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ddn3

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  1. It looks like its treating warning as errors, u can disable that. See   http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2520853/warning-as-error-how-to-rid-these   -ddn
  2. The sort alogr.looks like some sort of block sort algorithm, manipulates 2 arrays, the order and dist arrays. As for why the C# is running so slow, u need to use a profiler to determine that.
  3. Most games ive worked on the text is embedded in the scripts but in the form of a code tag which references an external data table which load the text on demand, so both is correct to some extent. If your writing a game you don't want to go crazy and make the entire dialog system completely data driven (unless that's your plan), that's usually a bad fit. The logic which triggers these dialog and what dialog options available are encoded in the scripts, the only thing is the raw text itself it not hard coded into the scripts rather they are held in a giant dialog table externally usually in some spreadsheet form. You can also embedded other information with the dialog text which u can extract as well, such as wild card and the like etc..
  4. If you were ever interested in how these big AAA engines worked its well worth it to subscribe for 1 month just to get access to that. There isn't a minimum commitment like Unity so u can cancel at anytime i beleive.
  5. I enjoyed this video    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbNxu5_b1kQ   epic music at its best, synced with movies and games.
  6. While that's not a terrible idea, it could cause some problems. The data for sectors could grow exponentially and cause users' computers to crash as they enter a sector. To me it would seem better that if someone creates a situation where it could crash computers then the computers that crash would stop transmitting that data to peers. This would create a form of natural selection which will weed out bad data.     We'll if you're expecting exponential data growth i don't know of any data strategy which will work, however I still think u can piggy back on bitCoin blockchain backend. There are more than enough bits to play around with and by its very nature bitCoin has to store and accept all those transactions securely and forever. I think if you are intent on making a "universe" it has to be procedural for the most part and for that you'll be exchanging computational complexity for data. You will have to create some sort of procedural language from which the world is built and modified, these 'atoms'.    There is several strategies i can see, store the world in a series of complete stateful snapshots or store the steps in making the world, or a mix of both. By offloading the transactional atoms to create the world you can then just worry about storing the snapshots. These can be stored on a distributed p2p file system and can even be lossy. The thing is the atoms don't need to operate upon perfect data, they will operate upon any data even incomplete ones. The idea isn't to have a 100% perfect world rather one which is consistent and consensual among the peers. Who is to say that mountain in the middle of the desert ever existed if no one stored the necessary bits to re-created it, when everyone agrees now it's a flat river bed? I think you'll have to consider the world more mutable and dynamic, a living thing and build accordingly.   Good Luck!
  7. I suggest usurping the block chain protocol from bitCoin and stuffing your tranactional information in there somehow which you can use to rebuild your procedural world. That way you offload the largest obstacle, secure transactional integrity.    See    http://blockchain.info/charts/blocks-size   it's nearly 18,000 MB now, if you can figure out a way to cleverly link the transcational data of bitCoin to your procedural world... 
  8. There isn't anything wrong with using SourceForge or GitHub, I was just wondering if there wasn't already a large repro of just code made for this purpose. Bacterius is correct, I want a wide range of sources.    Thanks guys!
  9. I'm looking for lots of code to do some meta-analysis on. Does anyone know of an large open code repo? Worse case I can just grab a bunch of code off GitHub but that requires unzipping them and isolating the code part.   Thanks!
  10. Programming today is as much learning the tools and process as it is writing the code. It can get overwhelming to learn the tools and process before you even get to a single line of code. I suggest picking a language which comes pre-packed with all the process and tool kits already worked out for you maybe something like PyGame or Love.2D, both Lua and Python are full languages and you'll learn alot from them. It's important to pick one with a debugger though.   Good Luck!
  11. So I was looking at how they do pitch correction for modern pop songs and found a series of interesting sound editing tools. I've used open source sound editing tools like Audacity but this is light years ahead of it. Check out an example of editing within this sound tool ( Melodyne )   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EstyGsLpAs   Now that's an interesting UI paradigm, worth exploring for code creation / visualization / vocalzation.
  12. If your overly concerned maybe u can just give him stub graphics and integrate it yourself. As long as you know alittle Xcode and name the stub gfx the exact same names, but that's just making more work for everyone. When your contracting out esp off shore you're gonna take the risks but that would be weighted against the benefits.
  13. Games like Candy Crush, Clash of Clans, etc.. the hyper-success have a combination of excellent design / gfx and also well executed marketing plan to maximize their chances of success. These games usually are not the first game the company has done and through trial and error they learned how to maximize their success with a coordinated marketing strategy. The chances of a breakout success without such strategy imo is very low now. 
  14.   I wonder what lisp would sound like...   Given the functional and recursive nature of lisp it would probably sound like Indian ragas, looping forms with subtle permutations..
  15. This is very interesting, code as music. I wonder if we can extract musical forms from code structure and turn it into a musical form.. kinda like how people do for DNA and molecular music..