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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

clum

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  1. I also got my distro I've been using for the last while (Gentoo) on the test. If you're just doing it for learning purposes, then every distro has its advantages and disadvantages. But if you're actually using as a normal operating system that you actually want to do stuff on, Debian and Gentoo are the only ones with normal package management - essential for normal computer use.
  2. Those are great pictures. In order to get the render to save to a file in wings, click on the strange little picture next to the OpenGL render button to change options and select Render to File instead of Render to window. Or something like that.
  3. Quote:Original post by bobstevens Funny how an "Isn't Gentoo better than any other Linux distro???" post shows up on every message board, occasionally thinly veiled. Am I forced to post a http://funroll-loops.org/ link? Debian's package management is fine, although occasionally annoying on the human level. I didn't have much of a problem with RPMs when I used RedHat like four years ago, at least not after I started using rpmfind. I don't think I've seen a logical reason yet for compiling everything... it's a waste of time and bandwidth if you have good binary packages available.Gentoo is better than any other distro. I do admit that I found that http://funroll-loops.org/ funny, though.
  4. Search google for ncurses.
  5. chgrp cdrom /dev/hdb chgrp cdrom /dev/cdrom0 chgrp cdrom /dev/hdc chgrp cdrom /dev/cdrom1 I would find it difficult to believe that hda is your cdrom.
  6. Debian and SuSE both have package managers almost if not as good as distributions. Being binary or source-compiled has absolutely no relavency to the package database. Gentoo has an amazing source database, and debian (and SuSE, to a lesser extent) has an amazing binary package tree. Of course, technically, most Gentoo programs can be installed mostly from binary (though I think it still does the linking) and most Debian packages allow for retreiving the source.
  7. There's a program (I forget what its called, I never needed it) for if your clock is also consistently slow at the same speed, to run a cron job which updates your clock at a regular speed. That's a really unusual speed difference, though. Also, I seem to remeber there being an option somewhere deep in the kernel settings to use the hardware clock or something all the time (not sure).
  8. Quote:Original post by BBB Quote:Original post by NoahAdler Are you sure your hardware is solid? I've seen the read-only file system errors before as a result of bad RAM. You may want to reboot and run memtest86. Can you touch some file on the partition in question and see if the error occurs? A reboot might help, and you should be able to simply pick up where you left off, for the most part. I like to keep a Knoppix disc around for this type of thing, but a Gentoo LiveCD should do just as well. But how do i pick up where i left off? Do i simply have to #mount /dev/hde3 /mnt/gentoo , #mount /dev/hde1 /mnt/gentoo/boot , #chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash and env-update after the rebooting with the gentoo livecd? Is there anything else i have to do?You also have to mount proc. You may also which to do source /etc/profile at the end (recommended by the Handbook). I've done this successfully, you needn't worry about loosing anything. You can only install in the same terminal as where you ran the chroot from (you can do that in more than one), just chroot, env-update, and source /etc/profile.
  9. wsftp is an ftp program.
  10. Post the command you're using to check the ISO.
  11. Quote:Original post by Squirm If I want to post a question about raknet I will post it in the networks forum, because the people who use it probably spend more time reading that than reading this one. Similarly physics and graphics and any other library specific to one section of a game. Things like Allegro, Ogre, SDL, crystal-space and Torque - general all-round game engines - I would post here. How about "Game Engines"?You call Allegro and SDL (the libraries this forum was originally made for and is used most for) engines?
  12. Fedora is the sequal to RedHat, if you're looking for that. I recommend Debian, Gentoo, or SuSE, though (because of their great package managers). I personally use Gentoo, but you may want to try one of the others if you're new to linux (I think there was a debate recently about whether Gentoo is suitable for beginners, no need to bring that up again).
  13. Quote:Original post by Magmai Kai Holmlor Quote:Original post by bytecoder You could try creating soft links to the src and media directories from inside the IDE-specific folders. Don't do this, it confuses most IDEs; Anjuta truncated some of my source files when I tried. BuilderX either cost money or requires a registration, and I am so sick of registering on every site I visit. I'll check out MinGW Studio.It definitely doesn't cost money, and the short registration is well worth it. I can't comment on MinGW Studio, because I've never used it, but I was very impressed with C++BuilderX. I don't use it any more (I use Emacs now), but it was debatably the best IDE I've ever used.
  14. Quote:Original post by bytecoder Quote: I wanted a key which would start some sort of minibuffer which would allow me to enter any command I wanted, not just a specific program. If you make a hotkey that runs fbrun you'll get exactly that. Maybe you should try using your brain before dismissing something, it might help you ;)I know that, the reason I dropped OpenBox was because I didn't like the general feel of it, not because I couldn't get that particular feature. The reason that I replied that that's not what I wanted is because I thought he had misunderstood me, not because I didn't have a solution to that particular problem.
  15. It can. That's not what I wanted. I wanted a key which would start some sort of minibuffer which would allow me to enter any command I wanted, not just a specific program.