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las6

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  1. that's pretty neat. Unlike some of the stuff on that page. Anyway, if you're looking for something not-so-photorealistic, we have few images in limefly. like this
  2. well skinning can be done via LithiumUnwrap (nowadays it's called UltimaUnwrap or something) - but be warned, skinning is tricky and by no stretch fast.. Not sure if wings supports bones or skinning, but from what I've seen, I think it only supports limbs (which might be all you need). Basic Skinning can be done in just about any modelling app, just that with limited tools you usually get crappy results. If you *really* need bone & skinning support, try milkshape. I despise the program, but it has VERY extensive support for different model formats and stuff like that. But if you still want to do quick models (recycle bins, bookshelves, swords...) try Metasequoia. I know I mentioned it earlier, but it's different from wings3d or anim8or - those apps just try to be a little bit of everything and fail... Metaseq is just a little modeller made for quick prototyping and stuff like that. If you want something a little bit more fancy, try Silo (someone suggested that before as well) - it's a lot more "pro" but yet very intuitive. Although I think the version I tried ages ago didn't have that many features, I did create some really nice racetracks with splines and such.
  3. Quote:However, as mentioned above, the manner of death is important. The sole survivor of a train wreck is one thing. The sole survivor of a nuclear bomb blast might be another. using the nuclear bomb blast as a way to explain the character seems kinda cheap. Perhaps in the end he could do something like that, but I'd rather go with the train wreck thing. Surviving one train wreck might not seem much, but what if you keep on surviving all sorts of "accidents" all the time where other people die? Say you'd be in three train crashes in a row and somehow survive them all. That surely would raise some questions, right? then again, seeing as you're game is already quite far from the "reality" - surviving a nuclear blast wouldn't be that much of stretch.
  4. dudes, he's looking for the easiest app - and you're recommending blender. That's just wrong. I have nothing against blender but it's definately one of the hardest and most unintuitive programs out there. if you want something really easy to use try Metasequoia - it's a really nice little modelling app. it doesn't have skinning or animation features, but once you've gotten hang of modelling in it, you can do the rest in some other app. There are others too, but I can't remember their names right now. In my opinion Metasequoia is the only modelling app that is really easy and fast to use. You'll be churning out those little models in no time. When you do know about modelling, you can move in to milkshape or even blender. However, these take very technical and annoying approach to the modelling - I rather just click and create faces on the fly than first plot vertices and then group them into faces, while desperatedly trying to make the vertex stay in the right place using the 3 views.
  5. Quote:Unfortunately, this is correct. My travels weren't specifically to capture source material. The idea came to me while there, so I used the only camera available.That's how it starts. ;) After a while, you might start seeing nice textures everywhere. Then you'll start doing trips around places just to get some interesting textures. Quote:One comment, followed by two questions: I'm back home now for at least 2 weeks and am heavily considering a new camera specifically to get some reference shots during my next trip. Question 1) this may be out of the scope of my initial post, but are there any brand/model recommendations for an amateur, perhaps in a $300-400 range? As I'm not american, I can't really say what cameras fall into that price range (they are cheaper over there) - but generally speaking all canon's are good. They are very good all around and even the basic canon cameras (powershot A-line) have had manual controls for all the main features of the camera. The competition has balanced out since a70, so there are other brands out there .. I recommend that you check out dpreview.com for any camera related stuff. Quote:Which may depend on question 2) is 5MP/2560x1920 resolution sufficient? Plenty enough, if the quality of the images is good. so it's about the optical quality too. Most game textures are quite small, and you get better quality when scaling down. I've taken all my photos with 3mp camera (2048x1536) and I usually crop it down to ~1350x1350 then work on it, then scale it down to 1024x1024. If it's high quality photo, it might work, but most of the time I just resize it straight to 512x512 since that's suitable for most games and the texture usually looks tons better. You can see the gradual progress of my work with textures here: limefly.net Quote:I've battled my own shadows and LCD screen glare many times. Well LCD screen glare is something you can't usually do anything about. Just hope for the best.. :) or buy some superkool camera with non-glaring screen. Not sure if there are any out there. Or you could just snap a few pics, then move to shadow to check them out. Shadow-problem is more tricky - Usually I try to take shots when there is lot of non-directional light... that's why summer days Aren't always the best, despite the high amount of light. (at least around here) Because directional light brings shadows.. and while shadows can be nice, they can ruin the texture you are trying to capture. And then your own shadow will mess up the rest. But if the lighting is really strong, you could try zooming in so that you won't see your own shadow in the image.
