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Farmergnome

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  1. SOME SPOILERS: -Mike draws his pistol to chase eddie "havent used my pistol since the war" -Mike has reflections of eddie, and eddie of mikey, check the interior windows -Who does that soilder look like in the chopper next to eddie on the gun, and the one after the ending... -All the dialog at the end of detriot if you dont shoot eddie, how eddie wants there relationship to co-exsist like it did some years before the events of detriot. -If you shoot Eddie, you both suffer a blow to the head and collapse. -If you shoot emily at the end of detroit, after the lighting your sprite is eddie. -The detriot ending... -And the truckton of minor dialog stuff and visual glitches and whatever else I missed... Mike and Eddie are the same person, they represent the inner good and evil in the rapist, thats why every evil act within the game is done as eddie, and every achievable good act as michael.
  2. Thanks for trying it before passing judgement people, its most awesome :)
  3. Neither characters are the victim, your just going to have to play it :P
  4. Its a short game, but theres certainly a plot and rape isnt all the game is about, ive made a few endings so everyone will probably get something different out of it, but give it a shot if you want. I just fixed that chasm bug and added some more endings.
  5. Hi guys this is my first serious game, that I made for a TIGSource competition, I would love you guys to have a play. The game follows 2 characters through a series of events with a central theme of rape, I thought id post it here even though its not everyones cup of tea... That being said, its not what it seems... Heres a short video Youtube video Heres 2 links to the game download: My download link Here is the competition thread: Competition thread Thanks for playing, tell me what you think, good or bad. [Edited by - Farmergnome on August 8, 2009 6:30:47 AM]
  6. Celebreties are the exception in this case, its like saying someone hires <instert AAA BIG NAME DESIGNER/PROGRAMMER/ARTIST HERE>, its going to cost you alot more reguardless, its like comparing carmack to a newbie programmer, ofcorse theres going to be a cost difference reguardless of profession, dont assume its just voice acting. The difference is they CAN demand that much, since they have something unique to sell, and they have proven themselves to be top of there game/have a following of fans. However a standard professional in any field has little barganing power compared to that, and while voice acting is more specialised, there is more than enough people out there to do it, so until there is more demand for it, or alot of voice actors leave for other arenas, there will always be enough people to fill the ranks, as it is with all gamedev jobs at the moment.
  7. Everyone is entitled to there own standard rate, however unlike selling a house, contracting is like running a race with many other professionals all offering similar things, if prices get too high, just as we have seen on many other fronts away from voice acting, people will look to affordable alternatives, if its outsourcing or hiring people away from unions/etc. You say it shouldnt be compared to other arts within gamedev on any effort/time/skill scale, yet it will be, because at the end of the day, your average tightass manager wont be taking losses to HIS royalties so he can get better voice acting, when he could make massive potential savings by hiring others, or just untrained, or put the money into other areas of need (gameplay anyone?). While im not denying a professional voice actor could bring alot to the table, for the time being the position is too easily filled to be a problem. Cheers
  8. Everyone is entitled to there own standard rate, however unlike selling a house, contracting is like running a race with many other professionals all offering similar things, if prices get too high, just as we have seen on many other fronts away from voice acting, people will look to affordable alternatives, if its outsourcing or hiring people away from unions/etc. You say it shouldnt be compared to other arts within gamedev on any effort/time/skill scale, yet it will be, because at the end of the day, your average tightass manager wont be taking losses to HIS royalties so he can get better voice acting, when he could make massive potential savings by hiring others, or just untrained, or put the money into other areas of need (gameplay anyone?). While im not denying a professional voice actor could bring alot to the table, for the time being the position is too easily filled to be a problem. Cheers
  9. Id assume to be working with a professional at "375" dollars a hour or somthing is seriously wrong, you can have a cry about royalties all you want, but while programmers, artists, etc arent recieving any, your going to have to do better than pull out some fancy talk bullsh!t to convince your average stubborn, tightass gamedev studio manager that you deserve more than the people building the game for the years of there life. Have a nice day
  10. Some of the reqs you will find with most investors is previous track record (previous games you have done?), also no one will invest in ideas, most will want a working prototype atleast with all the docs. Seriously consider a offline rpg, if your talking big money, mmorpgs and investors, then taking "hundred of copies" in losses from piracy doesnt seem to be a big deal, you also shouldnt define yourself to a genre from things like piracy, theres creative ways to minimise piracy with offline games which will also prove alot easier than writing some of the elements to a mmorpg. Start small as it was suggested before, im sure if you can pull of a offline rpg not only will you gain more respect within the development crowd, but you will have meet allies/fans along the way keen to push the project further eventually into the multiplayer arena. And after thats done hand your now finished rpg to interested investors/publishers and THEN ask for advances to develop to mmorpg status. Best of luck