DecipherOne

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About DecipherOne

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  1. Episode One

    The last few years have been trying for various reasons, and it seems that other things in life have demanded my attention more and more. This is fine as life is known to do, it changes, but when we cease to change with it, we become stagnant and static, which eventually leads to lack of ... Continue reading Episode One ? Source
  2. I really haven't been writing very much over the last few years. Well, except for code/documentation/tickets , but that'a not the type of writing that I am referring to. I suppose I simply haven't taken the time to do so, which I've felt I have been missing for some time. This has been in part ... Continue reading Negative feedback loops and the bastion of serenity. ? Source
  3. Mid-Year Update

    The ever changing fluidity of the universe never ceases to amaze me. It's something that we each must adhere. An rule written in our very DNA. One, which states that the best laid plans of mice and men, in short, we must adapt in order to survive. Like the protagonist of our current project, I [...] Source
  4. Wow, last year flew by. A lot has changed in the last year. The website moved, same domain, new host to actually have bandwidth as I'd been running the site off my development server for the last six years. I will be redoing the layout soon, adding some additional sections and will be updating information [...] Source
  5. Barricade Alpha

    Client : PhyerSoft Contract Length : April 2011 - August 2011 Role : Lead Developer/Programmer Tools : Troglodyte Game Engine, Adobe Photoshop, Opengl, OpenAL, C++ Platform : PC Barricade was the first real time game that actually had some content that I ever worked on. Mike Poole from Phyer was the designer of the game. The game was created using my custom C++ engine Troglodyte, which used Opengl for rendering, OpenAL for audio, DirectInput for gamepad controls. I initially was developing my game engine specifically for this game, but later left the group. I returned in 2011 to tackle the project again, with my engine in a more complete state. The torch was later passed on to another coder, and I'm not sure the state of the project these days? The alpha featured 3 robots, 4 levels, and 2 different kinds of blocks. The alpha showcases the bare systems of the game. It had interesting block match type of mechanic that is present in the alpha, but do to no visual feedback, is hard to pickup on. I learned a lot during the development of this prototype. Source
  6. John Deere Augmented Reality App

    Client : Catchfire Media Contract Length : July 2012, Approximately 30hrs Role : Lead Developer Tools : Vuforia Unity 3D Platform : Android With the help of Josh Larson, we set off to create a augmented reality prototype that our client Catchfire Media could use at an expo to display augmented reality technology to their client John Deere. It was a simple app that allowed for a 3d model to be displayed on the touch devices screen when the camera was pointed at a specific image. In this case the John Deere 500J. Users could then interact with the model, rotating and viewing the 3d model overlayed on the image. Various portions of the model could be selected and information about the tractor was displayed. This was a fun project and I hope to get a chance to work with Vuforia and Augmented Reality tech in the future. Source
  7. Wind-Up Football

    Client : Soma Games LLC Contract Length : July 2012, Approximately 30hrs Role : GUI/Systems Programmer Tools : Unity 3D, NGUI, C# Platform : IOS, Intel Ultrabook Touch Wind-Up Football was a collaboration with Soma Games. I was in charge of scripting all the logic for the graphic user interface, as well as using Unity's PlayerPref object to setup serialization for managing the games item system. I left this project early on as I was offered a Lead position working with Salt Shaker Games, but not before setting up most of the frame work for what would be used to complete the systems functionality. You can buy the game for the iPad Here Source
  8. Lost Origins: The Ambrosious Child

    Client : Salt Shaker Games LLC Contract Length : June 2012 - September 2012 Role : Staging Artist/Scripter/Lead Designer Tools : Adobe Air, XML, Unearthed Tools, Adobe Photoshop Lost Origins was a hidden object game, built from collaboration with developers all over the world, underneath the label Salt Shaker Games. This was the largest project I've worked on thus far with animators from Russia,Texas, and various coders from all over the country. Unfortunately, due to various issues the publisher dropped funding for the game when it was about 75% complete. I started off as a staging artist and scripter. I drew over 200 unique images in Photoshop and placed them in scenes and scripted game logic. After production quality assets were complete, I would go back and replace the temporary assets, test, and adjust logic accordingly. Later, the Lead Designer left the project and I was given the opportunity to take over. I got to work on some of the pacing issues and a few of the games puzzles. If only funding would have continued, but development was abruptly stopped in September. You can download the Golden Hour Build Download Here Source
  9. #rio20 if you haven't seen it, here's an interesting html5 site http://t.co/2Sjqd2JXXg
  10. Hello world!

    Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging! Source
  11. Dodge This.

