• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

EricTrickster

Members
  • Content count

    294
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

142 Neutral

About EricTrickster

  • Rank
    Member
  1. I would pay in the theaters to watch a movie marathon of Howard the Duck, Gigli, and Kazaam before I'd ever read this again. OMFG. I read this to a co-worker and he's sitting there with a blank-eyed stare, drooling; I think just hearing it lobotomized him. But stranger stories have made for interesting games, so best of luck to ya!
  2. I'd love to see a game where every death you suffer yourself fuels your enemies, especially the end boss. That would be a strong incentive not to die, since all you'd be doing is making the game harder for yourself in the end. It's easy enough to write it into a storyline, using the idea of the enemy absorbing the spirits of warriors, blah blah.
  3. Just a thought I had. You could also do the forest scene from the Beast's perspective, if I'm remembering the movie right. Didn't he end up saving the father from the wolves? If you have him hear, or see, the father's carriage behind hounded by wolves then the goal for the player is to reach the father in time to save him. Intersperse that with wolf howls and barks, the sounds of the horse whinnying in fear, and the father crying out for help - getting louder as your get closer. You might have to jump ravines, climb up or down a cliff, and constantly change direction as the carriage runs wild trying to escape the wolves. There can even be moments when you can actually see the carriage and the wolves, and you may have to stop to fight the occasional wolf - losing track of the carriage in the process, and having to find another way to get to them quickly depending on the terrain.
  4. (why do I read this thread and become reminded of that Liquid Ice mint commercial in the hotel, where the bellhop finally screams "you're both right!!!") :) Slogging through the technical analysis of everyone's comments, I get what Estok is saying. Sort of. And I frighteningly agree with him, to the extent that it's sort of hard to generalize and make a list of the various methods you can employ to impart story, since the general methodologies are already employed (consciously or subconsciously) already in game design. What I might suggest, perhaps, is taking a random scenario from a story (I'm at work typing this so can't spend as much thought on it as I'd like), and then having everyone discuss ways you create a scene in a game around it that involves action by the player, and without relying on cut-scenes/cinematics to tell the story you want. That might achieve more what, I believe, is being sought for here.
  5. You were on the right page, all the population information you asked for is on the census website. You have look at the detail state-by-state, there isn't an overall single sheet for the entire continental US. US Census 2000, choose a state, click GO - and you're brought to all the tables for that state.
  6. If you're talking about the disney "look" - the blond in the blue dress and white apron - then yes, that IS disney's copyrighted image and no you can't just use it. In fact any image you take out of a book is that particular artist's copyright; just because the story may not be able to be copyrighted doesn't mean the image associated with any given printing is open domain. Which Alice are we talking about? This one? Or this image?
  7. Just understand that you're copyrighting specific images, or writing, and trademarking specific names in reference to that work (all separately). You're not copyrighting the concept, the idea, itself. Copyright is automatic, but what you're asking about is registering a copyright - which will offer you more protection, should you discover that someone infringed on your product. It's always a good idea, if you have the funds, to register your works; registration allows someone else to search the public record and see if a certain design has already been done before, eliminating the "how was I supposed to know" argument and putting more of the liability on the (alleged) infringer.
  8. Quote:Original post by sunandshadow Well, I wouldn't do it like your example because it's too intrusive, but if I had a friend who was, say, starting their own clothing line, I could name a clothing store in the game the same as their store and use their clothing designs. I had a similar thought about up-and-coming artists - I wanted to have character renditions of the band/artist playing their actual music in virtual clubs, or have their songs on a jukebox you could play.
  9. I'm definitely opposed to the "knock the competition" aspect of it, but I'm not opposed to product placement in general. I would definitely use the product in a positive light, but making the use of the product option - I don't want to, say, force gamers to buy Pepsi, but I would offer up Pepsi as a limited powerup, or as a fun item. Drinking a Pepsi might cause your character to break out in a dance, and force a short jingle/light show. I might have them as easter eggs, avoiding the direct advertising but offering a "reward" for players. If I can get a coupon tie-in (something I've looked into with another product), even better. Find the pepsi can, get a free pepsi! Stuff like that. The key is keeping it optional. I don't want to feel like I'm having a product literally shoved down my throat.
  10. Personally - it's an FPS. To me, story is...superfluous. I don't play shooter for a story, and I'd be willing to put money down on the odds that a large majority of people who play shooters aren't really interested in the story. It's a soldier mentality. You can come up with the most elaborate backstory possible, but all the person playing the game wants to know is: "What is my goal, what resources do I have to start with, what can I collect along the way, and how many things do I get to kill and blow up in order to get there?" Story becomes window dressing; it won't make or break the game, it's how the story elements are incorporated into the gameplay that makes the difference. Now, if you're planning on making this a story-driven FPS - more of an action/rpg...then I'll criticize ;)
