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Etherstar

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About Etherstar

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  1. Etherstar

    New Project Advice

    Quote:Original post by openglJunkie Quote:Original post by Etherstar I personally just hate the fact that future revisions won't guarantee backwards compatibility. Where did you read that it wouldn't be backwards compatible. The site says plainly that it will be: Quote: OpenGL Wiki All that GL 3.0 brings to the table is a new way to create a context. You can use it to make a GL 3.0 context. Old programs that obviously create a standard context are not effected by this. They will continue to run. GL 3.0 doesn't mean that old programs won't run anymore. I may be missing out on something if you could please point that out. Since you're starting out a new project have you even gathered all the information that the game will require to be made ( story, characters, weapons ) that way you know how to design the engine around that? If not work on that until you get finished and then if OpenGL 3.0 isn't out, then you could try coding without the 3.0 features and just update your code to use it. However the 2.0 code will still be functional so technically there would be no reason to update it, although I suppose it would be a good idea. Thanks for responding. I think I had the typical knee-jerk reaction of panicking when I read about the deprecation model. I guess my concern was that when say OpenGL the 3.1 spec comes out, and the previously deprecated items I decided to use were now phased out (immediate mode), my program would essentially be broken at that point on systems using 3.1. However, you are right in that everything would still work just fine under 3.0. With a little sensibility, I should be ready for the transition regardless of when it happens.
  2. Etherstar

    New Project Advice

    Appreciate the response, and I have read this already. However with no definitive timetable on when deprecated items would be phased out of specification, I really can't judge what to plan for. I personally just hate the fact that future revisions won't guarantee backwards compatibility. However for me, OpenGL is still better than the alternatives. My plain at this point would be to implement 2D rendering in such a way that I could use immediate mode for now, and have the capability to then extend OpenGL 3.0 methods for rendering 2D graphics into my code base. Then at runtime I could check the OpenGL version, and call the appropriate methods. Does this sound like a reasonable approach?
  3. I'm going to be starting a new 2D game project using SDL and OpenGL. I am quite familiar with doing 2D using immediate mode, however with the recent deprecations set in the OpenGL 3.0 spec, I'm at odds on how to proceed. Should I even be concerned about forward compatibility or can I rest assured that my projects using immediate mode calls won't break in the near future?
  4. Quote:Original post by Yperloxas Have anyone seen this: http://www.transfusion-game.com/ They use not a texture or some sound effect,but the whole data set of the game. But they asked permission for this... They used all the media content, with explicit written permission from the IP owner. The technology they are using (Quake engine) is released under the GPL and therefore breaks no copyright laws. It sounds to me like you are trying to rationalize something that you know is illegal. Honestly ask yourself, why is it that you need to use copyright material? If you absolutely need to use it, find out who owns the intellectual property and get their permission in writing. If you don't, you risk litigation. If it were me, I'd stay away from IP all together.
  5. I'm an idiot, turns out I was trying to delete memory of some objects on the stack. Thanks for the help clarifying the source of the error.
  6. I have a list of pointers. I am trying to iterate through that list and delete all the memory those pointers have allocated. void Machina::CullInactives() { for (list<Machina *>::iterator it = inactiveMachina.begin(); it != inactiveMachina.end(); it++) { delete (*it); } inactiveMachina.clear(); } The debug assertion error occurs on the delete call. The debugger has assured me that the pointer is valid and non-null, and the object still exists. The actual error reads: Expression: _BLOCK_TYPE_IS_VALID(pHead->nBlockUse). Any suggestions as to how to solve the problem?
  7. Etherstar

    C# Questions

    Anaton, C# is a very good language choice for a mature beginner. Even though safe C# code does not use pointers, I find that to fully understand how objects work in languages like C# and Java, you need to have a good understanding of how pointers, references and memory allocation works. I found learning C++ first helped me a great deal. That being said, learning C# can make it a lot easier to understand these concepts and could provide an angle on the topic that makes it easier for you to grasp. More importantly, you certainly won't be wasting time learning C#. The book you have will probably do a great job of teaching you basic C# syntax and how classes, objects, interfaces and structs work. When you are ready to move on to such topics as Abstract Data Structures and Generics you will want to move onto learning .Net 2.0/3.0. Note that the .Net framework is just that: a framework. It is something separate from the C# language itself. It is more a library of extremely useful namespaces with loads of classes, structs and interfaces you will use in most of your projects. Your Visual Studio.Net 2005 is a great tool for learning and productivity, especially with C#. You should definitely use it.
  8. Did you make 2 separate Direct3D Devices (one for each render target?)? I once made an app with multiple viewpoints of a scene using MDX and pictureboxes as my rendertargets. I believe that I did all my rendering in the Form's OnPaint method, after creating a new d3d device for each target. I'm not sure though if this solution would suit your needs.
  9. Etherstar

    [C#] Exception handling

    If it were me personally, I would add try/catch blocks all the way up the call hierarchy. To me it would be easier to trace where the exception occurred. That's just my preference though and may be considered verbose. I just like everything as explicit as possible.
  10. Etherstar

    [.net] C# Renderloop

    I've always been a fan of the OnPaint() event handler method. You put your game loop inside an override of your Form's OnPaint method, then call this.Invalidate() at the end of the loop right away. A lot of people feel its hackish and ugly, but it gets the job done and I think it actually makes some logical sense going in the OnPaint method. It doesn't have the memory overhead of the DoEvents method.
  11. The one I've renamed to Delete Me. Thanks for the response!
  12. I'm trying to remove a GDNet showcase entry but I am unable to because there are comments on the entry which are not my own. This causes me to receive an error saying that I am not allowed to delete an showcase entry with comments. It is important that this entry is removed. Thank you.
  13. Sometimes the root directory gets changed through the course of your application and isn't always start in your executable's directory. Instead, reference files explicitly by making your paths like this: string path = Application.StartupPath + "myImagePath.bmp";
  14. Etherstar

    C# question of design

    Pardon me if I miss something in your explaination but are you basically trying to manage a list of monsters that are attacking the player? The solution to your problem is either using a built in list collection or creating your own list. I recommend using the List Generic class. With this class you could create an instance of it that represents monsters that are attacking your player. You simply call the add method to throw in new objects of any type (which is good for you if you are using monster objects of varying types). If a player kills a monster, you can simply remove it from the list using the Remove method. Generics and lists are very strong parts of C# and can make your life a lot easier understanding how to use them. Hope this helps.
  15. Etherstar

    omg tv

    So...Super Bowl at your place?
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