  6. well it depends on what sort of equipment you happen to have. Salsa's pointers were good, but then again you said you were using 1600x1200 resolution so chances are you have only 2-3megapixel camera. Kinda hard to find replacement lenses or RAW support for those. :P First rule is to set the resolution to the max. With normal cameras, you can use only a small portion of the image in most cases. While it is possible to fix the lens distortion / perspective in photoshop it requires you to have a really high res source material since you need to scale the image down when fixing distortion/perspective. otherwise you lose quality. One way to combat the distortion is to zoom in just a bit. If you have a big screen in the camera, you'll see what I mean. However, this is usually bad idea unless you got the perfect lighting conditions. Speaking of lighting conditions, that's actually the thing that matters the most. At least to me. When shooting for textures, there really needs to be enough (hopefully non-directional) light so that camera can really capture what you are seeing. Sometimes you have to help it a bit. (dark asphalt tends to come up too bright) Take a lot of photos. Fill up that memory card and get a new one. Chances are that many of the shots won't be good enough - so it's good to have a lot to choose from. And if you move a bit between the shots, you can use the extra material to stitch up a bigger image. also, don't stand too close to the target. The edges of your photo won't that useful so keep the part you want in the middle and take a step back. If it's ground that you are shooting, then try to climb up or just raise the camera as high as you can. This can prove out to be a little tricky, though... so you might get better results just holding the camera the normal way. If you have a small screen or you just want to make sure that the shots turned out good, browse through them and zoom in some of the details. if they look blurry, chances are the image is useless.
  7. look here: limefly.net You should at least find plenty of grass textures. :)
  8. ...and here's more: www.limefly.net
  9. 'It looks like they added bumpmapping and/or parallax/displacement mapping to the ground textures. That would be your "better textures"' exactly. But the thing is, those "better textures" look WORSE than the original ones. Just look at the beach scene.. horrible, just horrible. Definately not worth getting the 64-bit cpu.
  10. usually the most efficient method is the one you're most comfortable with. That said, connect-the-dots is a horrible way to do. Yes, you can model using that... but I honestly feel sorry for you because you went and learnt how to model that way. It's harder to switch now. This is actually the reason why I never liked Milkshape. I prefer to create my own triangles/quads on the fly or do box modelling. Box modelling is where you first create a box then use all sorts of tools to change it into something (usually) completely different. The way you model in say, metasequoia is closer to connect-the-dots as in milkshape, but not as tedious. Basically you create the triangles by clicking where the vertices go. (if you click an existing vertex, it will use that) So rather than first doing the points and then the faces, you'll do it all at the same time. It's a lot faster... especially in application as intuitive as metasequoia. But this "method" doesn't work so well in 4-window layout.
  11. not sure if it's "politically correct" to post my own site here, but some of you might like it: limefly.net [ Free textures + gfx ] [Edited by - las6 on June 9, 2005 2:34:36 AM]
  12. first of all, your post didn't make any sense. But here's me trying to answer your question anyway: I think you are referring here to the max polys that the darkbasic (http://darkbasic.thegamecreators.com) language can handle. Well that isn't a question that can be answered just like that. What I can tell you is that the max poly/vertex count for models used in Dark Basic is around 65536 - but you can split your models and join them in-game. As for what it can run... well, that depends on your computer.