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Evil Bachus

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About Evil Bachus

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  1. Breast Physics

    A half-silly, half-serious question: How are the breast physics (re: bouncing) programmed in most games (like DOAX2) these days? My mind started to wander while driving home from lunch and I realized that for such a prevalent feature in recent games, I've never seen a tutorial or article or whatever explaining how its done. Morph targets? Skeletal animation? I realize the silliness of asking, but I can't be the only one who's wondered about it.
  2. this article is baseless!

    I'll bite. What's baseless about it? http://www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~tants/softShadow.html
  3. Doom 3 does a bit of extra work to cut down on the amount of time per pass. Basically it draws just to the depth buffer, then it draws shadows, then it makes a pass or two per-light for the textures. And obviously you can throw in things like scissor testing, etc to cut down on how much drawing per-light you have to do. http://www.beyond3d.com/interviews/carmackdoom3/
  4. How're the star wars books?

    The Thrawn Trilogy by Zahn is fantastic. It's a must read. The Thrawn Duology that takes place 10 years after the trilogy (19 years after A New Hope) is also pretty good. The New Jedi Order is a 21 book macro-series that takes place 25-30 years after A New Hope. Excellent, but involving and time-consuming. There are books for every time period with more coming out all the time. For instance, books covering the rise of the Empire immediately after movie 3 are about to start coming out, and next year will feature a new series that takes place 40 years after the movie. TheForce.net has a great books section that's a great resource. The reviews and Timeline sections make for good reading and can help you decide what to get.
  5. is there a future in gamedev for MacOS ?

    I program exclusively for the Mac. Apple is always improving their OpenGL implementation, and they are in fact hiring new people to work with nVidia and ATI. Several underlying technologies on Mac OS X use OpenGL extensively, so Apple has a vested interest in making their implementation of OGL the best it can be. ARB_VERTEX_PROGRAM and ARB_FRAGMENT_PROGRAM both work just fine on the Mac, as does Cg (the compiler and library has been ported over). GLSL *is* supported on X.4 Tiger, but only in the software renderer. Hardware support is coming. CoreImage and CoreVideo filters are in fact written in GLSL and compiled down to ARB_FRAGMENT_PROGRAM with a JIT compiler which will later use ARB_FRAGMENT_SHADER/etc when it becomes available. There isn't a huge difference in speed. Yea, Doom 3 seems to run a tad slower, but it isn't some huge dog. It runs just fine on my 1.8GHz G5 with a FX5200, and that's hardly the best Mac around. And the Mac isn't inherently slower, it's just a matter of how much time is spent in porting the game over. For instance, Quake 3 runs *faster* on the Mac than it does on the PC side. Obj-C and Java aren't the only game in town. C and C++ can be used just fine. There are a ton of cross-platform APIs like SDL and OpenAL that work great on the Mac. Apple's development tools are 100% free, and are quite good. The documentation is pretty good. Apple's mailing lists are active. There are lots of web-sites out there for development (both game and non-game related). The Mac now gets almost every big name game. The few that we do miss usually have a technological reason instead of a business one. For instance, no game that uses Havok has been released for the Mac due to Havok being asshats about the Mac version. The indie shareware market is quite healthy on the Mac. In fact, quite a few indie game makers report that the Mac version outsells their Windows version. The market isn't huge, but it's here and it ain't going away anytime soon. In fact, it's actually growing.
  6. psp game

    Wipeout. Pretty good game, and required if you want to surf the web with a PSP.
  7. Hugo spammed the board yesterday and all his posts were deleted and the account was banned. So it's probably a bug that his name still appears under "Last Post:", but that's why you can't find a reply from him.
  8. Reading Dreamcast Disks

    A Dreamcast disc is a special format called GD-ROM that supports up to 1GB discs. As such, it can't be read in a normal CD/DVD-ROM drive. Only a Dreamcast can read a Dreamcast disc.
  9. The people who would follow the rules would read it, but then you don't really need to present the rules to them in the first place. The people who we would need to follow the rules, wouldn't read them, and there's no way to make them. I used to visit a forum where it listed the rules before signing up, *plus* required you to ace a quiz on the rules. We would still get morons who didn't read or follow the rules.
  10. Questions about HLSL

    Quote:Original post by digital_phantom Can HLSL be used in DirectX 8? Nope, but Cg (which is essentially the same) can. Quote:Is there any tutorials on HLSL? http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=309055 Google can typically answer easy questions like this far faster than a forum post...
  11. Does anyone know any cloud generation methods?

    http://freespace.virgin.net/hugo.elias/models/m_clouds.htm Simplicity often works best. Unless you're specifically showing off clouds, a simple fast method works better than a complicated slow one. How often does anyone notice clouds anyway?
  12. OpenGL Cg + openGL question

    1) There's no way to get extra varying parameters. There's a minimum of 96 uniform parameters (though this number may vary depending on the profile; I only use arbvp1/arbfp1) that are set for every vertex. What are you doing that requires more than 16 varying parameters? 2) Half is supported by some profiles, but not all. Fixed is supported in fragment programs, but not vertex. Int is supported in some profiles, but is usually converted to a float. Not that it matters, as there's no easy way to "unpack" the data (no bitshifts, bitmasks, etc). 3) Pixel shaders are limited to color and texture inputs and the uniform parameters, and that's it. If there's something extra you need to pass (like the normal), then pass it through the extra texture coordinates (output from the vertex shader).
  13. Most Powerful Scenes in Film History

    I'll be 25 in two weeks. Picked scenes where I tend to get emotional, and not just good scenes (which is I assume is the point). Tried to avoid duplicates, but there may be one or two. Almost Famous - Singing on the bus; Penny Lane dancing after the concert Empire Strikes Back - "I am your father." Ferris Bueller's Day Off - The car scene Field of Dreams - All the stuff near the end; The girl falling, the father, the line of cars Jurassic Park - The first dinosaur shot Man on the Moon - The funeral scene Lord of the Rings - "You shall not pass!"; Crowning Aragorn; thanking the hobbits. Patton - The opening speech Psycho - Shower scene Saving Private Ryan - "I'm a schoolteacher." Schindler's List - Whole damn movie Spartacus - "I'm Spartacus!" Tron - Lightcycles Wings of Honneamise - The shuttle launch
  14. Get Me A Job

    Lifeguarding. Easy work, decent money, cute girls in bikinis.
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