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ironpoint

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About ironpoint

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  1. ironpoint

    Ahh my eyes! (game designer code)

    Egregious stuff. Maybe it only seems to work because fclose is forgiving or memory is being zeroed out by the compiler.
  2. ironpoint

    Planes

    I doubt there is power available. Maybe in business class. "2)What's the current rule on mobile phones? Mine is quite a decent MP3 player but I don't want to risk getting thrown in prison for listening to it!" If you're phone has 'flight mode' then turn it on and you're set. Otherwise, it will broadcast. http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/cellonplanes.html
  3. ironpoint

    how should I get into Physics

    First, I would work through all of Paul's math notes in order. http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/ If this goes well, get a $5 calculus text and physics text off of amazon or half, and work through all the chapters and problems, stopping about half way through the physics text. Then get a numerical methods book and study the chapters on numerical integration. That should be good enough to make a basic simulation of newtonian motion.
  4. ironpoint

    Freshman in college (advice)

    Quote:Original post by Yann L Quote:Original post by ironpoint No field hasn't been researched completely. The things that pay money have been extensively researched for decades and decades. The things that a recent chemistry grad can do as a job have been researched for decades. The things an industrial chemist does have been done for decades. It is known, lots of people can do it, and it doesn't pay as much as newer and less researched fields. That's a very naive point of view. The amount of money you can ask for as an employee is directly proportional to the amount of money your employer can make through you. It's as simple as that. The 'cuttingedge-ness' of your work is completely secondary. Of course you can increase your chances by being one of only few who could manage a certain task, but this is in no way a guarantee for a good salary. In fact, it often even backfires badly, because the cutting edge research field you're so good in doesn't generate enough money for your potential employer. I should really start reviewing my posts. I meant to say, "No field has been researched completely", which makes more sense. But, I have to disagree with your view on proportional money. Corporate managers develop a huge disconnect when determining where value is coming from, especially if they don't know much about the fields they are hiring for. Most (that I have seen) will not equate the work or effort that grunts are putting in with the size of revenues. They are taught in business school that management decisions alone create revenue opportunities and employees that create the products are a small necessary expense. It doesn't matter if a product generates millions, non-management employees have to change jobs to reap any rewards. This isn't what I was trying to say with the chemistry example though. I tried to make the point that their roles, methods, and techniques are so well hashed out that wages have declined. Food testing has been ongoing for decades, for example. Now food testing is as routine as policing the neighborhood.
  5. ironpoint

    Freshman in college (advice)

    Quote:Original post by RivieraKid ironpoint: you sound bitter. Its important that you enjoy your job. I honestly think I will look forward to crunch time and post crunch celebrations in the games industry. You dont need money to have a good time, you need people you enjoy spending time with. you'll meet more fun people in the game industry, i would think. All I can say is that I have a very good job for you. It doesn't pay well, but there is a lot of crunching involved. Post launch celebrations for coders and artists include 2 free beers at Applebees. Appetizers are extra.
  6. ironpoint

    Freshman in college (advice)

    Quote:Original post by random_thinker Look...the idea that a field like Chemistry of Computer Science salaries are low because the field has already been researched is nonsensical. These fields have hardly touched the surface of research, and always will be in this position. In a similar vein, the late ex-President Truman tried to close the US patent office during the 1950's because he felt that everything that could ever be invented had been invented. In fact, for computer science graduates, exactly the opposite is true; it is reckoned that by the time a 4-year student graduates, what they learnt about computers in year one is already obsolete. No field hasn't been researched completely. The things that pay money have been extensively researched for decades and decades. The things that a recent chemistry grad can do as a job have been researched for decades. The things an industrial chemist does have been done for decades. It is known, lots of people can do it, and it doesn't pay as much as newer and less researched fields.
  7. ironpoint

    Freshman in college (advice)

    Quote:Original post by Yann L Just a few comments (from personal opinion / experience): Quote: - Forget about graphics as anything other than a hobby. Graphics, as a field, is nearly done. There is only so many combinations of pixels in a 2D rectangle. It is a small application of physics, computing, and geometry. You won't be paid much more than someone cranking out HTML. Nonesense. Saying that graphics (especially combined with physics and optics) is done is like saying that the universe is conquered since man was on the moon. Good graphics programmers are extremely difficult to find on the job market right now. And the few that are available get very well paid. I'm thinking more in terms of traditional graphics research since this seems to be what a university program would be geared towards. My feeling is that when images can be produced which can't be distinguished from photos, then there's not much else to do in graphics. Realism is done. Consumers now expect that any image can be generated with CGI and the gains for improving image quality and realism are very few. Then there is the feeling that, no matter how much one studies graphics, it will never have the same impact as say, superconducting magnets or jet engines. It seems that it will only lead to slightly better movies and games. In terms of graphics programming, There are many jobs. But, I think most of these are way too demanding for what they pay. Graphics jobs seem to me as usually product development oriented. Companies expect the products to stand alone and make millions. These pressures aren't placed on many business programmers who only maintain or update systems, or develop products that aren't marketed outside the company. The kicker is that companies don't see (or acknowledge) the huge difference in responsibility and required knowledge. As a result, ASP .Net jobs can pay better for MUCH less work and expertise. To a manager, the two are almost the same job.
  8. ironpoint

    Freshman in college (advice)

    Quote:Follow 80% of this advice if you want to end up an unhappy square. You meant to say wealthy, intelligent, powerful, happy square.
  9. ironpoint

    Freshman in college (advice)

