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Captain Goatse

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  1. Of course there's plenty of stuff that self-taught programmers don't learn unless they are really motivated. Basics of cs, basics of working in a group, not falling in love with your code, basics of project management, agile development, etc and etc. All of which is pretty much comes along with any decent university education. I work in a field where pretty much everyone has master's degree of one sort or another. Everyone is a specialist in their field. I'd say if you were purely self-taught and not one of those college drop out rock star programmers who are making millions with their web 2.0 applications you are pretty much SOL. Also judging from these forums most self-taught programmers are usually mentally stuck in Visual Studio and unable to get out of the box to experience the world. Something which you are bound to do if you go through some kind of education. At least you have to get rid of that nasty neck beard and emerge out of your parents basement.
  2. Surely XBLCG is for different niche, or "hardcore gamers", but compared to Apples iPhone store it has a lot to be desired from. For some reason customers are unlikely to spend money on these games, despite the quality unlike in iPhone store where people spend money on "useless" stuff. For me it is currently iPhone development. Maybe I shall change once Microsoft starts to actually believe in the community stuff since XBLCG is a potential way to reach tons of gamers, but i don't see that happening any time soon.
  3. Quote:Original post by Dmytry The most ironic part is, Apple holds patent on interpreter for font hinting data in TTF format (i.e. for making fonts look OK on display). Linux distros can't ship with font hinting enabled, and you have to go through some hops to violate Apple's patent. What could be less innovative than holding patent on something, not implementing it yourself but instead using it solely to prevent others from implementing it? What stops Linux from implementing font hinting? Yeah, Linux. (nothing) (edit: removed a potentially offensive linux neckbeard comment) [Edited by - Promit on April 14, 2009 12:13:16 AM]
  4. Quote:Original post by Moe Quote:Original post by borngamer A Dell with similar specs (not nearly the drive space though) was around $5,000. How did you manage that? I've managed to price out two different Core i7 units, both under what you paid. The trick is to get the base hardware from Dell, then buy your video card separately. That's where Dell makes their killing - on the accesories. And way to ruin all benefits from ordering from an enterprise vendor. Most people who purchase products like that also have existing support plan or get one as they order. At least I wouldn't purchase $5000 computer without a good on-site support plan. While you may be amazed that you can put together "similar specced new egg rig", it is still a risk if you get it without decent support plan.
  5. Backwards compatibility hasn't ever really been Microsoft's cup of tea. They live by selling new products, not by people using old ones. Microsoft has made this easy for you if you update tools often: for example C# let's you compile backwards compatible MSIL. If you are building a system with lifespan more than a few years, expect to pick and store developer tools carefully or get something like Autotools/GCC and pick a version number for each tool you are going to use for the rest of the project's lifespan.
  6. Quote:Original post by Intrawebs Quote:Original post by Ashkan Another language war. I'm overjoyed! Ya, only a couple posts actually addressed the post subject line as to why c++ seems to be in the industry job postings vs. c#. Will someone think of the Mac/iPhone developers??
  7. Quote:Original post by ApochPiQ Are you kidding me? C# is becoming an incredibly powerful language, and with F# joining the Visual Studio family in the near future, it's looking like functional programming is starting to take a serious hold in the Windows development world. That's far more exciting than Objective C [razz] C# is great for the boring enterprise stuff people for which people used Java in the past and I love to use it when programming for Windows. You simply can't deny that iPhone is brilliant platform that is inspiring Indie game makers everywhere. Even more so than the XNA platform, which has had time to gain momentum for ages compared to the iPhone and the results are... boring. I mean even Mono runs on iPhone. That's pretty sweet, although Apple will probably never allow C# apps in the store. Totally not trolling at all. You guys are just being insecure about things. C# is very interesting language, but it doesn't have interesting or inspiring atmosphere revolving around it. It is like the ultimate stereotype of that fat square Microsoft guy from Apple advertisements.
  8. Quote:Original post by Dmytry I've no problem whatsoever with apple claiming that macbook air is thinnest when it isn't thinnest, but rest of apple's image... Observe: Without marketing: yet another proprietary BSD fork, plus very outdated builds of free(open source) developer tools, such as gcc 4.0.1 from 2005. With marketing: "almost full fledged unix system coupled with BSD userland and other pretty awesome developer tools" How about first commercially successful desktop BSD-fork that "just works" (stable, mature software) and actually comes bundled with some innovative value-adding software instead of generic package manager tree filled with worthless crap that is 95% of let's say gentoo or debian trees? I'd be lying if I said that, though. OSX isn't a BSD fork. so there <[smile]>
  9. You have understood polymorphism slightly wrong. Alternative design that takes into account polymorphism giving Shape only one virtual function: CollidesWith(const cShape& shape). Now in classes cTriangle, cBox and cCircle you'd override this CollidesWith member function and write Geometry specific collision code there. You could, for example, cast the Shape into a Triangle, Box and a Circle and call corresponding function. Now this is not neccesarily the cleanest design, but it would be an improvement over what you have now.
