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Turt99

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  1. Not too old. It sounds like your already familiar with coding ideas, since you can code in PHP. I'm going to assume then that you understand loops and if statements. If that is the case then your going to be much better off then someone with no idea at all. I would suggest picking a game like pong and trying to make that. It doesn't matter what language or anything like that, the purpose for this first project would be to get your head around the constant looping that is done in a game rather then the wait for input that is done on a website. I used this same stepping stone and read a lot articles from this site, and I feel once you "get" how a game works your pretty much set.
  2. I don't like the idea of packing and unpacking the farms. The issue I see is that the world will change too rapidly. If players are always packing and unpacking their plots then someone who is just wandering around and viewing other players collections might not be able to return to a collection later if its no longer in the same area. I'd say it might be nicer to give each player a specific piece of land, and there farm stays in place. It might be that in order to make your farm larger you have to move to a new plot that is larger. This would make it so that someone could move and you would have to find them again, but it would likely happen less because it wouldn't be as simple as pack up the whole farm and take it with you. Another idea was already mention in that you simply keep the farms in a virtual space and offer portals to them, one way to do this might be to have a gallery which gives a picture from the front gate so a player can get an idea of the farm and decide if they want to visit. Using this method makes it easier to have "bookmarks" I would imagine.
  3. Quote:Original post by swiftcoder Better yet, don't tie yourself into *any* languages/APIs/platforms at all. Learn to program, not a programming language. Learn 3D graphics, not OpenGL or Direct3D. If you know 'how' things work, then using any particular API or language is relatively simple. I wasn't a fan of your Mac reply, it just seemed that you blasted Windows and Linux. But this is completely true, I think this needs to be taken to heart. If you learn how to program then you can easily switch languages when you need too.
  4. Your games aren't going to be any "better" if you make them on or for linux. One thing you do get if you make a game for linux is alot of people hungry for games. So you might get noticed a little easier if your game is for linux.
  5. I guess paypal is the simplest idea. I think since I'm only going to ask for a token amount of money for the game (I don't have any ideas of getting rich, I just think it would be awesome to make a little cash from my hobby), I'll just put the download link behind a paypal payment page, after that I don't think there will be any protection from making copies. I'm not going to store any customer data on my site, when I was talking about security. I just mean that if a customer comes to my site they might like the look of the game or even like the video, or something but they might not want to pay since they have never heard of me.
  6. I've been playing around with game development for about 6 years now, I have release a game I call PuzzleBlocks. I released it for Windows and Linux, and since it was more of a learning experience thing I just decided to release it for free (I always called it BETA) more or less so that I might actually have people play it. Now I feel I'm getting closer and closer to completing a second game, this time an adventure RPG with Zelda as the inspiration. What I'm undecided about is how I should sell this. I'm only looking at $2.50 maybe $5 for the game. The way I see it I have 2 options: 1) Complete the game the way I have it now. SDL and Cross Platform and use Paypal and my site to sell it. Problem here is that I need to do all the marketing myself. I don't have brand loyalty or brand security or anything like that. I don't really want to spend hours trying to block pirates or anything. 2) Rework my game for an alternate platform with built-in marketplace. iPhone is probably out, since the touch controls aren't a great match for my current game, and the cost of an iTouch, Mac Mini and Developer Sign-up is more then I want to spend. I am however thinking of XNA and XBLIG, it would mean more work before releasing but I think this would give free exposure in the marketplace, and give the customers security knowing that it passed the review. I keep telling myself to just finish and release Linux and Window versions, but I'm torn. You can take a look at my development blog to see some screenshots. What would you do?
  7. Interesting, I guess it might be a better idea to avoid the casting, issue. I was focusing on one side of the issue. I think you post has pointed me to a easier solution. Thanks NOTE: This is for Black Knight
  8. Sorry, yes this is C++. Thank you, I think the link you have sent should give me what I need
  9. I have a function that takes in a base class pointer, this function does the exact same thing for all derived classes except 1, I want to say if the object is a certain derived class then do 1 extra step. Is that possible? Virtual functions don't really help because the change involves a processing another object in a different way. I hope that makes sense, I'm having a hard time googling this because I don't know how to ask.
  10. I can't get through it. You need to go back and proof read what you wrote, its hard to follow because of typos or words in the wrong tense. Here is an example Your text "The girl said she drag you to her home" the word "drag" should be "dragged" I would write it like this "You are startled to find a stranger watching over you. The concerned woman explains that she found you in the streets and had to drag you home." The change does two things, first it explains that there is someone else in the room before you say that "The Girl" does something. Your reaction is first to think "What Girl?". Secondly it help create a visual of the story by describing the scene. Overall it seems like you've got a story laid out, you just need to write it out in more detail, so its not so choppy. Then you could read it out loud, any place you struggle to read, might be a place you need to rework to make it easier to read as well. NOTE: I'm trying not to pick at your english skills, but like I said, because of the grammer problems and the lack of description, it makes it very hard to read.
  11. Something else I wanted to point out is the faster the game lets you do things the faster you can get through content. If fighting a rabbit takes 1 min, then in order to get experience from 60 rabbits is going to take you an hour, that means the rabbit area is going to capture your attention for atleast that long before you can safely move on and forget about it. But if you can instantly kill rabbits in 1 sec then the rabbit area is only going to last for a minute or 2. Also an MMORPG is a RPG so I personally think having things take time adds to the atmosphere and make the world seem more real.
  12. I haven't played WOW, but I would suspect that the reason they have have you watch the flight is that they don't want you to be able to jump across the map like crazy. If you skip the flight then you might as well have jumped into a portal and warped over. If you can just warp around the game then its possible to camp a bunch of spawn locations and quickly cycle through them only stopping when you have something to fight.
  13. Thanks for the reply, I did some more research myself and I think I'm going to rework my game a little to use larger sprite sheets, it should make it easier to track things when they are all in one place.
  14. I've seen a bunch of tools that will take your sprite files and combine them into 1 large file. Is there a benefit to having all your graphics stored in 1 file and loaded to a single surface rather then using seperate files and seperate surfaces. I'm using SDL and 2D sprites.
  15. Thanks for the replies. I was hoping for answers like that. Once I have my game complete I will put multi-threading on the list for the second edition. I'm hoping to port the game to the iPhone or XBLIG for the next project, so since I will be re-working the code for the port I can also add features like multi-threading. Although thats still a long way off and maybe there will be a new latest and greatest thing to focus on.