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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

MichaelT

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  1. I would not worry about C++11 too much. It'll be years before that version have become widely adopted.
  2. The way I see it is that it (C++) is only as complex as you make it. C++ has a lot to offer, but then there is no requirement to use it all. If anything, I see far too many coders who just go crazy with using as many c++ features as they possibly can. I many cases I would guess it is (again) simply because 'they can'. If they 'should' is a whole different story. I mostly code C and use C++ features where it makes my life a little easier. But for the most part it's C, unless there is a good reason not to. I would suggest you not to waste time on D. It's been around for some 6+ years now, and I am doubtful you'll find much work in that area, if ever. @whtemple1959: Just start easy with some very simple programs. Try to stick to the simple things in the beginning, using as few keywords as possible. Using your analogy, draw stick figures to familiarize yourself with the tools. But keep coding, even if it is the most simple things. Like doodling. In time (depending how much time you spend) you'll pick up the basics soon enough. As far as the tools go, don't worry about them. Install QT.. or MingW. But the only thing you need from them is to make them compile a program. If you get that working, you're good to go. All you need to focus on right now is making small programs. Here are some links for you: [url="http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/"]http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/[/url] [url="http://www.cppgameprogramming.com"]http://www.cppgameprogramming.com[/url] I haven't look at them closely but I am sure you can find others later. Learning to walk before running is important. Also, If you want to be inspired, have a look here on what others have done: [url="http://www.pouet.net"]http://www.pouet.net[/url] Hope it helps.
  3. [quote name='Bacterius' timestamp='1354279223' post='5005669'] ... [/quote] Oh lord, another 'goto' topic. Most production code really isn't very nice to look at. Just look at the source code for Doom 3 ([url="https://github.com/TTimo/doom3.gpl"]https://github.com/TTimo/doom3.gpl[/url]) It's not exactly the most beautiful code out there, but it gets the job done, and in the end that is what matters most. And as a side note, the Doom 3 source code is littered with 'goto', so you can certainly use it. But as with any loaded weapons... handle with care.
  4. Don't! If you have no experience go with UDK or CryEngine 3. Both are free to use while developing. Plenty of help to find as well as lot's of books and tutorials. Not to mention they are the best engines on the planet (with the exception of ID5 but that is not an option for you (yet)). So my suggestion would be to look at these sites: http://mycryengine.com http://www.unrealengine.com/udk Granted, it's not MMO out of the box, but my suggestion to you here is that you get a small multiplay game running, with let's say 16 people (believe me it's not easy) and make your gameplay work (also not easy). Once you have some experience under the belt, move on up the ladder. Crawl before walk, and walk before running grasshopper ;) Good luck. P.s Don't worry about polycount at this stage (it's mostly free these days on decent machines) you are going to have more problems with shaders and things like that. Go wild, and look into the places where the performance hurts
  5. Things to contemplate: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijxk-fgcg7c&ob=av2e http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cc61C-VsTko&ob=av3n Try listening to the lyrics. I am after the general hopelessness that many feel in regards to the control they have of political issues.
  6. Quote:Original post by davepermen as of today (right?) it is not allowed to be sold anywhere anymore. farewell, xp, you had your bright days. to all still hanging on it and believing it to be somehow better, well, move on. it's time to do so. best thing that ever happened: releasing the old, moving on to new stuff. Except selling you whatever machines that are still on the shelves in the stores. Moving to Windows 7 was like moving from 98SE to XP. Really, it is that big. Move on folks.
  7. Quote:Original post by phantom THIS is data.. not 'well, XP works for me'. Never argue with the data! :) Seriously though, since I switched to Win7 64 last year I never looked back. I have yet to find any game that I haven't managed to run properly on it, some way or other. At the office we are all still using XP's although we do have a trend to switch to win7 in about 2 years. I believe this to be fairly common, at least from what I have heard while talking to others in my field. As for support of DX9, I have to agree with an earlier post. It is better to use middleware to deal with the rendering/engine issues, and focus on the actual game instead. Why waste time on it when the market changes so quickly? Let others solve the problems for you, and focus on getting your product out the door instead. My two cents.
