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Dragon88

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About Dragon88

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  1. Dragon88

    GDNet Slim

    Quote:Original post by superpig Quote:Original post by Dragon88 Quote:Original post by superpig Quote:Original post by Dragon88 The front page is all kinds of fucked up in Opera. Almost unusably so. I can provide screenshots if you want. Otherwise, good work! Have you cleared your cache? I tested the frontpage in every version of Opera I could get my hands on, and it looks OK to me. Indeed, I have. I'm using 10.60. I'm also noticing that the bar along the top is messed up in a couple ways. I've just installed Opera 10.60 on my Windows 7 machine, and the front page is rendering perfectly to me. Are you absolutely sure you cleared your cache? Is it possible that there's an upstream cache holding onto an old version of our CSS for you somewhere? Yes, I'm absolutely certain, and it's possible. But if so I have no control over that.
  2. Dragon88

    GDNet Slim

    Quote:Original post by superpig Quote:Original post by Dragon88 The front page is all kinds of fucked up in Opera. Almost unusably so. I can provide screenshots if you want. Otherwise, good work! Have you cleared your cache? I tested the frontpage in every version of Opera I could get my hands on, and it looks OK to me. Indeed, I have. I'm using 10.60. I'm also noticing that the bar along the top is messed up in a couple ways.
  3. Dragon88

    GDNet Slim

    The front page is all kinds of fucked up in Opera. Almost unusably so. I can provide screenshots if you want. Otherwise, good work!
  4. Dragon88

    strtok not threadsafe on windows

    Huh. I've been in C-land for a long time, and I've always found myself reaching for strstr() instead of strtok(). I guess I probably end up more or less re-implementing strtok(), but at least it's thread-safe, and allows me to deal with the double-delimiter issue easily enough.
  5. Dragon88

    Belated Breakdown

    :( I wore out my scrollwheel and I STILL don't know how to draw an explosion like that
  6. Dragon88

    Hint pages

    Out of curiosity, what loop composer did you use to make the music?
  7. Dragon88

    The Thing That Should Not Be

    You'll really know you're in deep shit when a stranger who looks disturbingly like Brad Pitt starts showing up, you move into his house in the middle of the ghetto, and learn how to make soap together at 2am.
  8. Dragon88

    Prinz Eugn vs. Gamedev.net File Manager

    Very nice stuff. The Dominion looks like it just got cut in half by a hugeass lightsaber. Is this deliberate?
  9. Dragon88

    Quiet, I'm busy not doing anything...

    How's the gamedev book coming? Is it finished? Is that it in the link?
  10. Dragon88

    Playtest Mode

    Could also be a symptom of the power supply. Just something else you can check. PSUs often behave oddly when failing.
  11. Dragon88

    I'm in trouble.

    your 6 year old has an email addres? o.O
  12. Dragon88

    XNA/.Net and a love/hate relationship

    Quote:Original post by phantom The end result is pretty much what was said in the XNA Performance talk from GDC08 which I listened to recently; C#/JIT is probably at the level of around C++ compilers of the mid-90s. Getting there but sometimes it's lacking and things like inlining are a bit hit and miss so expecting vectorisation is a bit much anyways [grin] TBH, that's probably all they really need. The low hanging fruit has probably already been plucked, the remaining optimizations are going to be the things that give you an extra couple percent but take a lot of work. I guess I haven't ever benchmarked, but I doubt a '90s era C++ compiler was THAT much slower than one minted yesterday. The inefficiency of your algorithms are a far bigger impact on speed than your compiler's minute optimizations (the ones that aren't low hanging) ever will be. That said, C# is an entirely different beast, and it most certainly does need the optimizations, but I think they're probably near the point of diminishing returns. But that's what I said when everyone was going gaga about quad core too. Look how many people listened then.
  13. Dragon88

    XNA/.Net and a love/hate relationship

    Quote:Original post by phantom The main issue is that the JITer is very time constrained; it has to compile and optimise the code as fast as possible which rules out all manner of optimisations simply because it doesn't have the time. A off line process however isn't time constrained and thus would be able to perform deeper/better optimisation than would be allowed at run time. So, it would have the time to consider code paths and to do things such as auto-vectorisation to take advantage of the SSE/VMX instructions of the x86/x64 and XB360 hardware. (afaik only the Intel Professional C++ compiler auto-vectorises right now, other C++ compilers use intrinsics to get at the features which while requirng brain work is still better than nowt.) This is no small thing either; the XB360 has 128 VMX registers (per core iirc) and most of its floating point power is wrapped up in these. For most games the lack of vectorisation isn't going to be a huge problem I grant you, but it just irks me that there is all that "power" laying about which we can't get to, and floating point performance IS a known bad spot for .Net applications and by extension XNA, it's just more likely to show up on the XNA side as games have a tendancy to use floating point functionality more than your average business app; also the later tends not to demand 30/60fps updates [wink] How many business apps run on an XB360? I'm sure they've thought of this in some form and fashion, as they're certainly pushing XNA and C#, and the XB360 is one of their main targets. How heavily does your application utilize SSE when pre-JITed on a PC? Worth noting that register count != power, but I understand what you're saying. Wish I could be of more help, but I'm a relative noob to C#, and I've never used XNA at all.
  14. Dragon88

    XNA/.Net and a love/hate relationship

    Quote:Original post by phantom Quote:Original post by matt_j Would you happen to have any sources saying there's no JIT on the 360? How much of a speed penalty does that end up being, I wonder. I think you misunderstood me; there is a JIT on the 360 and it works just like the Windows version. What is missing is something like ngen which can be used to pre-JIT/compile the exe so that instead of doing a runtime compile the code is compiled, optimised and then cached on disk ready to be used on the next run. Paint.Net is a good example of an application which does this on install. I understand your point, but I am a little curious what kind of performance penalties you're seeing. Is it a big problem? Sounds to me like it's actually not that bad of a problem, if you approach it creatively. As I understand it the JIT is called on each method/segment of code the first time it's run, so what you would want to do to get the effect of pre-JITing would be to make sure every function is called before gameplay begins. My approach to that would be to have a brief demo play when the game starts, which exercises the engine a bit, and gets everything all JITed so it'll be smooth when the player starts playing. Thoughts?
  15. Dragon88

    New Weapons Art & ...I can haz Porsche?

    Nice ride, congrats. I hope I'm not being overly critical, but I think the bullets for the M249 don't look quite right. Too shiny, or something.
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