  10. Quote:Original post by ApochPiQ Well, I should probably clarify - there's two things I want to do with a Mac, should I end up actually getting one. First off is writing games; this doesn't really require a top-end machine, and having a machine closer to average consumer spec is obviously better for testing, etc. However, job number two is working on cross-platform support and heavy-duty multiprocessing support for Epoch, my programming language project. Having 4 cores to play with, plus a GPU, gives me a great test bed for making sure the language works and is as flexible as I hope it to be. For that purpose, having the Pro is worth the money. So I guess I've pretty much answered my own question at this point [smile] Get it! You won't regret it! If you need a laptop don't hesitate to get a 13" MB. Also you get nice discount if you are a student or take the developer subscription (it will pay itself off). My friend got one and it has been replacing his generic overclocker "newegg powerhouse pc", gradually, step by step. IMac is decent, but I wouldn't waste my money on the more expensive non-portable macs. I love the insecurity Apple products are stirring up in this thread. It clearly shows that their computers are having a great impact. Now that they are gaining more and more market share, I'd hate to be stuck with C# and Visual Studio. The interesting stuff isn't happening there anymore ;-)
  11. Coincidentally Apple also decided to release thinnest CEO in the world. Besides you man children need to grow up. I think it is hilarious that posters in this forum are so insecure that they feel threatened by new awesome products. Shouldn't it be the other way around? Embrace the change. 13" MB gives you almost the best bang for the buck in laptops around these days. Furthermore you get almost full fledged unix system coupled with BSD userland and other pretty awesome developer tools. And you can install windows in it if you start to get homesick and want to get back into comfty Visual Studio.
  12. Quote:Original post by CaptainJester Quote:Original post by Captain Goatse I think it is a very bad idea to push this issue down because language X happens to be your favorite language, since in reality it is a issue. I just finished porting some 2d physics code from C++ to Java and I'll have to say I am very disappointed in the pure number crunching performance of Java. With the C++ application I am able to push through 500 objects that consist of a polygon easily, whereas the Java application starts struggling heavily if the number of objects exceeds 100. Same computer, same code, different languages. And therin lies the problem. You wrote C++ code in Java, that will always take a penalty. When you are writing in a language you have to write in that language, not just copy code over fix the errors and say it's done. Any half decent Java programmer could look at your code and double it's output without breaking a sweat. Oh please, tell me how do I increase the speed of raw calculation code by utilizing these advanced features of Java? There is only a number of ways you can do x*y. Also thankyou for making useless assumptions on my skills and the skills of the people I work with.
  13. Eclipse needs a built in feature to remove the trailing whitespace without performing any dumb key-combo. Watching eclipse code that hasn't gone through the built in trailing whitespace removal makes me puke.
  14. Quote:Original post by Shabadoo Quote:Original post by shamy ... java programs are alot slower then the programe being developed in c++ eesh... do we have to go over this again? C++ is faster in some cases, Java is faster in others. If you like Java use Java, if you don't, use C++ (or Python, C, VB, Delphi, COBOL, etc). Quote:Original post by shamy and where is java language best used? Everywhere, of course(*). Cheers, Brett (* This opinion may not be relevant to the real world) I think it is a very bad idea to push this issue down because language X happens to be your favorite language, since in reality it is a issue. I just finished porting some 2d physics code from C++ to Java and I'll have to say I am very disappointed in the pure number crunching performance of Java. With the C++ application I am able to push through 500 objects that consist of a polygon easily, whereas the Java application starts struggling heavily if the number of objects exceeds 100. Same computer, same code, different languages. From someone's view who has been following Java for past five years Java has always been in the future. Java will be this and Java will be that and the performance WILL be greatly enhanced. The major problem, however, is that while Java has gotten faster and the library is great, it is not exactly built for game programming. Simultaneously Sun isn't a big enough player to focus on game programmer's needs. They rely heavily on volunteer work and the small games community is excellent. Sun focuses on enterprise development and quite frankly all this talk about the great future of Java is inane drivel. It has always been that way and nothing has happened. I like the language and the library, but the performance needed for cpu heavy games just isn't there.
  15. Unity

    I've found out that ICL performs actually far better than the VSC++ at least before the latest visual studio addition. Also I particularly dislike the error codes that VSC++ produces. GCC is a little bit better, but very still obscure especially in terms of template errors. As far as I know GCC is not 100% standards compliant, because it doesn't utilize export keyword at all yet. Neither does VSC, but VSC has a whole set of its own problems in terms of standards compliance. All in all gcc is not very good at optimizing, but it is available on almost any fathomable platform. It is a great tool if you're not stuck in the dead-end field of windows development. Visual Studio and especially .Net development makes me want to slice my wrists. You can't really choose your projects and majority of the projects tend to be like Java projects; plain boring. For some reason I haven't found VS that pleasant at all. On my current work computer (older Amd 64) the newest addition performs like a Java app, which is absolutely sickening. edit: Also ICC is a lot like GCC so if you can shell out extra 400 I'd get it if performance is that important to you.