  8. OP: Sounds to me you're trying to get something done that would showcase your skills as well as having something finished under you belt? Then it depends what you want. Do you want to get more to the metal of things? Then something like Ogre or IrrLicht might be of more interest. Especially if you don't want to begin from scratch. However .. If your intention is to have something to show to game companies? Then they are probably more impressed if you do something with a more widely used engine. I would in that case suggest using either ID's Quake engine, Unity 3d, Unreal engine or Ogre 3d. They are also all free by the way, with a large community to aid. Out of all I mentioned, getting something done with Unreal Engine would probably be most impressive. Since you are very likely to see, or even use it in the industry. Having done something with any of those would show that you have the skills (but more importantly) and that you have the ability to finish your goals. In context of the latter, the tool you use is of less importance. I'd say the most important part is to show you can deliver.
  9. You need to check the environment path in visual studio (or the path in whatever compiler you might be using) and make sure it can find the files. Also, sometimes when you install the SDK it doesn't properly update the paths inside Visual Studio. If you are using Visual Studio 2010: http://msdn.microsoft.com/query/dev10.query?appId=Dev10IDEF1&l=EN-US&k=k(VS.TOOLSOPTIONSPAGES.PROJECTS.VCDIRECTORIES)&rd=true Hope this helps Also, the DX8 is rather old, and you might have to upgrade your code to work with DX9. You might be able to find an older SDK with the files you seek. Google is your friend :) (I can't give you a direct link or Microsoft lawyers will come down on me :) )
  10. <Off topic> Intel's chips are notoriously bad for anything 3D. Some chips have (or rather claims to have) OpenGL support, and others Direct X support. But in almost all cases I have seen, it is an abysmal experience. Anything 3D on an Intel chip makes you running for the door, money in hand to buy anything with proper 3D in it. May I suggest ION equipped notebooks (like hp 311) if money is an issue? I know it doesn't help you in your quest for performance. But this as a more open response to people in general, and why they should avoid Intel's little integrated piece of hell for something more useful. Such as the nVidia ION. </Off topic>
  11. No, almost any game is made in similar or identical fashion somewhere else. Sometimes you won't find out much later, or when someone tells you. I have done smaller games that others made later, some were quite successful on iPhone. Am I upset or sad about it? No, it just means the idea works. You only have to do it better.
  12. I think this is way more complicated than it needs to be. Fading is an excellent idea though. I believe that a simple "good - evil" bar would be enough. Employ fading on that and it would achieve two things: 1. It would add a sense of humour, which is always a good thing. Then I believe the rating would be informative and less offensive. And hey, those who want to serve the darker side can finally do it. 2. The fading would be forgiving to offenders, but the darker they are the longer it would take to be forgiven. Primarily though, by keeping it simple the rating system would be more accessible and easier to accept. I have voiced my opinion on the present system before. I am very happy to see some of those concerns finally being acknowledged. I am just sorry that it had to take such long time. I know of others (myself included) that simply stopped posting because the value of our post got overshadowed by our lack of ability to deal with people. Such as people with Aspergers etc.. The present system have been heavily penalizing to those kind of people. Some simply are rude, that doesn't invalidate the accuracy in their statements though. This change could help alleviate that, something I am very happy about. I don't mind being called words (by someone with Tourettes) I did not even know existed, as long as I get some valuable pieces of information out of it. So, even though I think the change could be more simple, I am supporting this change. On a final OT note: Typing this on an iPhone is à Palm ( is a pain) I kept the "corrections" so you can witness the madness called "autocorrection" on that phone. Oh the horror ;)
  13. Just create some way of doing what you want, using names and whatnot you prefer for the future. Then build some sort of interface underneath that. I am deliberately being vague since this can easily escalate. Being a bit wasteful can be a good thing sometimes, and don't worry about performance issues this early on. Those are issues you deal with when you get a more clear picture where extra efforts are needed. First, make it work. Then polish ... repeat.
  14. If the popularity of Linux raises to more than 20% then I'd start thinking about it. Above 30% I'd jump on the train. Until then, Linux/OpenGL games is a no-no.
  15. Most likely the compiler recognizes the pattern and just provides the one solution it knows. The developers might have reasoned that the expansion is practically "free".