    Here's what I would tell my former self or someone like them, sorry if it sounds preachy: Career: - Forget about game development as anything other than a hobby. If you are skilled and go this route you will likely find yourself underpaid, surrounded by druggies and a-holes, and taking orders from non-techs who are paid twice as much to tell you to work harder. - Forget about graphics as anything other than a hobby. Graphics, as a field, is nearly done. There is only so many combinations of pixels in a 2D rectangle. It is a small application of physics, computing, and geometry. You won't be paid much more than someone cranking out HTML. - There are higher end versions of these fields that pay much better: simulation, CAD/CAM, physics, engineering, etc. - Concentrate on skills that the world needs, not your hobbies. Plan on completing a professional or research degree now, MBA, JD, PhD. Don't plan to be a grunt. Do something few else can do (e.g. an appendectomy, examining contracts, million dollar proposals, etc). - Do a hard science but don't make it a career. Computer science may not be 'hard' enough at your school (i.e. java, ui classes). - Some sciences pay less because they have already been extensively researched. For example, Chemists are paid similarly to policemen. Computer science seems to be going in this direction. - Study basket weaving on your own time, don't pay someone $500-1000 just to make you learn it. - Your goal is survival in the world (hopefully). Someday you may be 50, broke, and have cancer and will not care about c++. Go for the $$$. General: -Always visit your prof weekly and get your homework 'checked' before you turn it in. This requires doing it right after it is assigned so that you have time. -Demand the same information that the prof is giving to others outside of class. -Complain about almost everything. If you even get a B on something complain nicely in a logical way unless your work is indefensible. Push back aggressively but don't develop a reputation. Do not appear angry or confrontational. -If you are obviously wrong, don't complain. -GPA is extremely important for getting money, jobs, admissions, basically everything. People who hold the keys to these things won't even know enough about you to determine if you deserve them, so they go by a number. -Buy foreign edition books online weeks before classes start. A $100 US hardcover sells new for $5 in China as a paperback. -Being interesting in to others is not worth your time. Don't engage in poser games that are only meant to draw attention to yourself. Examples: streaking, stupid haircuts, tightroping on the quad. People should value you as a potential business contact or study partner instead of a circus act. Finally: Go your own way. One third to one half of your class will not be at graduation.
  10. Quote:Original post by dmatter Quote:Original post by ironpoint I don't see why there should be any traversal of a scene graph during rendering. The scene graph describes spatial relationships and nothing about shading. The scene-graph isnt or shouldnt be a spatial structure, it holds the logical relationship between nodes. The scene-graph cares not for where an object is located nor what it looks like (or even if it has a graphical or spatial representation). However as always, its a fuzzy concept and people mix and match to suite their needs. I guess if we are talking about a specific implementation where 'scene graph' already means something unusual, this is true. What is the purpose or logical relationship of the scene graph you are talking about? ownership, object lifetime, dependency of some value, rendering parameters? In general, a graph that isn't constructed to maintain spatial information and relationships, in my opinion, shouldn't be called a 'scene' graph. The word scene implies a spatial organization such as in 'the scene of the crime'. The strongest logical relationship between chunks of geometry that requires a graph is spatial. I think that a scene graph shouldn't even imply a parent-child relationship (other than spatial), ownership, or object lifetime. I see that Nairou's original question is about Yann's implementation. Without knowing the purpose of the scene graph, Its hard to say if there is a better way, just that a traversal over a spatial data structure and sorting aren't necessary at render time. I would consider scene level visibility determination a distinct step from rendering.
  11. ironpoint

    GPL for Research Papers

    It is assumed that if someone wants a copy of a paper that is not already on the internet, they will send an email asking for one. Research is based on personal interactions because the number of researchers is small for any given topic.
  12. I don't see why there should be any traversal of a scene graph during rendering. The scene graph describes spatial relationships and nothing about shading. The parts of the graph that get drawn can register with the render list for a given material, which happens once instead of every rendering. Render order can be determined beforehand by sorting all materials and their passes into a list, so there isn't a need to sort anything during rendering except for alpha blended overlapping geometry. Each pass for each material is traversed in the presorted order. If there are any pieces that need drawn for that particular material, they are drawn at that time. The scene graph only feeds the model transform to the process, and even this can be cached in whatever node is being rendered.
  13. ironpoint

    How much are you saving?

    Quote:Original post by Alpha_ProgDes I'm hoping after my review I'll get a good bump in salary and can start on a nest-egg. Don't get your hopes up. I would guess only about 1/3 of companies will consider a cost of living raise. Most people have to threaten to quit or actually quit to get what is due. Companies realize that, without advancement, people will hang on for a couple of years before quitting, and this is built into their routine employment strategy.
  14. ironpoint

    A new Cold War?

    I think it has nothing to do with arrogance. It is designed to make Joe Average mad so one side or another will go along with weapons projects. The Iraq war is winding down and the Bush circle needs a new excuse to grab the hundreds of billions of dollars they've been taking. The people won't accept another shooting war, so a new cold war is exactly what is needed. I would not be suprised if Bush and Putin are working together on this noise. They met within the last couple weeks, probably to plan what they are saying now in public. War and conflict is about money and control of resources. It has nothing to do with democracy, safety, freedom or any of that. Look at the sequence of events: U,S, missle interceptor and bases are built: money. Russia responds with new ICBM: money. US builds missle shield: money. The idea is that both sides have 'no choice' as Putin put it to tax their citizens into the ground.
  15. ironpoint

    Best Type of Compensation

    Management controls pay and bonuses including their own, so therefore they control profit. You want to participate in gross revenues, although that is unlikely to happen unless you are famous or powerful. Profit sharing, options, bonuses are all ploys to try and get employees to work harder for nothing. The top 5% may get real perks only because it pays back 20 fold in effort from the other clueless 95%.
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