• Advertisement

zeon

Member
  • Content count

    16
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

122 Neutral

About zeon

  • Rank
    Member
  1. Cost Of Game Programming

    don't forget that you have to supply (in most cases) a workspace for your team. So renting a studio or something else will cost you. Getting the hardware for the programmers to work, paying a internet connection, water, power. If you don't get a publisher you will also have to worry about selling it, on CDs? again money. Online? A server with a nice bandwidth usage deal, again money. And most importantly: Tons of Coke, Coffee, Energy Drinks, Pizza, Kebap etc ;) That adds up
  2. Ten games every designer should play

    i'm totaly missing one game series: Alone in the Dark 1-3: One hell of difficult games by far the hardest games i've ever played others: Grandia II I just play the game 'cause of the battles, they are plain fun Freespace I + II there's nothing better than sending a swarm of hornet missile into an shivan butt Painkiller Alright, the story isn't that great. And it also doesn't have such nice features like SW Republic Commando (Team Play with AI). The storytelling was like the story... bad... But tell my whats more fun then blasting dozens of cool-looking, freaky, insane etc. enemies to pieces with the most overpowered weapon ever made (RL + Chaingun AWESOME) That game teaches you that a great game doesn't have to be overall complex o and the music was awesome Fallout Tactics: The games quite fun but the best thing about it is the feature to play your own music... nice... would be great for Strategy games of all kind Shining Force I + II II was brief mentioned once in the thread, but it shows you that with just 6 character states, a handfull of spells, items and weapons a great game could be made
  3. what about starting sourcefore projects? if i need a little tool for something (whatever it is) my first check is sourceforge in one window and in another one google as far as i know most people trust sourceforge projects concerning spyware/trojans/viruses etc.
  4. Choosing Unix/Linux Platform

    suse and fedora are in my opinion the best distros to start an interesting alternative would be to use knoppix and install it on your harddisk... just a thought *gg* (in case you do this, give a quick post of your exp with it) but before your start setting up linux on your notebook do a lot of googling about it combined with linux that especially usefull in case of extra buttons on your notebook like volume-control etc. for programming: kdevelop under kde is quite nice but i prefer anjuta and gnome as gui openoffice is a nice suite that will replace office in case of dualboot: always make the first partition windows... a friend of mine didn't do that and the only help was to reinstall it *gg*
  • Advertisement