    I've recently found myself with some free time between contracts. Not wanting to be idle for fear of being oxidized, I've got a few various projects going on. One proto-type I plan to share here in the coming weeks, while another project I am keeping somewhat secret. It is more of a personal project that is full of meaning and is still in an early conceptual stage. I do not plan on speaking any about that project until it is ready to be released. One project that I will share however is one I'm calling Trinity. For work, I am working with a small team of Independent developers. Since joining this team back in early June, I've worked on a various set of contracts. For some of these contracts we have been using Unity 3D and so I've been getting pretty familiar with Unity and have wanted to even use it for my own projects. I had worked with Unity previously to this, but never wanted to really make the switch for my own projects. I had spent a few years refining my own game engine and didn't want to abandon it. After working with Unity for so a while it started to grow on me and the portability options, ease of interface, and many other features, just make it a no brainer to use. Not to mention the free edition and reasonable price of the pro version. The Unity team has really done an awesome job and I'm proud to be a convert now. But enough of an ego boost for those guys . Wanting to keep my projects in a small enough scope to complete, I'm concentrating on 2D games. This in and of itself isn't a bad thing, but Unity, out of the box isn't streamlined for 2D development. There are a few packages available on the asset store that look to help with 2D games specifically, and I looked at them, and just didn't feel that they were intuitive enough for me to work with in a quick way. So, I decided to port over the most common libraries I used in my own game engine, thus Trinity was born. Right now I just have plans to use it for my projects. I have completed a first pass integration and have finished getting the same functionality from unity as I would my own engine, but with all the added benefits unity provides. As I continue to add to this functionality, I may toy with the idea of adding it to the asset store. Not really wanting to compete, as I don't want to spend a lot of time publicly supporting the framework, but really to offer a light weight alternative to some of the other frame works that are out there. I should come to a decision on this by the next week sometime. Source
  12. The Tell Tale Arts

    There and Back Again When I was about eight years old, I had spent the weekend playing a game which the likes of I had never seen before. A title called Actraiser , which was a mashup of action,rpg,and sim city type gameplay. After playing this game for most of the weekend, I remember talking to my mom about it and describing all the things I liked about the game, and all the things that I would have improved. My mom said something that stuck with me at that time, something that I had never considered up to that point, she said, "Maybe someday, you can make games and then fix all that stuff." I had rented the game for the weekend, yeah I'll date myself by saying we rented games for the weekend back then, so we took it back the next day. It would be fifteen years later before I was able to recall what the name of that game was, and I didn't play it again until then. The statement my mom said to me at that point planted a seed. However, I didn't get my first computer until I was eighteen years old. Up until that point I had pursued being a musician and a writer. It was when I was eighteen that I started first learning html, and then began trying to teach myself C++. But I'm getting away from the point trailing down memory lane here. The point is that Actraiser was really the first game that I ever played that made me consciously think about game mechanics. I had been playing mario , sonic, frogger, ect.. since I could remember, but this game made me go hum. Most of the narrative of this game was delivered through the gameplay and through interaction with angel, a little avatar who talked to you, the god of this planet. You would take physical form and go down to the earth to free different areas from monsters that had taken over the planet. After you cleared out the creatures you would then go into the sim city type mode and rebuild the city, using experience that you gathered from the action game play mode. Angel would explain different elements of the story as you went a long. It was all very cleverly done. It's been a little over twenty years since the experience of first playing that game. It still sticks with me to this day, and is probably one of the most heavy influences on me pursuing game development, the ability to create worlds that people can not only witness, but be a part of and experience. To be able to take on the role of another character is the ultimate empathic experience. It can literally put you in the perspective of someone else, and I look forward to seeing games explore this more. A perspective is useless however without well defined characters for the player to relate too, and without motives and direction for the player to experience. Of course this is more geared towards games that are character and story driven, and it is difficult to find a balance between a purely linear experience, and a dynamic one where story is involved. As I am currently in a design phase for my current project, I have been exploring various ideas on how to create the best characters and narrative for the game. Through this analysis I have been looking towards other forms of media for inspiration and asking myself, "What has been the most memorable characters, stories, and experiences, and why?" This is the beginning of a series of articles that will be exploring that question. I will be looking at five television series and five different games that have influenced me heavily in story and character development. I will also be going through and discussing strengths and weaknesses for each, and how specific lessons can be taken away from them, and possibly used in game development. I've chosen tv shows specifically for their episodic structure and because of their ability to weave a universe over time that makes us care about the characters. I have also chosen games because, well, that's what this is about. Now there are a shit load of each of these out there, so I had to make some choices, and while some of them have similarities, I've tried to have some contrast in my selection while still having those that have influenced me. So without further ado -- Our Line Up Tv Shows So, for tv shows, this is our line up. Next time, I'll start by taking two shows, doing a general overview, and then present my arguments and ideas. So, tune in next time, same bat time, same bat channel. Source
  13. I have to buy my son a laptop for his birthday this year so I can use my own computer more often. #geekintraining
  14. ah.. ten hours and I feel like a mini drill team has cleared my sinuses, this is the best I've felt in weeks. #AWESOME
  15. And we

    Server is back online. 2012 is off, more soon. Source