stops you from making a golf game with the same FEEL as Links is your own skill and dedication. You can't CALL it Links, and you have to be careful about brands in the game (so no Tiger Woods teeing off beside you), but if you make a game called Golfer's Paradise game with similar gameplay, you're fine. As an added bonus, you don't need to spend the remainder off your life with T2's lawyers breathing down your back. Allan
  13. How do I get missiles to follow a curve?

    You're looking for a simple steering routine, I suspect. The basic idea is that you have a Speed (vec2) and a current rotation (float). Each frame you apply a force (Vec2 Acceleration) along the axis of the rocket (so it can only accelerate straight forward), and rotate the rocket a little to align it with the target (either by using a dot-product, or by calculating the actual angle with atan2). That'll curve it the way you want. Allan
  14. Phun - a 2D physics playground

    Tried with the no-shader trick, and it's up and running :) Strange, though; I've got a ATI x700; while it's not the newest card on the block, I can't see anything here that requires SM3.0 Neat work on the physics; had fun building a trebuchet for the tower level. Allan