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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Aeramor

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  1.   Have no idea about Crowdfund Buzz but it is not something extraordinary to have a US company by non-US for KS purposes , so see no reason to call it as scam.   I was referring to the makers of the game. Their kickstarter says USA but they are not from nor do they have any presence here. Crowdfund Buzz IS in the USA but all reviews online say scam.
  2. Posing as an American company (Denver Co.) when you are really in Kharkov, Ukraine is also a really good way to come off as spammy and/or a complete scam.   A google search of CrowdFund Buzz shows mostly articles calling it a scam.
  3. I think the message here is a bit dated, but the spirit of that message is spot on. There is a ton going on behind the scenes of modern day engines. And if you don't know what those things are you will have a really hard time tracking down bugs. Studying an engine that is already in place is a good start but to really learn something most people (me included) need to actually do it. I often I find I learn faster by doing something and making 18 million mistakes than by following a tutorial. It's like if someone led you through a dark room to the exit, you might be able to find your way back from the same starting point but come at it from a different direction and you'll be lost, scared, and alone.
  4. This lightly touches on an important aspect of team development. You should never do actual work from a shared folder in any cloud platform. Each team member needs their own folder to work from (it's great to have constant back ups of ones own work) and at key points upload to a central repo (git,svn,perforce, etc etc)  My personal recommendation is Dropbox for your personal work folder and git that you host yourself. With a bit of work dreamhost can actually run your git server quite well. Been using this system for awhile with a geographically separated team for years and it works well. I recommend hosting it yourself because almost every team has and can afford a website but github can get expensive for an indie team just starting out and you certainly don't want all of your work to be public.
  5. I have a brand new top of the line macbook pro retina (15") and I can tell you from personal experience this is *not* a development worthy machine. It can run games like Diablo 3 reasonably well (~20fps) but for development you need much more processing power because your games will often not yet be optimized and you will be running with debug flags.    That said a good development machine doesn't have to break the bank, get a decent i5 with ~16+gigs of ram and a 460gtx+ and you'll be fine to develop anything outside of triple A visual quality games.   If you do decide to use your mac: disable integrated graphics while debugging (i've noticed it doesn't auto switch as well as with it does with normal games/apps) and also make sure you have a legitimate copy of windows 7, I've seen the pirate copies cause endless headaches for devs :/ Not to mention if you want to be a developer you shouldn't be pirating anything anyway, it robs all of us.
  6. Any data being transmitted only needs to be interpreted on both sides, at the end of the day it's just ones and zeros in a particular protocol. As long as they both understand the messages it's not an issue if they are windows, linux or on a potato.   If you are asking for a specific library to use, just google it; there are many.
  7. Thade and Milcho covered most of the things I would have brought up. But a solid re-read is highly recommended; grammer/spelling errors abound.   I did however want to reiterate on the rape point. This is not a subject to be taken lightly. While I understand its importance to your plot (jenna becoming pregnant by West's (who I assume is "Scott") baby) it is still just a bad idea.    Just one other point I should make real fast: Do NOT put your personal email on anything that sells more than 5 copies. Putting your personal email even on a support website is not only unprofessional but something I really just cannot recommend (mostly for your sanity's sake).
  8. Do you have access to the server? IE: root access to a server or are you planning on having this on a traditional web host?   If so you may want to choose something more along the lines of a nosql package. I've used a few before and while not the most optimal mongodb would work well for your purposes. It has a pretty easy interface and allows for much more dynamic content creation/storage.    If you are to have a rigid structure for the database, try to go with a general "enum" state of mind while designing it. Since it's mostly text you could skip that part for simplicities sake, but in this one case I advise against it. Try to make sure each message (even if already composed) contains an id for what kind of action it is as later on you may require access to it.    Glad you caught it already as I almost always advise against 'generic' variables like variable1-5 just being hard coded into the DB, use an array if you must but this should be avoided as there is little context as to what is actually going on with them making it very difficult for code to find problems.   Lastly you definitely will want to consider using an auto time stamp for events.
  9. Learning all of the commands/syntax in C++ is barely 10% of the battle. Really it comes down to logic and math, while there are certainly different paradigms used in different languages the process is mostly the same. Still C++ requires you to think about more of these simultaneously as it doesn't handle any of it for you.    Think of it like learning a musical instrument. You can learn all the keys/strings etc but you still won't be Aerosmith overnight.
  10. I think it's been said pretty well above but if you are not sure of it's value then you should not be making that call. But further to that point is: if you want to build a high end MMO and 1 Million even makes the balance sheet then you do not have enough capital to pull it off in todays highly competitive market. Not in a way that will recoup your costs anyway. Look at it this way: if you are comparing 35% royalties to 1 million up front (as if they are equal) then you are explicitly stating that you INTEND to make < 3 million dollars. If you intend to make less than 3 million, but you are going to spend > 1 million then I recommend a different avenue of approach.   But if you really have that kind of money to blow feel free to hire me. I'll build it all for you for a scant 1 million dollars! :P
  11. I recommend a lot more time investigating how games are made and just how much work making even a simple game is before tackling something like this. 
  12. You need to disable culling. It's doing either CCW or CW culling but if you want to see both sides it needs to be disabled.