  11. Google is your friend. retail-box-packaging. But I've had my coffee and feeling jovial, so this'll get you started: http://www.koolprint.com/software-boxes.asp
  12. It isn't that new an idea; just off the top of my head I can bring to mind George Martin's stories, where the chapters were titled according to the character they centered on, and going much further back the Hugh Lofting stories of Doctor Doolittle, where each chapter name was a one line blurb summary ("A Message From Africa", "Polynesia and the King", etc.) I do it behind the scenes when I write; each chapter I try to start out with a short two or three sentence summary of the chapter to help me keep organized. It's a lot easier than looking at "Chapter 8" and trying to remember what you wanted to accomplish there ;)
  13. If you wrote it on a napkin and both parties signed it, it's a "legal document". Whether or not the language is enforceable, well...that's a different issue. Just do a simple google on "non disclosure agreement", there are tons of samples on the web.
  14. I'm a little out of sorts fighting off a cold bug, so forgive me if I'm off base. But. Why do I get the feeling in this model that if I project ahead several months after release certain power-leveling players will end up controlling the game economy by just hoarding cash? With the cash removed from circulation, cash itself becomes a commodity - especially for the newer player who, as time goes on, will find it increasingly harder to obtain decent prices? At first I saw this compared to a commodities market, but after reading it again I feel like cash IS the commodity. If a player manages to control the flow of cash and manipulate it so that they're getting a percentage of other people's dealings...they'll make a mint, and with a limited cash production the poor newer players will stay poor. But again, I'm not married to this mindset - it's just an initial reaction.
  15. Quote:They had attempted to leave the planet in search for a way to feed the mana from Yio, a planet overflowing with mana, to the other planets that were slowly dying. This had not been tried before, so no one knew how it would turn out. It was decided that the only probable way to get out of the planet’s mana field was to encase them in a “bubble” of mana that would be pushed by the (magic) at a speed so fast to get them out of the planet’s field – so it would be like staying in Yio’s field when they got outside it. This seemed to work as they breeched the mana field’s edge, but just as they fully left the mana field, the mana “bubble” they were in instantly combusted, killing both (name’s) parents in a horrible explosion of mana, right before his eyes. Okay, I got a little stuck right here and didn't go any further. I also admit I haven't read more into the world history/background, but I don't think I need it for my comments - correct me if you feel I'm wrong. What I'm getting from this is they created a magical energy space capsule, just to give a more grounded description, and were attempting to break free of the planet's mana/gravity - to escape to another planet. Okay, so far so good. They launched the "capsule", they reached the outer limits of the mana/gravitational field...and blew up, inexplicably. Right? Now for the questions/comments: - I really find it hard to believe that BOTH parents would have left the planet, considering no one had ever done this before and they had no idea how dangerous it would be. I'm just not clear why they both needed to go, why no one else went with them, or who the boy was left with. It might be necessary for your story to have both parents dead, but it doesn't make sense to do it this way because no one will believe it. What parents would BOTH abandon their child like that - unless that abandonment is part of your story? Either expand on it and flesh it out or change it. - you'll also need to explain how the boy was able to "see" them explode, if they were at orbital height. Yes, you can use the space shuttle disasters as examples - but if you do, then consider how large the shuttles are and how low, relatively speaking, in the atmosphere they were when they exploded. We also have technology that brought the explosions up close and personal; he was a boy standing there watching the sky. I'm not saying he wouldn't have seen an explosion, but would he know what it was - since it's never been done before? How does he know they died? What did he see, exactly? For all he knew, the burst of light he very likely saw could have been caused by their "mana bubble" breaking free of the planet's "mana field" - I'll accept that no one has ever travelled to the other planets. But given that...how do they know that other planets are dying from a lack of mana? I have no problem understanding that they know their own planet is dying, but how can they know the status of other planets if their mana-technology is low enough that they've never travelled beyond the planetary surface? Again, I'm not saying it isn't possible - but by the descriptions you give, it isn't probable given what I'm reading. Based on my last comment I decided to go and read your background on the planets - and now I'm completely confused. If no one has managed interplanetary travel before, explain the following: Quote:Hunif: A well-balanced planet with a variety of climates and landscapes. This is the largest of the five planets, in size, population, economy and mana. It is the centre of all trade throughout Valtas. Many different races have travelled from their home-planets to live here because of the seemingly perfect balance in climate and elements. ?!?!? You've completely contradicted yourself, and now I'm absolutely confused. Most of my comments become moot if interplanetary travel is done with some regularity, but if that's true then the basis for your game doesn't make sense. Or I'm just not understanding something here. Help!